History Book Reviews (page 6)

TROUBLED REFUGE by Chandra Manning
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"Manning conveys in gritty detail the fraught alliance between refugees and their military protectors."
A history of slaves who took refuge with the Union Army on their journey to freedom. Read full book review >
A SQUARE MEAL by Andrew Coe
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"A highly readable, illuminating look at the many ramifications of feeding the hungry in hard times."
A history of the struggle to put food on American tables during the Great Depression. Read full book review >

THE STORY OF EGYPT by Joann Fletcher
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 15, 2016

"The authoritative author imparts her vast knowledge in an orderly chronology and lively, intimate history. A perfect choice for budding Egyptologists."
A sweeping look at this epic history emphasizing the role of women rulers. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 15, 2016

"Pungent, embittered, eye-opening observations of a conflict involving lessons still unlearned."
A scathing dispatch from an embedded journalist in Afghanistan. Read full book review >
THE HOLOCAUST by Jeremy Black
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 14, 2016

"A compact and cogent academic account of the Holocaust."
In less than 250 pages, a prolific scholar takes on the intractably difficult themes of the Holocaust. Read full book review >

THE GLAMOUR OF STRANGENESS by Jamie James
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Abundant primary sources inform James' sharply drawn, sympathetic portraits."
Six artists in quest of the exotic. Read full book review >
HOW EVERYTHING BECAME WAR AND THE MILITARY BECAME EVERYTHING by Rosa Brooks
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Legal theorists and policymakers will approve the scholarship and close analysis; general readers will appreciate the sensitive storytelling, the wit, and the uncommon good sense."
A former senior Defense Department adviser explores the military's expanded role in a time when the lines between war and peace are dangerously blurred. Read full book review >
UTOPIA DRIVE by Erik Reece
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Compelling narratives with a personal voice, with some utopian political bite."
A journalist and author drives his truck around the East visiting utopian communities—past and present—and concludes we need to think more like those folks. Read full book review >
SPIES IN THE CONGO by Susan Williams
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"A fine complement to other accounts of wartime efforts to keep atomic weapons from the Germans—e.g., most recently, Neal Bascomb's The Winter Fortress (2016)."
Dogged examination of the official American and British wartime interest in keeping valuable uranium ore from the Belgian Congo out of Nazi hands. Read full book review >
PICKETT'S CHARGE by Phillip Thomas Tucker
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Blemished by repetitive prose and a needlessly bumptious tone, Tucker's narrative nevertheless contains much to interest and provoke Civil War enthusiasts."
A popular historian deconstructs "the greatest assault of the greatest battle of America's greatest war." Read full book review >
FROM WASHINGTON TO MOSCOW by Louis Sell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 5, 2016

"A rare and intimate look at Gorbachev and the events leading up to his presidency, this is a minor but thoughtful addition to the long shelf of Cold War books."
A chronicle of the final years of the Cold War and its lingering aftermath. Read full book review >
OUR FAMILY DREAMS by Daniel Blake Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Incomparable sources make for an unusually intimate American portrait."
The lives and fortunes of ambitious 19th-century brothers. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >