History Book Reviews (page 8)

DEMOCRACY by Paul Cartledge
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2016

"No library should be without this wonderful book, in which Cartledge has abundantly shared his love and knowledge of ancient Greece with us."
A compact but rich education in classics and democracy, from a leading expert who delights in his subject. Read full book review >
EYEING THE RED STORM by Robert M. Dienesch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2016

"While WS-117L was not entirely successful, Dienesch asserts in this solid, specialized scholarly study, it laid the foundation for the U.S. space effort for the next 40 years."
A study of how the Dwight Eisenhower administration created the first U.S. satellite reconnaissance mission. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2016

"A well-forged thesis builds a strong argument for the ongoing significance of this foreign policy."
A sharply drawn contrast study of the twin engines behind America's post-World War II vision in foreign policy. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2016

"Though a balanced, objective study of the case would be useful and illuminating, Grumet does provide a readable look at the nitty-gritty of New York's political machine."
Post-mortem of an unusual Supreme Court case regarding the separation of church and state. Read full book review >
MISSION FAILURE by Michael Mandelbaum
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 2016

"A skilled, persuasive appraisal of a unique moment in our foreign policy history."
An international affairs expert charts America's largely unsuccessful foreign interventions over the past 20 years. Read full book review >

A DISTANT HEARTBEAT by Eunice Lipton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2016

"Flawed but well-researched and often stirring."
An art historian's account of the research she undertook to understand the life of a mysterious uncle. Read full book review >
HEADS by Jesse Jarnow
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 2016

"Latter-day heads—as well as 'relentless dabblers' and the historically minded—will enjoy this well-researched, mind-altering excursion."
A history of the interplay between hallucinogens and rock music in the innocent minds of young America. Read full book review >
KICK KENNEDY by Barbara Leaming
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2016

"Leaming doesn't present much new for Kennedy buffs, but the age of Downton Abbey offers fresh context for this story of American royalty and its more tradition-minded British counterpart."
A biography of the comparatively unheralded sister closest in age to John F. Kennedy strains to find something new to say about the Kennedy clan. Read full book review >
FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT by Roger Daniels
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 30, 2016

"An excellent resource that hews to the president's words as reflecting or obscuring his actions."
A fine, fully fleshed portrait of Franklin Roosevelt during his final years, in his own words. Read full book review >
SPAIN IN OUR HEARTS by Adam Hochschild
HISTORY
Released: March 29, 2016

"Hochschild ably explores subtle shades of the conflict that contemporary authors and participants did not want to consider."
A nuanced look at the messy international allegiances forged during the Spanish Civil War. Read full book review >
FREDERICK THE GREAT by Tim Blanning
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 29, 2016

"While the sections about Frederick's childhood and reign are well-written and informative, it is the war coverage that will win over readers looking for a different view of the Seven Years' War."
Prussia owes its reputation as the personification of militarism to Frederick the Great (1712-1786), who, though mocked by his own father as a weakling, foreshadowed Napoleon's military genius. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 29, 2016

"A masterly work best suited to those who study marketing and are undaunted by the dense, detailed narrative."
A wide-ranging exposition of the human life of buying, selling, and trading from the Renaissance until now. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 5, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >