History Book Reviews (page 8)

BRILLIANT BEACONS by Eric Jay Dolin
HISTORY
Released: April 18, 2016

"A delightful journey with excellent sketches, renderings, and resources for museums and organizations."
A fine history of lighthouses, "among the most beloved and romanticized structures in the American landscape." Read full book review >
CONGRESS, PRESIDENTS, AND AMERICAN POLITICS by Lee H. Hamilton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 18, 2016

"The book—essentially an encapsulation of the author's philosophy of politics and politicians—is a good choice for those who want to believe in government again."
A U.S. Representative from Indiana for 34 years reviews the best of the commentaries he sent to his constituents during his years in office. Read full book review >

THE PRAGMATIC SUPERPOWER by Ray Takeyh
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 18, 2016

"Contestable yet compelling arguments regarding the state of the 'precarious…global scene' following World War II."
A singular take on U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East from World War II to the Gulf War demonstrates how a kind of accidental success was achieved by isolating the Soviet Union and avoiding prolonged U.S. entanglements. Read full book review >
THE EMPRESS OF ART by Susan Jaques
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 15, 2016

"An intriguing biography of a ruler whose ruthlessness encompassed art."
The self-aggrandizing Catherine II (1729-1796) was an obsessive, voracious collector. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 15, 2016

"An engaging travelogue that provides a good example of how one person tirelessly pursued his dream to fruition."
A parallel narrative of French explorer René-Robert Cavelier La Salle's 1680s trek to the mouth of the Mississippi River and an intrepid 1976 journey by a group of Midwestern youth. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 13, 2016

"An elegant, astute study that is both readable and thematically rich."
A portrait of Thomas Jefferson's passionate belief in Enlightenment values and how it determined his personal character and that of the young nation. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 12, 2016

"As fascinated as Snare with the portrait, Cumming has fashioned an absorbing mystery."
A true tale that demonstrates the power and seduction of art. Read full book review >
THE LADY WITH THE BORZOI by Laura Claridge
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 12, 2016

"A straightforward recounting of the difficult life of a woman of discerning literary taste."
A prestigious publishing house and the strong-willed woman who guided it. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 12, 2016

"Racism is the enduring scar on the American consciousness. In this ambitious, magisterial book, Kendi reveals just how deep that scar cuts and why it endures, its barely subcutaneous pain still able to flare."
An accomplished history of racist thought and practice in the United States from the Puritans to the present. Read full book review >
THE MOST PERFECT THING by Tim Birkhead
HISTORY
Released: April 12, 2016

"One doesn't have to be a bird enthusiast to relish this book, but it would be the most perfect gift for anyone who is."
A thrilling voyage through what most of us think of as an ordinary item sold at the supermarket. Read full book review >
RISE OF THE ROCKET GIRLS by Nathalia Holt
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 12, 2016

"A fresh contribution to women's history."
The history of women as vital contributors to advancements in early space exploration. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 12, 2016

"This eye-opening exposure of the abuse of the indigenous peoples of America is staggering; that the mistreatment continued into the 20th century is beyond disturbing."
We all know that Christopher Columbus and his successors enslaved the natives in the New World. Reséndez (History/Univ. of California, Davis; A Land So Strange: The Epic Journey of Cabeza de Vaca, 2009, etc.) exposes the broad brush that the "other slavery" wielded.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >