History Book Reviews (page 12)

HISTORY
Released: April 26, 2016

"A nuanced study of the illusory, troubling early arguments over emancipation and integration."
How the concept of "separate but equal" emerged from whites' inability to envision full civil rights for blacks and Native Americans after emancipation. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 26, 2016

"A cogent, organized history of the beginnings of free speech in the United States."
Accessible study of America's fierce devotion to freedom of speech through the vociferous public reactions to Britain's perceived tyranny. Read full book review >

SPEAKING FREELY by Robert L. Bernstein
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 26, 2016

"A well-written book for lovers of book publishing and supporters of human rights."
Former Random House President Bernstein gives a fascinating history of publishing in the 20th century and traces the beginnings of the human rights movement. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 26, 2016

"Well written and full of firsthand insight—a good companion to weightier studies such as Timothy Miller's The 60s Communes (1999) and Arthur Kopecky's Leaving New Buffalo Commune (2006)."
If you can remember the '60s, you may have been there—but as a very young person, as this thoughtful history reveals. Read full book review >
THE UKRAINIAN AND RUSSIAN NOTEBOOKS by Igort
HISTORY
Released: April 26, 2016

"A work that ranks with the best journalism and the finest graphic artistry."
A masterful mix of journalistic reporting and graphic art. Read full book review >

TOM PAINE'S IRON BRIDGE by Edward G. Gray
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 25, 2016

"A fresh look at an influential political activist."
The story of a man committed to transforming the landscape of the new world. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 25, 2016

"A thorough look at the dissension that tore the country apart."
A historian examines Abraham Lincoln's trajectory toward the ending of slavery. Read full book review >
THE HABSBURG EMPIRE by Pieter M. Judson
HISTORY
Released: April 25, 2016

"A nuanced scholarly reappraisal of a significant European empire."
A fresh look at this sprawling empire that rejects its previous characterization as "backward" and asserts an overall administrative enlightenment the citizenry found engaging. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 2016

"A chilling portrait of a country under siege and one man's defiance."
The tale of a devoted collector of manuscripts who outwitted militant jihadis. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 19, 2016

"A straightforward account considers all sides to these precise missions."
From breaching German dams to targeting U-boat pens with "Grand Slams," the Royal Air Force's 617 Squadron receives fresh recognition for crippling the Nazi war machine. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 2016

"Between the dizzying sums lost and gained, Zacks offers a rollicking history perfect for Twain's countless fans."
An amusing, singular account of the world tour by the nation's most famous humorist, chased by creditors. Read full book review >
GHETTO by Mitchell Duneier
HISTORY
Released: April 19, 2016

"Americans did not create the ghetto, but in this well-documented study, we see clearly how those urban areas have come to embody so many of our shortcomings when it comes to matters of race."
How communities—especially in the United States—created, ostracized, and condemned the idea and reality of the ghetto. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >