AMONG FRIENDS by Henry Knox Sherrill

AMONG FRIENDS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

The retired Presiding Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church, Henry Knox Sherrill, has written a warm and friendly chronicle of his life which will charm the many who are happy to be called his friends, and which will win for him many other friends of the spirit whom he will never know. Born in Brooklyn, educated at Hotchkiss and Yale, Henry Sherrill was an average American of normal talents and simple piety who took to the Episcopal Church as naturally as a bird flies, and the Church advanced him from curacy to chaplain to rector to Bishop to Chief Bishop almost as if there were no one else around at the time deserving of equal consideration. A moderate churchman, a good administrator, a kindly and wise but firm pastor of his flock, clerical and otherwise, he was beloved by all who learned to look to him for guidance and leadership that was sure and steady, if not spectacular. As President of the National Council of Churches for a while he exercised there the same sort of calm direction which is one of the things needed by a troubled world. Bishop Sherrill would be the last to make for himself any claims as a scholar with original theological insight, but he is revealed here nevertheless as one who is able to relate the riches of the faith to the changing problems of the present. Many are therefore in his debt, and will be glad to read the life-story of this fine human being so modestly and naturally told.

Pub Date: Oct. 23rd, 1962
Publisher: Little, Brown-A.M.P.