History Book Reviews (page 3)

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A largely untold, engrossing history of our nation's fraught, and unlikely, path to liberty."
European allies supplied arms, ammunition, uniforms, savvy commanders, engineers, and soldiers to aid the American Revolution. Read full book review >
WONDERLAND by Steven Johnson
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"There's an infectious spirit of delight in the prose, which matches the themes in a book that will engage even those not entirely convinced by its thesis to take a look from a different perspective."
An illumination of how civilization advances through the ways in which it plays. Read full book review >

WHERE MEMORY LEADS by Saul Friedländer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"Though dry in tone, the book is haunting in scope and depth."
A foremost Holocaust scholar carefully reflects on his harsh early years and lifelong academic mission in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Geneva, and Los Angeles. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"A quirky but always delightful social history that will convince most readers that social revolutions have been happening for a long time."
Most observers agree that the 20th century saw dazzling changes: the automobile, airplane, atom bomb, antibiotics, computers, space travel, the internet, and hundreds of other amazing advancements. What century can match that? Every one since 1000, responds veteran British social historian Mortimer, and he makes a convincing case. Read full book review >
SUCH A LOVELY LITTLE WAR by Marcelino Truong
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A first-rate work of graphic memoir dealing with a pivotal period in modern American history."
The early years of the Vietnam War through the eyes of a child, as rendered by the graphic artist he became. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Long, leisurely, and vastly entertaining."
The story of a 1913 Arctic expedition to investigate what the New York Tribune called "the last considerable mass of unknown land on our planet." Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A winning concluding volume in a series that does for Eleanor Roosevelt what Robert Caro has done for Lyndon Johnson."
Having already devoted more than 1,200 pages to the extraordinary life of Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) in two previous installments, the skilled biographer offers the final volume. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A few notable naval battles changed the course of wars, even history, but the clash at Hampton Roads transformed the nature of warfare itself and offered a glimpse of the 'grim modernity' Snow vividly captures."
The former editor-in-chief of American Heritage revisits an epochal battle in naval history. Read full book review >
BLACK ELK by Joe Jackson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 25, 2016

"Of much literary and historical merit and a fine addition to the shelves of anyone interested in this part of America's unhappy past."
Stirring, wide-ranging biography of the Sioux elder whose testimonials underlay "one of the twentieth century's most important documents on Native American culture." Read full book review >
AN IRON WIND by Peter Fritzsche
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 25, 2016

"As Elie Wiesel once said, the question after Auschwitz is not 'How is it possible to believe in God?' but 'how can one believe in man?' That question is at the heart of this powerful, riveting, wrenching history."
Witnesses to the Nazi war machine experienced "illusion, hope, anguish, and indifference." Read full book review >
OF ARMS AND ARTISTS by Paul Staiti
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"A lively, splendid history that captures the times with insight, acumen, and a juggler's finesse."
How American art inspired a young country. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"This first-rate journey into human trafficking, slavery, and familial bonding is an engrossing example of spirited, determined reportage."
A consummate chronicler of the American South spotlights the extraordinary history of two kidnapped African-American brothers enslaved as a circus sideshow act. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >