History Book Reviews (page 10)

TOUSSAINT LOUVERTURE by Philippe Girard
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"A groundbreaking biography that underscores the difficulties of leading slaves to freedom and avoiding violent extremes."
A biography of the man who challenged the power of the leading empires of his day and led the only successful slave revolt in human history. Read full book review >
ISLAND PEOPLE by Joshua Jelly-Schapiro
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"An eminently well-informed narrative."
A geographer's exuberant travel narrative about the nations and people of the Caribbean. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"A book remarkable for its depth, breadth, and intellectual daring."
A Pulitzer Prize-winning historian examines the fanatical secular religion of American exceptionalism and why it is leading government officials and the electorate astray in an increasingly violent world. Read full book review >
ISTANBUL by Thomas F. Madden
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"An illuminating journey through the history and culture of the metropolis that 'still towers over all other cities in Europe and the Middle East.'"
The author of Venice: A New History (2012) returns with the astonishing and sanguinary story of the iconic city on the Bosporus. Read full book review >
THE EMBASSY by Dante Paradiso
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 21, 2016

"A compelling account of an obscure international crisis."
Paradiso (The Pure Life, 2005) tells the story of how the staff of the American Embassy in Monrovia attempted to halt the second Liberian civil war.Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A largely untold, engrossing history of our nation's fraught, and unlikely, path to liberty."
European allies supplied arms, ammunition, uniforms, savvy commanders, engineers, and soldiers to aid the American Revolution. Read full book review >
THE HISTORY OF ROCK & ROLL, VOLUME 1 by Ed Ward
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A spry study that should inspire listening with newly informed ears to old tunes, from 'Bulldozer Blues' to 'Teenager in Love' and beyond."
A dean of rock journalism delivers the first volume of a magnum opus on a subject that never ceases to fascinate. Read full book review >
BUTTER by Elaine Khosrova
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A tasty but limited history of butter."
A pastry chef and food writer offers a detailed history of her favorite ingredient. Read full book review >
VICTORIA by Julia Baird
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A well-researched biography sensitive to Queen Victoria as a woman."
Australian journalist and historian Baird (Media Tarts: Female Politicians and the Press, 2004) draws on previously unpublished sources to fashion a lively, perceptive portrait of the long-reigning queen. Read full book review >
THE VANQUISHED by Robert Gerwarth
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A thorough explanation for the rise of the nationalist and fascist groups who set the stage for World War II."
The first study of the disorders that shook all the defeated states of Europe following World War I. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A lively contribution to popular histories of New York and its institutions, worthy of shelving alongside Robert Caro's The Power Broker and Edwin Burrows and Mike Wallace's Gotham."
An eye-opening history of the Manhattan hospital whose name is a byword for asylums everywhere. Read full book review >
WRITING TO SAVE A LIFE by John Edgar Wideman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A book seething with the passion and sense of outrage behind the Black Lives Matter movement that also traces specific roots of the movement's genealogy."
The present illuminates the past—but can't provide resolution—in this generation-spanning meditation on injustice. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >