History Book Reviews (page 13)

HISTORY
Released: March 22, 2016

"With suspicions still extant in the town, the book delivers an eye-opening reminder of ongoing bigotry."
An account of the savage killings of two black couples in an insular, bigoted Georgia town just after World War II. Read full book review >
JOHN QUINCY ADAMS by James Traub
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"An impassioned biography of 'a coherent and consistent thinker who adhered to his core political convictions across his decades of public service.'"
The life of an early American statesman and president who served as the young nation's strenuous conscience. Read full book review >

THE ENVOY by Zalmay Khalilzad
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"A chronological, straightforward, occasionally disturbing history of the challenges leading to the current morass."
A Middle East adviser recounts the role of the United States in the region over the past three decades. Read full book review >
THE PAPER TRAIL by Alexander Monro
HISTORY
Released: March 22, 2016

"Illuminating, richly detailed history."
From China to Eurasia to Europe, how paper profoundly changed culture. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 22, 2016

"A historical tour de force."
No less than Paris in the 1920s, New York City in the 1940s was the center of the world, according to this exhilarating account of the city during that decade. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: March 21, 2016

"A significant work of social history bound to please serious readers and scholars."
The story of more than 55 million people who succumbed to "America fever" and emigrated from Eastern Europe in the century before World War II. Read full book review >
THE KING'S BED by Don Jordan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 2016

"The authors' easy, readable style makes this a solid biography of Charles II, full of sturdy history and enough salacious information to keep it interesting."
Jordan and Walsh (White Cargo: The Forgotten History of Britain's White Slaves in America, 2007, etc.) look deeper into England's "Merry Monarch" and his character—or lack thereof.Read full book review >
THE MEDICI by Paul Strathern
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 2016

"A fantastically comprehensive history covering the breadth of the great learning, art, politics, and religion of the period."
The prolific author continues to do what he does best—bring history to wondrous life—with this thorough history of the Medici family, the stimulus and backbone of the Renaissance. Read full book review >
THE MAKING OF THE AMERICAN ESSAY by John D’Agata
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 15, 2016

"The editors of the Norton anthologies need not worry: their position in literature and in the market remains secure."
A literary anthology and textbook incorporating some three dozen presumably teachable essays—some of which are not essays at all. Read full book review >
50 GREAT AMERICAN PLACES by Brent D. Glass
HISTORY
Released: March 15, 2016

"An enlightening trip with an expert guide."
A journey in search of the nation's history. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 2016

"Much of this ground has otherwise been covered, and better, in Greil Marcus' Invisible Republic (1997). Still, fans of 1960s and '70s rock and music history buffs will find this a pleasure."
Veteran music writer Hoskyns (Led Zeppelin: The Oral History of the World's Greatest Rock Band, 2012, etc.) peels back the layers of a musical Shangri-La that has plenty of dark corners.Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 15, 2016

"Although academic and largely unspecific, the book offers much fodder for the running debate about America's role in the world."
Understanding the naïve, distorted prism through which the United States views the rest of the world. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >