History Book Reviews (page 12)

WHERE MEMORY LEADS by Saul Friedländer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"Though dry in tone, the book is haunting in scope and depth."
A foremost Holocaust scholar carefully reflects on his harsh early years and lifelong academic mission in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Geneva, and Los Angeles. Read full book review >
FRANCE by Jonathan Fenby
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"A capable history sure to appeal to all lovers of France."
Fenby (Will China Dominate the 21st Century?, 2014, etc.) investigates France's attempts to live up to her revolutionary ideals and how she has become a prisoner of her history and its narratives. Read full book review >

A RADICAL FAITH by Eileen Markey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"Rich details and solid storytelling convey one nun's story of her dedication to God and her fellow humans."
The biography of a Catholic nun who was murdered while trying to help those in need. Read full book review >
FINAL SOLUTION by David Cesarani
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"A highly learned but problematic examination of Nazi decision-making."
In a sweeping historical reappraisal, Cesarani (Disraeli, 2016, etc.), who died in 2015, asserts that the Nazi extermination of Jews was not inevitable but rather a consequence of Germany's military losses. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"A quirky but always delightful social history that will convince most readers that social revolutions have been happening for a long time."
Most observers agree that the 20th century saw dazzling changes: the automobile, airplane, atom bomb, antibiotics, computers, space travel, the internet, and hundreds of other amazing advancements. What century can match that? Every one since 1000, responds veteran British social historian Mortimer, and he makes a convincing case. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"A cogently argued account that lays bare the similarities and differences between the world today and earlier theoretical shortcomings."
An economic historian challenges both politicians and economists in this account of why the post-World War II economic boom came to an end and what followed. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"Not always easy reading but a book from which more than just Irish citizens can learn."
Irish history from the Irish point of view. Read full book review >
WHEN THE NEW DEAL CAME TO TOWN by George Melloan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"Authors tend to want to reach the maximum number of readers; Melloan, on the other hand, seems determined to drive away anybody who might be considered a 'liberal.'"
A retired Wall Street Journal editor recalls growing up in a small Midwestern town in the 1930s and strives to show the relevance to today's economic struggles across the country. Read full book review >
JFK AND THE MASCULINE MYSTIQUE by Steven Watts
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"A fresh perspective on a president whose style, legacy, and politics continue to inspire discussions about freedom and leadership values."
A focused cultural analysis of John F. Kennedy's "manly ethos." Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A winning concluding volume in a series that does for Eleanor Roosevelt what Robert Caro has done for Lyndon Johnson."
Having already devoted more than 1,200 pages to the extraordinary life of Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) in two previous installments, the skilled biographer offers the final volume. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A deeply informed investigation into a radically innovative poet."
The creation and influence of an iconic modernist poem. Read full book review >
CASANOVA by Laurence Bergreen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Casanova's adventures include plenty of juicy details, and Bergreen weaves in just enough to prove his reputation. His travels during one of history's most exciting periods will be great fun for any history lover."
Bergreen (Columbus: The Four Voyages, 2011, etc.) applies his historical storytelling skills to the famous Venetian lover, introducing his intellectual side. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >