History Book Reviews (page 3)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 21, 2016

"From interviews and archival documents, Lascher creates a seamless narrative of daring and dedication."
Two journalists caught in war and love. Read full book review >
WHITE TRASH by Nancy Isenberg
HISTORY
Released: June 21, 2016

"A riveting thesis supported by staggering research."
A rigorously researched study of the entrenched system of racial classification that dispels many myths about American national identity. Read full book review >

SHAKESPEARE'S FIRST FOLIO by Emma Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 15, 2016

"Perfect for the Folger Shakespeare Library's 2016 'First Folio!' tour celebrating the book's 400th anniversary."
A biography of the most valuable English-language book in the world. Read full book review >
THE KAMIKAZE HUNTERS by Will Iredale
HISTORY
Released: June 15, 2016

"An engaging history of an underreported facet of the Pacific war."
Surprising history of the "half-forgotten" British effort to help the United States end the war with Japan in 1945. Read full book review >
THE GREAT INVENTION by Ehsan Masood
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 15, 2016

"A welcome cross-examination of a concept that seems as natural as sunlight but that, like every other human construct, is shot through with both politics and flaws."
We all know that statistics can lie. But what about one of the greatest statistical measures of all, Gross Domestic Product? Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"Readers who enjoy English history will be happy to have this in their libraries."
A series of biographies of the women connected to Cliveden, the house made famous in the Profumo affair. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 14, 2016

"A stimulating look at the American Revolution by a diligent historian and talented writer."
A fresh view of Britain's attempt to quash an independence movement that didn't have to occur. Read full book review >
SHANGHAI GRAND by Taras Grescoe
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"Grescoe exuberantly captures the glamour and intrigue of a lost world."
An intrepid journalist in free-wheeling 1930s Shanghai. Read full book review >
SPIRAL by Mark Danner
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 14, 2016

"A chilling cautionary tale of Orwellian repercussions."
A somber examination of why the war on terror has stretched over 15 years and appears to have no end in sight. Read full book review >
THE STRANGE CAREER OF WILLIAM ELLIS by Karl Jacoby
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"An amazing tale that is indeed 'almost too strange to be true.'"
A remarkable historical detective story that unearths the life and times of a "trickster" African-American who was able to "pass," and strive spectacularly, as Latino. Read full book review >
A HOUSE FULL OF DAUGHTERS by Juliet Nicolson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"Readers interested in 19th- and early-20th-century society, especially that of the upper classes, will enjoy this picture of the privileged life, 'where loyalty, respect and equality are all held in the highest regard.'"
Nicolson (Abdication, 2012, etc.) traces seven generations of women connected to the Sackville Wests. Read full book review >
WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN by James Lee McDonough
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"A fine biography, welcome reading for any student of Civil War history."
A wide-ranging biography of the Civil War legend, a monster to some, a savior to others. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >