History Book Reviews (page 2)

BITTER FREEDOM by Maurice Walsh
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"An excellent history, but more importantly, a sharply written portrait of a people and their long struggle to survive."
Walsh (Journalism/Kingston Coll.; The News from Ireland: Foreign Correspondents and the Irish Revolution, 2008) digs into the heart of the fight to establish an Irish Republic.Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 17, 2016

"A thoroughly impressive debut."
In his first book, a former infantry sergeant-turned-historian surveys more than 200 years of the administration of American military justice. Read full book review >

THE GENE by Siddhartha Mukherjee
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"Sobering, humbling, and extraordinarily rich reading from a wise and gifted writer who sees how far we have come—but how much farther we have to go to understand our human nature and destiny."
A panoramic history of the gene and how genetics "resonate[s] far beyond the realms of science." Read full book review >
LABOR OF LOVE by Moira Weigel
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"An earnest plea to think about love mindfully."
Dating undermines authenticity, the author claims. Read full book review >
THE BITTER TASTE OF VICTORY by Lara Feigel
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"A deep, significant exploration of artistic atonement in postwar Germany."
An elucidating cultural study explores the ways artists forged a sense of redemption—both personal and societal—from the devastation of post-World War II Germany. Read full book review >

WALKING POINT by Perry A. Ulander
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"A compulsively readable book for anyone who lived through the Vietnam era—or who wants an idea of what it was like."
A former GI recalls his tour of duty in Vietnam, and it's not quite the story readers may expect. Read full book review >
THE BOYS IN THE BUNKHOUSE by Dan Barry
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"Gently, empathetically, and indelibly, Barry conveys a tale of unthinkable brutality."
A gripping indictment of society's treatment of "losers." Read full book review >
THE NAZI HUNTERS by Andrew Nagorski
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"Packed with the tangled, riveting detail of the many cases, this is more sensational reading than astute legal analysis—but absorbing nonetheless."
A detailed look at the grim work of tracking Nazis over the decades since World War II. Read full book review >
THE MONEY CULT by Chris Lehmann
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"Lehmann makes an important and timely point, which is that American religion has always been about money."
A lively study of how the prim Puritans of old, "tireless strivers after divine favor and sticklers for political order," became the mega-churchy materialists of today. Read full book review >
PAPER by Mark Kurlansky
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"Kurlansky has been breezier in the past, a better stylistic choice for books with this level of detail to become absorbing reads."
Kurlansky (City Beasts: Fourteen Stories of Uninvited Wildlife, 2015, etc.), who chronicles world history and human advancement via one telling topic at a time, chooses paper for his latest undertaking. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 15, 2016

"Great fun for anyone with even a slight knowledge of Roman and English history and geography—or those curious about them."
A delightful trip from Rome to Hadrian's Wall—in C.E. 130. Read full book review >
THE POLITICIANS AND THE EGALITARIANS by Sean Wilentz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 11, 2016

"A master scholar delivers a delightfully stimulating historical polemic."
A stern, thoroughly satisfying harangue on the realities of politics in the United States by the veteran, prizewinning historian. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >