History Book Reviews (page 12)

CLASSICAL LITERATURE by Richard Jenkyns
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Jenkyns' enthusiasm and erudition infuse a shrewd, illuminating narrative."
A deft distillation of 1,000 years of literature. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"Timely, authoritative, and immensely depressing."
A visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution's Doha Center examines the emergence, growth, and evolution of the Syrian jihad from 2011 to 2015. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: March 1, 2016

"An accessible, elucidating study by a knowledgeable expert."
A spotlight on Gen. John Pershing's First Army at a pivotal moment in the war of attrition against the Germans. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"A must-read for military buffs and a should-read for anyone who has given even a cursory thought to the U.S. efforts in Afghanistan and Iraq."
The search for the story behind an IED death leads to the history of the post-9/11 wars and the lives of the men and women who fight them. Read full book review >
SELLING WAR by Steven J. Alvarez
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"A pull-no-punches critique that spares few in the defense establishment."
In his debut, a former public affairs officer reflects on the U.S. Army's failed information war in Iraq. Read full book review >

DARK TERRITORY by Fred Kaplan
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 2016

"An important, disturbing, and gripping history arguing convincingly that, as of 2015, no defense exists against a resourceful cyberattack."
For centuries, spies could only listen to enemy communications. In this thoughtful, opinionated history, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist warns that in today's cyberage, "once they hacked a computer, they could prowl the entire network…they could not only read and download scads of information, they could change its contents—disrupt, corrupt, or erase it—and mislead or disorient the officials who relied on it." Read full book review >
THE IMMORTAL IRISHMAN by Timothy Egan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"A fascinating, well-told story by an author fully committed to his subject. Egan's impeccable research, uncomplicated readability, and flowing narrative reflect his deep knowledge of a difficult and complex man."
The story of Thomas Meagher (1823-1867), an Irishman radicalized by the famine who became a hero on three continents. Read full book review >
APOSTLE by Tom Bissell
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 2016

"A rich, contentious, and challenging book."
A deep dive into the heart of the New Testament, crossing continents and cross-referencing texts. Read full book review >
FROM SILK TO SILICON by Jeffrey E. Garten
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Of interest to students of economic history, though less intellectually compelling than David Warsh's Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations (2006) or even Robert Allen's Global Economic History: A Very Short Introduction (2011)."
Yale economic historian Garten (The Big Ten: The Big Emerging Markets and How They Will Change Our Lives, 1997, etc.) looks at 10 pioneers of the new global economy, from Genghis Khan to Deng Xiaoping.Read full book review >
CONSTANCE FENIMORE WOOLSON by Anne Boyd Rioux
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 29, 2016

"An intelligent, sympathetic portrait of a complicated, even tortured writer who calls for fresh readers."
A fine reappraisal of the work of the Victorian novelist and dear friend to Henry James. Read full book review >
HEART OF EUROPE by Peter H. Wilson
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 29, 2016

"An encyclopedic reference work to be consulted but likely not completely read by anyone other than fellow academics."
Wilson (History/Univ. of Hull; The Thirty Years War: Europe's Tragedy, 2009, etc.) delves into the makeup, structure, and lands of the Holy Roman Empire, which lasted "more than a millennium, well over twice as long as imperial Rome itself."Read full book review >
BLOOD YEAR by David Kilcullen
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 29, 2016

"Direct, insightful, and frightening, this book will prepare readers to see through the misguided, simplistic solutions to the problems of Middle Eastern policy and Islamic terror so common in this election year."
A "mid-level player in some of the key events of the past decade" delivers a dispassionate, discouraging analysis of how the Western counterterrorism effort has gone so terribly wrong. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 3, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >