History Book Reviews (page 4)

LUCIE AUBRAC by Siân Rees
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2016

"A refreshing addition to World War II literature."
This biography illuminates for an English-speaking audience the lives of Lucie and Raymond Aubrac, heroes of the French Resistance of World War II. Read full book review >
DODGERLAND by Michael Fallon
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 2016

"Not a conventional championship-season kind of treatment but a thoughtful, comprehensive, and even deeply personal account of a boisterous era whose echoes remain loud, even painful."
The late-1970s Los Angeles Dodgers are a not-so-distant window through which we can view American culture, then and now. Read full book review >

MONEY CHANGES EVERYTHING by William N. Goetzmann
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 2016

"For the numerate and fiscally wonky, an accessible survey that does a fine job of reallocating past, present, and future."
A financial economist's view of credit, investment, speculation, and other matters of the pocketbook. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 2016

"Anyone who's longed to visit Lascaux or the caves of Cantabria will be eager to read von Petzinger's admirable efforts at cracking the code."
A young scholar brings fresh eyes and fascinating theses to the study of ancient rock art. Read full book review >
WHITE RAGE by Carol Anderson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 31, 2016

"A book that provides necessary perspective on the racial conflagrations in the U.S."
A close reading of America's racial chasm. Read full book review >

Ramadi Declassified by Tony Deane
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 30, 2016

"A detailed, compelling account of a little-known chapter in the Iraq War."
In this modern war memoir, a retired Army colonel recounts his experiences working to suppress terrorism in a strategic Iraqi city. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 24, 2016

"A readable popular history told largely through the actions of swashbuckling tycoons."
A biography of two unlikely oilmen from outside the United States who broke the global domination of John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil Company. Read full book review >
EAST WEST STREET by Philippe Sands
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 24, 2016

"For the future of humanity, forgetting, Sands insists in this vastly important book, is not an option."
An engrossing tale of family secrets and groundbreaking legal precedents. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 24, 2016

"A fresh, lively look at an obsessive desire to own a piece of the wild."
In her spirited debut book, a journalist recounts her quest for a coveted aquarium fish. Read full book review >
THE LAST ROYAL REBEL by Anna Keay
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 24, 2016

"A lively and probably definitive biography of an ill-fated Restoration notable."
Charles II sired 14 bastards but loved his first, James, most of all. Unfortunately, only legitimate children could inherit the throne. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 24, 2016

"Dispiriting but essential scholarly reading for students of early modern California."
It was no accident that California's Indians were slaughtered by the droves in the mid-19th century, writes UCLA historian Madley, but instead the product of design. Read full book review >
SECONDHAND TIME by Svetlana Alexievich
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 24, 2016

"Profoundly significant literature as history."
A lively, deeply moving cacophony of Russian voices for whom the Soviet era was as essential as their nature. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >