SOLDIERS WITHOUT SWORDS by Herbert Wisbey

SOLDIERS WITHOUT SWORDS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

These are the spirited annals of the Salvation Army since its debarkation in New York 75 years ago. Without tears or varnished glory, the record goes back to the first convert, known as ""Ash-barrel Jimmy"", and on to the civic ordinance which originally drove the tambourine off the New York city streets and sent its holy clamor to New Jersey, Philadelphia, and then west. The internal schisms which brought wreck and ruin to the early leaders; the newspaper that was founded; the posters using subpoena forms which lured the damned to meetings; the emergence of the doughnut as a halo; the nursing services, prison work, shelters for unwed mothers, and countless contributions to human welfare created by the Salvation Army make up its story. This book strikes just the right tone; it has all the necessary irreverence- and candor; and aiming at a wide audience- there's enough buckshot to hit much of the mark.

Publisher: Macmillan