History Book Reviews (page 10)

THE GENE by Siddhartha Mukherjee
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"Sobering, humbling, and extraordinarily rich reading from a wise and gifted writer who sees how far we have come—but how much farther we have to go to understand our human nature and destiny."
A panoramic history of the gene and how genetics "resonate[s] far beyond the realms of science." Read full book review >
LABOR OF LOVE by Moira Weigel
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"An earnest plea to think about love mindfully."
Dating undermines authenticity, the author claims. Read full book review >

THE BITTER TASTE OF VICTORY by Lara Feigel
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"A deep, significant exploration of artistic atonement in postwar Germany."
An elucidating cultural study explores the ways artists forged a sense of redemption—both personal and societal—from the devastation of post-World War II Germany. Read full book review >
WALKING POINT by Perry A. Ulander
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"A compulsively readable book for anyone who lived through the Vietnam era—or who wants an idea of what it was like."
A former GI recalls his tour of duty in Vietnam, and it's not quite the story readers may expect. Read full book review >
THE BOYS IN THE BUNKHOUSE by Dan Barry
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"Gently, empathetically, and indelibly, Barry conveys a tale of unthinkable brutality."
A gripping indictment of society's treatment of "losers." Read full book review >

THE NAZI HUNTERS by Andrew Nagorski
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"Packed with the tangled, riveting detail of the many cases, this is more sensational reading than astute legal analysis—but absorbing nonetheless."
A detailed look at the grim work of tracking Nazis over the decades since World War II. Read full book review >
THE MONEY CULT by Chris Lehmann
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"Lehmann makes an important and timely point, which is that American religion has always been about money."
A lively study of how the prim Puritans of old, "tireless strivers after divine favor and sticklers for political order," became the mega-churchy materialists of today. Read full book review >
PAPER by Mark Kurlansky
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"Kurlansky has been breezier in the past, a better stylistic choice for books with this level of detail to become absorbing reads."
Kurlansky (City Beasts: Fourteen Stories of Uninvited Wildlife, 2015, etc.), who chronicles world history and human advancement via one telling topic at a time, chooses paper for his latest undertaking. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 15, 2016

"Great fun for anyone with even a slight knowledge of Roman and English history and geography—or those curious about them."
A delightful trip from Rome to Hadrian's Wall—in C.E. 130. Read full book review >
Part of the Family by Jason Hensley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 14, 2016

"An invaluable illumination of small acts of astonishing bravery and generosity in the darkest days of war."
A compassionate, detailed account of a little-known corner of World War II history. Read full book review >
THE POLITICIANS AND THE EGALITARIANS by Sean Wilentz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 11, 2016

"A master scholar delivers a delightfully stimulating historical polemic."
A stern, thoroughly satisfying harangue on the realities of politics in the United States by the veteran, prizewinning historian. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"A lively account of our Revolution's most reviled figure."
A history of the American Revolution, focused on George Washington (1732-1799) and Benedict Arnold (1741-1801), in which the author acknowledges Arnold's good points but does not fully rehabilitate him. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >