History Book Reviews (page 6)

DARK PLACES OF THE EARTH by Jonathan M. Bryant
HISTORY
Released: July 13, 2015

"A richly documented work that restores the Antelope to its central place in the long, grim history of the Atlantic slave trade."
The little-known story of a slave ship, the fate of its captives, and its place in American history. Read full book review >
BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME by Ta-Nehisi Coates
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 8, 2015

"This moving, potent testament might have been titled 'Black Lives Matter.' Or: 'An American Tragedy.'"
The powerful story of a father's past and a son's future. Read full book review >

VENDETTA by James Neff
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 7, 2015

"The sordid, sweeping history of what Kennedy insider Pierre Salinger dubbed 'a blood feud.'"
Seattle Times investigations editor Neff (The Wrong Man: The Final Verdict on the Dr. Sam Sheppard Murder Case, 2001, etc.) turns his attention to the visceral war of wills between Bobby Kennedy and Jimmy Hoffa.Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 7, 2015

"Lovers of Russian literature and music will find this valuable, and history buffs will get a fearsome picture of life under Stalin."
Independent senior reporter McSmith (No Such Thing as Society: A History of Britain in the 1980s, 2010, etc.) explores how arts and artists in Russia somehow managed to flourish despite Joseph Stalin's iron control. Read full book review >
INDEPENDENCE LOST by Kathleen DuVal
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 7, 2015

"An illuminating history of events, many barely mentioned in history books and none, unlike our Revolution, with happy endings."
An informative and disturbing account of a little-known campaign during the Colonial rebellion. Read full book review >

LIFE’S GREATEST SECRET by Matthew Cobb
HISTORY
Released: July 7, 2015

"The greatest milestone in 20th-century biology received an iconic account in Horace Freeland Judson's The Eighth Day of Creation (1979). Much has happened since that publication, and Cobb's gripping, insightful history, often from the mouths of the participants themselves, updates the story, bringing it all the way into the present."
Animal breeders have always known that "like breeds like," but no one, Charles Darwin included, knew why offspring resemble parents except, sometimes, when they don't. Cobb (Zoology/Univ. of Manchester; Eleven Days in August: The Liberation of Paris 1944, 2014, etc.) describes how they learned.Read full book review >
THE JEWISH OLYMPICS by Ron Kaplan
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 7, 2015

"A useful guide to a significant sporting event that was 'born out of exclusion and anti-Semitism.'"
The sports and features editor for the New Jersey Jewish News compiles a thorough history of a unique international sporting event. Read full book review >
MEANWHILE THERE ARE LETTERS by Suzanne Marrs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 7, 2015

"An intimate, luminous portrait of a friendship."
Tender letters reveal interwoven literary lives. Read full book review >
A FULL LIFE by Jimmy Carter
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 7, 2015

"A memoir that reads like an epilogue to a life of accomplishment."
Notes at 90 from a former president at peace. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: July 7, 2015

"An intricate, mesmerizing portrayal of the KGB-CIA spy culture."
A thoroughly researched excavation of an astoundingly important (and sadly sacrificed) spy for the CIA during the low point of the 1970s. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: July 7, 2015

"A fascinating biography of a physicist who transformed how science is done."
Europe's Large Hadron Collider cost more than $10 billion, paid for by a consortium of nations. Its success owes much to charismatic physicist Ernest Lawrence (1901-1958), who invented the cyclotron, the Collider's ancestor. Read full book review >
THE PAWNBROKER'S DAUGHTER by Maxine Kumin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 6, 2015

"Kumin and her husband experienced an idyllic life on their 200-acre horse farm in New Hampshire, 'living a wide-open lifestyle.' Happily, she shared that life with the rest of us through her writing."
A posthumous publication of five essays by former Poet Laureate Kumin (And Short the Seasons: Poems, 2014, etc.), who died in 2014.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >