History Book Reviews (page 5)

THE MIRROR TEST by J. Kael Weston
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 24, 2016

"Vivid pages soaked with blood, reverberating with cries of pain, loss, and regret."
A former U.S. State Department official who spent seven consecutive war years in Iraq and Afghanistan debuts with a damning memoir about our lies, failures, and horrors in the region. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"A forthright testimony by a witness to history."
Triumphs and frustrations mark the author's long legal career. Read full book review >

BITTER FREEDOM by Maurice Walsh
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"An excellent history, but more importantly, a sharply written portrait of a people and their long struggle to survive."
Walsh (Journalism/Kingston Coll.; The News from Ireland: Foreign Correspondents and the Irish Revolution, 2008) digs into the heart of the fight to establish an Irish Republic.Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 17, 2016

"A thoroughly impressive debut."
In his first book, a former infantry sergeant-turned-historian surveys more than 200 years of the administration of American military justice. Read full book review >
THE GENE by Siddhartha Mukherjee
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"Sobering, humbling, and extraordinarily rich reading from a wise and gifted writer who sees how far we have come—but how much farther we have to go to understand our human nature and destiny."
A panoramic history of the gene and how genetics "resonate[s] far beyond the realms of science." Read full book review >

LABOR OF LOVE by Moira Weigel
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"An earnest plea to think about love mindfully."
Dating undermines authenticity, the author claims. Read full book review >
THE BITTER TASTE OF VICTORY by Lara Feigel
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"A deep, significant exploration of artistic atonement in postwar Germany."
An elucidating cultural study explores the ways artists forged a sense of redemption—both personal and societal—from the devastation of post-World War II Germany. Read full book review >
WALKING POINT by Perry A. Ulander
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"A compulsively readable book for anyone who lived through the Vietnam era—or who wants an idea of what it was like."
A former GI recalls his tour of duty in Vietnam, and it's not quite the story readers may expect. Read full book review >
THE BOYS IN THE BUNKHOUSE by Dan Barry
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"Gently, empathetically, and indelibly, Barry conveys a tale of unthinkable brutality."
A gripping indictment of society's treatment of "losers." Read full book review >
THE NAZI HUNTERS by Andrew Nagorski
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"Packed with the tangled, riveting detail of the many cases, this is more sensational reading than astute legal analysis—but absorbing nonetheless."
A detailed look at the grim work of tracking Nazis over the decades since World War II. Read full book review >
THE MONEY CULT by Chris Lehmann
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"Lehmann makes an important and timely point, which is that American religion has always been about money."
A lively study of how the prim Puritans of old, "tireless strivers after divine favor and sticklers for political order," became the mega-churchy materialists of today. Read full book review >
PAPER by Mark Kurlansky
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"Kurlansky has been breezier in the past, a better stylistic choice for books with this level of detail to become absorbing reads."
Kurlansky (City Beasts: Fourteen Stories of Uninvited Wildlife, 2015, etc.), who chronicles world history and human advancement via one telling topic at a time, chooses paper for his latest undertaking. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >