YOUR BRAIN AND HOW IT WORKS by Herbert S. Zim

YOUR BRAIN AND HOW IT WORKS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

With no glossary or outright definitions, this comfortable-looking introduction to the structure, functions, and evolution of the brain is neither as easy as it looks or as straightforward as it reads. Zim touches lightly on such topics as dominant sides, sensory areas in the cortex, organic and functional diseases of the ""brain and mind,"" the relationship of the brain to the concept of ""mind,"" brains and behavior, and the implications of brain injury in different areas. Even more offhand references are made to areas of recent research or controversy: lobotomy, kwashiorkor and intelligence, the dolphin's cerebrum (it has more furrows than a man's but ""the human brain still seems best""), sex differences (women, being smaller, have smaller brains than men, but they are ""just as good for thinking""), and the motherless Madison monkeys (presented in picture and caption with no relation to the main text). Edith Weart's The Story of Your Brain and Nerves (1961), though less inviting in format, sticks closer to the basics, and Margaret O. Hyde's Your Brain (1964) offers older children a far more stimulating and clarifying survey of brain research.

Pub Date: March 22nd, 1972
Publisher: Morrow