WILL THE HUMAN RACE SURVIVE? by Henry Still

WILL THE HUMAN RACE SURVIVE?

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Yes, says Mr. Still, resoundingly and for once quite convincingly. Probing in his Foreword the salient queries surrounding the greatest contemporary human problem--the one we feebly label ""the population explosion""-- he rejects the currently most favored solution, contraception, as at best too clumsy and dangerous a tool. Ticking off all the statistics and calculations of Malthusian pessimists, he asserts that ""men are actually at work upon the basic techniques which can provide unlimited expansion of humanity for centuries to come."" Besides food, clothing, and shelter, he finds three essential needs: water, power, and land on which to live. He devotes a third of this volume to each of these, describing in some detail the possibilities now being opened up and how they interact, as for instance how ""with adequate water and power the deserts will become livable."" Of course, every answer he supplies carries with it further, larger, untouched questions--what viable forms could political structures take in a world containing twenty times the present 3.2 billion people, for example--but nevertheless this author's confident tone should be welcomed in a debate that has so far been dominated by the doomsayers.

Pub Date: April 4th, 1966
Publisher: Hawthorn