BRIDE AT EIGHTEEN by Hila Colman
Kirkus Star

BRIDE AT EIGHTEEN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Kate Hebron doen't operate on more than one cylinder when she meets Mike Gordon, in college; she comes from Vermont, an uninterested, uninteresting home (Readers Digest and television); Mike come from Brooklyn and he's voluble, independent, intellectually involved. They fall in love and marry, and Kate leaves college while he goes on to law school. They have problems, many more than just her chronological age. As Mike says ""the trouble with you is you want a modern husband, but an old-fashioned marriage."" This is a subversive oversimplication of her underdeveloped feminine mystique; actually she has to go to work to support him, do all the household chores, and then face his criticisms of her lack of interest and participation in what he's doing. Eventually she realizes she must change and she gets a job in a Settlement House, works with people, and then decides to go to night school and pick up her education in order to keep up with him...Unintentionally this should discourage any gal in her right mind from marrying at eighteen, but in the process it has converted some very real issues into a likable story. And the dialogue is believable and certainly indulges none of the snack shop chitchat that the title might suggest.

Pub Date: Sept. 21st, 1966
Publisher: Morrow