History Book Reviews (page 9)

IN THESE TIMES by Jenny Uglow
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"A vivid portrait of citizens who gave priority to day-to-day lives but rarely forgot they were engaged in the greatest war in history."
A fascinating account of how Britons lived through a generation of war. Read full book review >
A FIFTY-YEAR SILENCE by Miranda Richmond Mouillot
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"A moving family history researched with dedication and completed with a granddaughter's love."
Unearthing her grandparents' mysterious 50-year estrangement forms the foundation for translator and editor Mouillot's memoir. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"Based in part on interviews with camp survivors, Russell documents in chilling detail a shocking story of national betrayal."
Texas Monthly contributing editor Russell (Lady Bird: A Biography of Mrs. Johnson, 1999, etc.) recounts a dark episode in America's past in this engrossing history of the forced detention of thousands of civilians in internment camps during World War II.Read full book review >
KILLERS OF THE KING by Charles Spencer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"A gripping account of the aftermath of Britain's revolution, during which both sides fought for justice and Christianity and behaved despicably."
C.V. Wedgwood's masterwork told this story in three volumes, but Britain's Charles I (1600-1649) loses his head on Page 55 of this fascinating, one-volume account in which British historian Spencer (Prince Rupert: The Last Cavalier, 2008, etc.) describes what happened afterward.Read full book review >
CHASING THE SCREAM by Johann Hari
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"A compassionate and humane argument to overturn draconian drug policies."
Award-winning journalist Hari's multistrand examination of the war on drugs, spanning 100 years from inception to the present day. Read full book review >

THE EVIL HOURS by David J. Morris
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"An eye-opening investigation of war's casualties."
An exploration of the enduring human cost of war. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"Ashton makes compelling arguments about creativity and genius but continues to belabor them long after readers have gotten the point."
As a writer on technology and coiner of the phrase "the Internet of Things," Ashton seems to be a particularly creative type. But the "secret" of the subtitle is that there is no secret, no magic and no mystery. Read full book review >
ONCE UPON A REVOLUTION by Thanassis Cambanis
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"A clear exposition and analysis of complex, swiftly changing events. The book gives readers cause to understand why we might support regime change in the Middle East, even if it brings instability and incoherence."
Smart, troubling study of the events surrounding Tahrir Square and their aftermath. Read full book review >
GATEWAY TO FREEDOM by Eric Foner
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 19, 2015

"Foner brings to life fraught decades of contention, brutality and amazing acts of moral courage."
New sources reveal the perilous journeys of fugitive slaves. Read full book review >
F.B. EYES by William J. Maxwell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 18, 2015

"An occasionally intriguing work whose organization and diction consign it to reference status."
Maxwell (English and African-American Studies, Washington Univ.; New Negro, Old Left: African-American Writing and Communism between the Wars, 1999) reveals the obsession of the late FBI director with the lives and literature of leading black writers.Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 18, 2015

"A sophisticated, densely referenced, scholarly take on the perennial traits of human deceit and dishonesty."
An intellectual discourse on the essence and history of duplicity. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 16, 2015

"Organized, accessible history for everyone."
This populist study of recent speeches, films and published works reveals the many uses of America's founding ideals. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >