History Book Reviews (page 12)

A DISTANT HEARTBEAT by Eunice Lipton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2016

"Flawed but well-researched and often stirring."
An art historian's account of the research she undertook to understand the life of a mysterious uncle. Read full book review >
HEADS by Jesse Jarnow
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 2016

"Latter-day heads—as well as 'relentless dabblers' and the historically minded—will enjoy this well-researched, mind-altering excursion."
A history of the interplay between hallucinogens and rock music in the innocent minds of young America. Read full book review >

KICK KENNEDY by Barbara Leaming
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2016

"Leaming doesn't present much new for Kennedy buffs, but the age of Downton Abbey offers fresh context for this story of American royalty and its more tradition-minded British counterpart."
A biography of the comparatively unheralded sister closest in age to John F. Kennedy strains to find something new to say about the Kennedy clan. Read full book review >
FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT by Roger Daniels
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 30, 2016

"An excellent resource that hews to the president's words as reflecting or obscuring his actions."
A fine, fully fleshed portrait of Franklin Roosevelt during his final years, in his own words. Read full book review >
SPAIN IN OUR HEARTS by Adam Hochschild
HISTORY
Released: March 29, 2016

"Hochschild ably explores subtle shades of the conflict that contemporary authors and participants did not want to consider."
A nuanced look at the messy international allegiances forged during the Spanish Civil War. Read full book review >

FREDERICK THE GREAT by Tim Blanning
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 29, 2016

"While the sections about Frederick's childhood and reign are well-written and informative, it is the war coverage that will win over readers looking for a different view of the Seven Years' War."
Prussia owes its reputation as the personification of militarism to Frederick the Great (1712-1786), who, though mocked by his own father as a weakling, foreshadowed Napoleon's military genius. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 29, 2016

"A masterly work best suited to those who study marketing and are undaunted by the dense, detailed narrative."
A wide-ranging exposition of the human life of buying, selling, and trading from the Renaissance until now. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 29, 2016

"A fantastic addition to the shelves of World War I histories."
The first English-language account of a small army that actually took control of Siberia in 1918. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 29, 2016

"Provocative, especially in this election year, though unlikely to sway doctrinaire members of the reigning party."
A free market, purely capitalist in nature? It doesn't exist—not in this country, anyway, despite right-wing claims to the contrary. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 29, 2016

"A footnote to a much larger story but a welcome one."
A fascinating scholarly detective story centering on the often overlooked ideological architect of the Third Reich, who could never be made to "accept the notion that the ideas he had trumpeted had led to genocide." Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 22, 2016

"Students of American history will appreciate the detail and the thoroughness of this account of what Churchill called the 'first world war.'"
MacLeod (The Canadian Iroquois and the Seven Years' War, 2012, etc.) uses diaries, letters, and other personal accounts to demonstrate the effects of the pivotal battle of the Seven Years' War, showing how it resounded throughout the Western world for years.Read full book review >
THE LOST BOOK OF MOSES by Chanan Tigay
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"A work of broad appeal, for the history buff and mystery lover alike."
The search for the world's oldest biblical manuscript. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >