History Book Reviews (page 2)

WHISTLEBLOWER AT THE CIA by Melvin A. Goodman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 15, 2017

"The causes of Goodman's vitriol are indeed worrisome, but his countless repetitions grow wearisome."
A former CIA analyst (1966-1990) deplores what he argues is the increasing deleterious politicization of the agency. Read full book review >
CANNIBALISM by Bill Schutt
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"One takeaway: humans don't taste like chicken. A learned, accessible, and engaging approach to a meaty—beg pardon—and always-controversial subject."
Zoologist Schutt (Biology/LIU Post; Dark Banquet: Blood and the Curious Lives of Blood-Feeding Creatures, 2008) gets to the heart of the matter of a topic that makes people shudder. Read full book review >

STAND YOUR GROUND by Caroline E. Light
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A weighty consideration of the cultural politics behind disturbing flash points like the death of Trayvon Martin."
A legalistic polemic arguing that the "natural right" of self-defense has been perverted by American gun culture. Read full book review >
STALIN AND THE SCIENTISTS by Simon Ings
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A provocative and increasingly chilling work that shows how scientists in the nascent Soviet Union were sacrificed to the Soviet dream of building the ideal state."
Picking through a minefield of Soviet utopia and paranoia. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An exciting, suspenseful tale of international intrigue."
An elegant presentation of Winston Churchill's special guerrilla operations force, which consistently met the dirty exigencies of war. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An engrossing, haunting journey for bibliophiles and World War II historians."
An erudite exploration of the systematic plundering of libraries and book collections by Nazi invaders. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A startling, well-researched slave narrative that seriously questions the intentions of our first president."
The story of a favored slave of the Washingtons who had the "impudence" to flee a life of benevolent servitude. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A lively and edifying narrative with lessons for today."
In her first book, Purnell gets our nerve endings tingling with an exploration of the interplay of mind and body as seen through the lens of the Enlightenment. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An intimate, often affecting look back at a group of young men who established an American air superiority that persists to this day."
In his first book, a British journalist tells the story of the airmen who reduced the Third Reich to ashes. Read full book review >
FROM BACTERIA TO BACH AND BACK by Daniel C. Dennett
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Anyone interested in modern theories of the mind and consciousness has to reckon with Dennett. This book, dense but accessible, is as good a place as any to start."
The dean of consciousness-raising consciousness-explaining returns with another cleareyed exploration of the mind. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A sad, chilling work that displays a vigorous buildup and suspense."
The underreported story of 11 young African-American GIs captured and massacred in the winter of 1944 by the Germans in Wereth, Belgium. Read full book review >
GET WELL SOON by Jennifer Wright
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"There's no question that Wright has covered a lot of medical territory with good information; if only she had curbed her enthusiasm to pontificate."
A lightweight history of plagues from an author who is "invested in this study…because I think knowing how diseases have been combatted in the past will be helpful in the future." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >