History Book Reviews (page 6)

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An engrossing, haunting journey for bibliophiles and World War II historians."
An erudite exploration of the systematic plundering of libraries and book collections by Nazi invaders. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A startling, well-researched slave narrative that seriously questions the intentions of our first president."
The story of a favored slave of the Washingtons who had the "impudence" to flee a life of benevolent servitude. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A lively and edifying narrative with lessons for today."
In her first book, Purnell gets our nerve endings tingling with an exploration of the interplay of mind and body as seen through the lens of the Enlightenment. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An intimate, often affecting look back at a group of young men who established an American air superiority that persists to this day."
In his first book, a British journalist tells the story of the airmen who reduced the Third Reich to ashes. Read full book review >
FROM BACTERIA TO BACH AND BACK by Daniel C. Dennett
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Anyone interested in modern theories of the mind and consciousness has to reckon with Dennett. This book, dense but accessible, is as good a place as any to start."
The dean of consciousness-raising consciousness-explaining returns with another cleareyed exploration of the mind. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A sad, chilling work that displays a vigorous buildup and suspense."
The underreported story of 11 young African-American GIs captured and massacred in the winter of 1944 by the Germans in Wereth, Belgium. Read full book review >
GET WELL SOON by Jennifer Wright
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"There's no question that Wright has covered a lot of medical territory with good information; if only she had curbed her enthusiasm to pontificate."
A lightweight history of plagues from an author who is "invested in this study…because I think knowing how diseases have been combatted in the past will be helpful in the future." Read full book review >
AGE OF ANGER by Pankaj Mishra
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A probing, well-informed investigation of global unrest calling for 'truly transformative thinking' about humanity's future."
How the failures of capitalism have led to "fear, confusion, loneliness and loss"—and global anger. Read full book review >
SINGAPORE by John Curtis Perry
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 6, 2017

"A brief, affectionate history of Singapore that provides a compelling but incomplete and surprisingly discursive portrait of the island nation."
The history of Singapore's improbable path to becoming an economically powerful city-state. Read full book review >
GUIDEBOOKS TO SIN by Pamela D. Arceneaux
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 3, 2017

"Rare and vivid evidence of the thriving business of pleasure."
From 1897 to 1917, prostitution operated legally in a district of New Orleans known as Storyville. Beautifully produced by the Historic New Orleans Collection, this abundantly illustrated history of turn-of-the-century prostitution offers an unusual and fascinating glimpse into America's past. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"An accomplished, authoritative history of American liberalism."
The history of a Washington, D.C., residence that served as a crucible for liberal ideas and strategies. Read full book review >
DEMOCRACY by David A. Moss
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"A sterling educational tool that offers a fresh presentation of how 'democracy in America has always been a contact sport.'"
A vigorous civics lesson of 19 case studies that illustrate America's evolving democratic processes and institutions. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >