History Book Reviews

CANNIBALISM by Bill Schutt
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"One takeaway: humans don't taste like chicken. A learned, accessible, and engaging approach to a meaty—beg pardon—and always-controversial subject."
Zoologist Schutt (Biology/LIU Post; Dark Banquet: Blood and the Curious Lives of Blood-Feeding Creatures, 2008) gets to the heart of the matter of a topic that makes people shudder. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An exciting, suspenseful tale of international intrigue."
An elegant presentation of Winston Churchill's special guerrilla operations force, which consistently met the dirty exigencies of war. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An engrossing, haunting journey for bibliophiles and World War II historians."
An erudite exploration of the systematic plundering of libraries and book collections by Nazi invaders. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A lively and edifying narrative with lessons for today."
In her first book, Purnell gets our nerve endings tingling with an exploration of the interplay of mind and body as seen through the lens of the Enlightenment. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An intimate, often affecting look back at a group of young men who established an American air superiority that persists to this day."
In his first book, a British journalist tells the story of the airmen who reduced the Third Reich to ashes. Read full book review >

FROM BACTERIA TO BACH AND BACK by Daniel C. Dennett
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Anyone interested in modern theories of the mind and consciousness has to reckon with Dennett. This book, dense but accessible, is as good a place as any to start."
The dean of consciousness-raising consciousness-explaining returns with another cleareyed exploration of the mind. Read full book review >
AGE OF ANGER by Pankaj Mishra
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A probing, well-informed investigation of global unrest calling for 'truly transformative thinking' about humanity's future."
How the failures of capitalism have led to "fear, confusion, loneliness and loss"—and global anger. Read full book review >
DEMOCRACY by David A. Moss
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"A sterling educational tool that offers a fresh presentation of how 'democracy in America has always been a contact sport.'"
A vigorous civics lesson of 19 case studies that illustrate America's evolving democratic processes and institutions. Read full book review >
THE ALLURE OF BATTLE by Cathal J. Nolan
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"A must-read for students of military history."
Why wars are won not in a single decisive battle but over the long haul. Read full book review >
HELL NO by Tom Hayden
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 31, 2017

"Movement-builders of today will want to take note of Hayden's thoughtful look back."
"Hell, no, we won't go!" Recently deceased politician and one-time radical leader Hayden (Listen Yankee! Why Cuba Matters, 2015, etc.) sounds a cri di antiguerre for the movement that helped halt America's misadventure in Vietnam. Read full book review >
THE AGE OF CAESAR by Plutarch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 31, 2017

"If crucifixions and ferocious street fighting no longer characterize contemporary politics, Plutarch's rivalrous, 'inglorious' world in discomfiting ways echoes through our own time."
The estimable Greek historian depicts ancient Rome's violent politics. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"Kurlantzick's comprehensive account provides new insights into the CIA's objectives in the Laos war and the way that they were incorporated into its broader mission."
A history of the CIA's involvement in the Laos war and the effect it had on the structure and evolution of the organization and its future role in foreign conflicts. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 14, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >