History Book Reviews (page 8)

HISTORY
Released: March 3, 2015

"A great conversation starter with plenty of room for more research and elaboration.
"
Boin (Ancient and Late Antique Mediterranean History/Saint Louis Univ.; Ostia in Late Antiquity, 2013) puts forth a different perception of early Roman Christians and their effects on the empire.Read full book review >
THE DISINHERITED by Robert Sackville-West
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 3, 2015

"Sympathetic to the protagonists' plight, Sackville-West hones a well-crafted narrative of intrigue, betrayal and greed."
An aristocratic family's scandalous past. Read full book review >

ROOSEVELT AND STALIN by Susan Butler
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 3, 2015

"A thorough account of the alliance between two very different leaders, although written with an extreme pro-Soviet tilt."
A comprehensive study of the wartime cooperation between the United States and the Soviet Union, as directed by Franklin Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 3, 2015

"An uneven but useful chronicle of a far-fetched history whose woeful truth is only now emerging."
A multilayered, mystifying exposé of how the CIA infiltrated and ultimately directed the U.S. National Student Association in thwarting international communist goals from 1950 to 1967. Read full book review >
SHERMAN'S GHOSTS by Matthew Carr
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 3, 2015

"Carr not only examines the campaigns and career of Sherman; he also attacks the mindsets and assumptions that have continued to allow America to rationalize its wars."
William Tecumseh Sherman's brutal March to the Sea was not the first military rampage against civilians—even in the United States—but it continues to attract attention and comments from military leaders. Read full book review >

THE DEATH OF CAESAR by Barry Strauss
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 3, 2015

"Once again, Strauss takes us deep into the psyche of ancient history in an exciting, twisted tale that is sure to please."
Master historian Strauss (History and Classics/Cornell Univ.; Masters of Command: Hannibal, Alexander, Caesar and the Genius of Leadership, 2012, etc.) zeroes in on the few years surrounding Julius Caesar's assassination and delves into the strengths of the characters involved.Read full book review >
SYRIA by John McHugo
HISTORY
Released: March 3, 2015

"Scholarly but accessible and of much interest to those with an eye on geopolitical matters."
Sober-minded history of a nation that has existed in its present form for less than a century, one "predestined to descend into chaos and civil war." Read full book review >
EXPLORING LINCOLN by Harold Holzer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 2, 2015

"A thoughtful treat for the Lincoln and Civil War crowds."
Noted historians reflect on the life and presidency of Abraham Lincoln. Read full book review >
TOO HOT TO HANDLE by Jonathan Zimmerman
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 2015

"An informative, occasionally dry account of the attempts to educate the world about human sexual relations."
A chronological narrative of sex education around the world. Read full book review >
Auschwitz #34207 by Nancy Sprowell Geise
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2015

"A riveting, well-documented account of survival that's harrowing, inspiring and unforgettable."
Debut biographer Geise (The Eighth Sea, 2012) tells the remarkable story of Joe Rubinstein, a survivor of the Holocaust. Read full book review >
A BRIEF STOP ON THE ROAD FROM AUSCHWITZ by Göran Rosenberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"A deeply felt story and a sobering reminder of the long shadows of the Holocaust."
A searing survivor's tale told by a son. Read full book review >
ELEANOR MARX by Rachel Holmes
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"A full-fleshed, thrilling portrait, troubling and full of family secrets."
The extraordinary life of Karl Marx's feisty feminist youngest daughter told with passionate sympathy and conviction. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >