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DANGLED CARAT by Hilary Grossman

DANGLED CARAT

By Hilary Grossman

Publisher: Manuscript

Grossman’s true-life account of her quest for a wedding ring despite a boyfriend wary of commitment.

In her mid-20s, Grossman found herself trying to get past an on-again, off-again boyfriend. Having a nice dinner with her mother, she met a mature man named Marc, who encouraged her to try new things. His gorgeous townhouse on a beach in Long Island wasn’t too shabby, either. As their relationship slowly progressed, Grossman discovered that Marc was known for his aversion to the idea of marriage. But she didn’t want to suffer the same fate as her mother, who had to wait a considerable amount of time for her father to commit; an even bigger fear for Grossman was the possibility that her romance wouldn’t end in a happy marriage like it did for her parents before her father passed away. Marc’s friends and family put pressure on him to pop the question by the time Marc and Grossman left for a New Year’s trip to Florida, and when he didn’t, Grossman was heartbroken—but she decided to give him more time. When another New Year’s rolls around, Marc was uncharacteristically open to the discussion of marriage and even promised that they’ll be engaged by summer. Although she was excited, Grossman wasn’t quite confident that Marc wouldn’t change his mind. Marc’s actions and his caring, loving attitude toward her seemed to outweigh his inability to express himself; however, Grossman says: “Sometimes a girl needs to be told what a guy feels, rather than trying to decipher the signs.” In this nonfiction story, Grossman honestly discusses her genuine insecurities in her life and relationships as she juggles career aspirations and a close relationship with her mother. Marc’s motivations, however, are largely brushed over since Grossman constantly tries to avoid confrontation; nonetheless, the story could have benefited from more of his perspective. Although the drama of it all can be engaging, and Grossman thankfully steers clear of whining, her lack of action can be frustrating even if it’s relatable for women who cling to the hope that someday the right guy will commit. Fans of Sex and the City—Grossman makes a reference to Carrie Bradshaw and Mr. Big—will enjoy the story, but its real-girl charm should draw an even wider crowd.

Patience is a virtue in this relatable, real-life love story.