History Book Reviews (page 10)

BRIGHT, INFINITE FUTURE by Mark Green
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"In the race between 'hope and hate,' Green's informative historical memoir shows him to be firmly on the side of hope for America."
A memoir that offers reasons for optimism about America's political future. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A thoroughly researched but plodding account of the clash of two implacably incompatible cultures."
Cultural historian Hutton (History/Univ. of New Mexico; Phil Sheridan and His Army, 1985, etc.) presents the sorry history of white America's persecution of the ferocious tribe that consistently returned their ill treatment measure for measure.Read full book review >

THE CULTURAL REVOLUTION by Frank Dikötter
HISTORY
Released: May 3, 2016

"A potent combination of precise history and moving examples, plus a useful chronology of events."
An eminent China scholar uses increasingly available primary materials for a fine, sharp study of this tumultuous, elusive era—the third volume in a trilogy. Read full book review >
ELIZABETH by John Guy
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"One of the best biographies of Elizabeth ever."
The Whitbread Award-winning author delivers an outstanding biography of Queen Elizabeth (1533-1603). Read full book review >
THE WAR BEFORE INDEPENDENCE by Derek W. Beck
HISTORY
Released: May 3, 2016

"Revolutionary War fans will rejoice in this well-written work and hope that the author has more on the way."
Beck (Igniting the American Revolution: 1773-1775, 2015) continues his deeply detailed story of the American Revolution's beginnings.Read full book review >

THE LONG WEEKEND by Adrian Tinniswood
HISTORY
Released: May 3, 2016

"An enjoyable tour with a genial, informed, devoted docent."
A nostalgic account of life at English country houses during the interbellum era. Read full book review >
HOMINTERN by Gregory Woods
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 3, 2016

"An information-heavy book that provides a wonderful resource for those interested in learning about the rise of gay poetics at the onset of the 20th century."
A comprehensive anthropological survey exploring the ways in which the gay community has changed the world. Read full book review >
RED PLATOON by Clinton Romesha
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"Romesha ably captures the daily dangers faced by these courageous American soldiers in Afghanistan."
An account of the horrendous October 2009 attack on the American Combat Outpost Keating in Afghanistan, told in a frank, engaging vernacular by the staff sergeant and Medal of Honor winner. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 3, 2016

"Spirited, witty, and ferociously incisive."
Bitch Media co-founder and creative director Zeisler (Feminism and Pop Culture, 2008) ruminates about how the current wave of feminism does not "challenge beliefs…so much as it offers nips and tucks."Read full book review >
ONEIDA by Ellen Wayland-Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A smartly contextualized tale of 'the tension between radical social critique and unapologetic accommodation...between communal harmony and individual striving.'"
A study of the unlikely origins of one of America's most recognizable brands. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 2, 2016

"An important book that not only shows how the slave trade operated, but also provides a clearer picture of the victims' origins, language, and methods of survival."
A history of how captives purchased in Africa for transport on the slave ship Hare managed to maintain a community after being sold into slavery.Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 2, 2016

"A thoughtful historical study of the entrenched symbolism of a dreaded bridge in Mississippi, a landmark that 'fixed attention on Jim Crow's brutal excesses and unresolved legacies.'"
History of the most notorious sites in Mississippi for white-on-black violence, from 1918 to 1966. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >