History Book Reviews (page 8)

Part of the Family by Jason Hensley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 14, 2016

"An invaluable illumination of small acts of astonishing bravery and generosity in the darkest days of war."
A compassionate, detailed account of a little-known corner of World War II history. Read full book review >
THE POLITICIANS AND THE EGALITARIANS by Sean Wilentz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 11, 2016

"A master scholar delivers a delightfully stimulating historical polemic."
A stern, thoroughly satisfying harangue on the realities of politics in the United States by the veteran, prizewinning historian. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"A lively account of our Revolution's most reviled figure."
A history of the American Revolution, focused on George Washington (1732-1799) and Benedict Arnold (1741-1801), in which the author acknowledges Arnold's good points but does not fully rehabilitate him. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"A rousing and robust story about the immortal charge and the significant role played in the war by Theodore Roosevelt, the only American president to be awarded the Medal of Honor."
One of the "iconic moments in American history" is scrutinized in heroic detail. Read full book review >
THE SECRET WAR by Max Hastings
HISTORY
Released: May 10, 2016

"A masterful account of wartime skulduggery that has relevance still today."
Taking a break with Catastrophe: 1914 (2013), veteran military historian Hastings returns to World War II with the usual entirely satisfying results.Read full book review >

SUSPECTED OF INDEPENDENCE by David McKean
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"For students of the Revolutionary era, the author delivers a useful biography of a significant player in the birth pangs of the new nation."
A descendant of little-known Founding Father Thomas McKean (1734-1817) places him "in the context of his times." Read full book review >
MACARTHUR AT WAR by Walter R. Borneman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"A no-holds-barred portrait of a controversial figure and a feast for World War II aficionados."
An examination of the reputation of Douglas MacArthur (1880-1964), at one point the most admired of all the generals on the Allied side of World War II. Read full book review >
THE ROMANOVS by Simon Sebag Montefiore
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"A magisterial portrayal of these 'megalomaniacs, monsters and saints' as eminently human and fallible."
A lively work illustrating the personalities, sensuality, and steely wills of the long line of Russian rulers. Read full book review >
A SELF-MADE MAN by Sidney Blumenthal
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"A consummate political observer keenly dissects the machinations of Lincoln's incredible rise to power."
The first volume in a study of Abraham Lincoln, professional politician. Read full book review >
INDIA'S WAR by Srinath Raghavan
HISTORY
Released: May 10, 2016

"World War II was a crucible that forged the modern identities of South Asian nations in ways rarely acknowledged since. While overlong, this book illuminates that period."
Though the story is overshadowed today by the cataclysmic aftereffects of independence and partition, India during World War II raised the largest volunteer fighting force in history, ineluctably altering the nation's social structure and political makeup. Read full book review >
THE PRESIDENTS AND THE CONSTITUTION by Ken Gormley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 10, 2016

"A useful, educational tome featuring top-drawer contributors—though female scholars are woefully underrepresented."
A fluidly fashioned collection of essays about how the roster of American presidents shaped the executive duties as defined in the Constitution. Read full book review >
FIRST DADS by Joshua Kendall
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"Rich in detail, this informative book gives new understanding to our nation's leaders and their offspring."
A look at the parenting practices of American presidents. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >