STEPPENWOLF by Hermann Hense

STEPPENWOLF

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Nobel 1946 Prize (which was published here in 1929 and which in republishing has overlooked the stigma of the printed ""nigger"" in the text) that, except for the implications and symbolism read into it, will scarcely appeal to the wide reading public. Through the latter days, in memories, of Haller who believes himself a dual personality, is reflected the monstrous, lonely, genius for suffering, is previsioned the trend towards Nazism, is documented the suicidal tendencies of the times. As Steppenwolf shadows the inward death of Haller, as fantasy footnotes factual existence, as male and female, incident and dream emphasize Haller's last desperate search, there is the underlining of homeless intellect, the causes and the meaning of the terror of the years after the last war. An impressionistic, sometimes almost Dali-esque preview of things to come, particularly interesting in the light of what has happened.

Pub Date: March 17th, 1947
Publisher: Holt