History Book Reviews (page 5)

ELIZABETH by John Guy
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"One of the best biographies of Elizabeth ever."
The Whitbread Award-winning author delivers an outstanding biography of Queen Elizabeth (1533-1603). Read full book review >
THE WAR BEFORE INDEPENDENCE by Derek W. Beck
HISTORY
Released: May 3, 2016

"Revolutionary War fans will rejoice in this well-written work and hope that the author has more on the way."
Beck (Igniting the American Revolution: 1773-1775, 2015) continues his deeply detailed story of the American Revolution's beginnings.Read full book review >

THE LONG WEEKEND by Adrian Tinniswood
HISTORY
Released: May 3, 2016

"An enjoyable tour with a genial, informed, devoted docent."
A nostalgic account of life at English country houses during the interbellum era. Read full book review >
HOMINTERN by Gregory Woods
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 3, 2016

"An information-heavy book that provides a wonderful resource for those interested in learning about the rise of gay poetics at the onset of the 20th century."
A comprehensive anthropological survey exploring the ways in which the gay community has changed the world. Read full book review >
RED PLATOON by Clinton Romesha
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"Romesha ably captures the daily dangers faced by these courageous American soldiers in Afghanistan."
An account of the horrendous October 2009 attack on the American Combat Outpost Keating in Afghanistan, told in a frank, engaging vernacular by the staff sergeant and Medal of Honor winner. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 3, 2016

"Spirited, witty, and ferociously incisive."
Bitch Media co-founder and creative director Zeisler (Feminism and Pop Culture, 2008) ruminates about how the current wave of feminism does not "challenge beliefs…so much as it offers nips and tucks."Read full book review >
ONEIDA by Ellen Wayland-Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A smartly contextualized tale of 'the tension between radical social critique and unapologetic accommodation...between communal harmony and individual striving.'"
A study of the unlikely origins of one of America's most recognizable brands. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 2, 2016

"An important book that not only shows how the slave trade operated, but also provides a clearer picture of the victims' origins, language, and methods of survival."
A history of how captives purchased in Africa for transport on the slave ship Hare managed to maintain a community after being sold into slavery.Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 2, 2016

"A thoughtful historical study of the entrenched symbolism of a dreaded bridge in Mississippi, a landmark that 'fixed attention on Jim Crow's brutal excesses and unresolved legacies.'"
History of the most notorious sites in Mississippi for white-on-black violence, from 1918 to 1966. Read full book review >
TRACK CHANGES by Matthew G. Kirschenbaum
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 2, 2016

"Materiality, information, and absence: as Kirschenbaum rightly notes, literature is 'different after word processing,' and so is literary history. He makes a solid start in showing how."
A learned and lively study of the sometimes-uneasy fit between writing on a computer and writing generally. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2016

"A lively history of one man's indelible imprint on American news."
The peripatetic life of a newspaper mogul. Read full book review >
THE CASTAWAY'S WAR by Stephen Harding
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2016

"An amazing journey through adversity and desperation."
A suspenseful recounting of the torpedoing of the USS Strong in the South Pacific in July 1943 and one soldier's subsequent eluding of capture on the Japanese-held Solomon Islands.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >