THE SATIRES OF JONATHAN SWIFT by Herbort Davis

THE SATIRES OF JONATHAN SWIFT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A cool, classical examination and elucidation of Swift as a literary, political and moral satirist. The author, President of Smith College, is an authority on Swift. In the first of the three essays, he analyzes A Tale of a Tub in which the corruption of English letters wa the object of his satire; in the second, he discusses the two periods in which Swift's pen became political,- the last years of Queen Anne's reign when he wrote the Tory tracts for the Tory ministry, and later, in the name and manner of a Dublin linen draper, the Irish writings to prevent collaboration with England and keep alive the Irish spirit of independence. The last essay deals with the famous moral satire. Gulliver's Travels, the finest and most complete satire on human life in which the brutality, stupidity, and ""unestimable sum of human pain"" in the world of man was scored.... For students and specialists in this field.

Pub Date: Feb. 11th, 1947
Publisher: Macmillan