History Book Reviews (page 4)

CLEMENT ATTLEE by John Bew
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2017

"The 'invisible man' gets his well-deserved due in this thorough new biography."
Detailed, philosophical biography of the unprepossessing, longtime leader of the British Labour Party, who laid out a "new deal" for the postwar Britons and cut imperial ties. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 2017

"Though the narrative is occasionally as dense as a rain forest, it will be rich and rewarding for the determined explorer."
A philosophically and academically rigorous argument that charts one way to political reconciliation in these divisive times. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: March 1, 2017

"A small book, but powerful all out of proportion to its size in exposing a shameful history."
Mr. Hitler, meet Justice Holmes. Read full book review >
ORDINARY JEWS by Evgeny Finkel
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 2017

"Of much interest to students of modern history but also to those engaged in humanitarian relief efforts, refugee relocation, and the like."
A political scientist turns fresh eyes on the problem of how European Jews responded to the Holocaust as it was unfolding. Read full book review >
CIVIL WARS by David Armitage
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"An erudite work by a top-shelf scholar."
A probing examination of the history of civil war and why it matters to define it precisely. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"There are countless kernels of amazing achievement and courage throughout this jam-packed, engaging history."
A history of the federal push to bolster women's rights from successive presidents since John F. Kennedy—and the resulting clashes with traditional conservative constituencies. Read full book review >
DODGE CITY by Tom Clavin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"There's some rehashing of the old but much that is new, making this a must-have for buffs—nothing world-changing but a nicely spun Wild West yarn to satisfy even the most ardent consumer of oaters."
Of cowpokes, desperadoes, and the law in a Western town in which it wasn't always easy to tell which was which. Read full book review >
THE ALPS by Stephen O’Shea
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"This spirited jaunt into the peaks of Europe may inspire readers to pack their bags."
A tour through the Alps reveals history, geology, anthropology, and local customs. Read full book review >
FLÂNEUSE by Lauren Elkin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Enlightening walks through cities, cultural history, and a writer's heart and soul."
An American freelance essayist and translator living in Paris debuts with an appealing blend of memoir, scholarship, and cultural criticism. Read full book review >
THE INKBLOTS by Damion Searls
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Searls shows persuasively how the creation and reinvention of inkblots has reflected psychologists' scientific and cultural perspectives."
A history of 20th-century psychology focused on the life, work, and legacy of the inventor of the inkblot test. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Relentlessly positive in tone, Grande's narrative never dives deeply enough to reward readers' time."
Ronald Reagan's former personal assistant reminisces. Read full book review >
HOMO DEUS by Yuval Noah Harari
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A relentlessly fascinating book that is sure to become—and deserves to be—a bestseller."
In an intellectually provocative follow-up to Sapiens (2015), Harari (History/Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem) looks to the future. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >