History Book Reviews (page 9)

HISTORY
Released: Dec. 2, 2016

"A fresh, if challenging, perspective on a neglected historical topic."
The final part of Janssens' (Maneuver and Battle in the Mexican Revolution: A Revolution in Military Affairs, Volume 2, 2016, etc.) comprehensive and iconoclastically revisionist interpretation of the Mexican Revolutionary War. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 2016

"A detailed, well-researched book presented in a logical fashion—will appeal most to Pearl Harbor scholars and those interested in submarine warfare."
The story of the first ship sunk by a Japanese submarine that demonstrates the careful planning and remarkable success of the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. Read full book review >

Marie Antoinette's Darkest Days by Will Bashor
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 2016

"Impressive, well-researched, useful, and accessible, though some readers may feel that the book's sympathies for the doomed queen remain misplaced."
This scholarly work thoroughly documents Marie Antoinette's imprisonment, trial, and execution. Read full book review >
RECOLLECTIONS by Olivier Zunz
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"In many ways as relevant as the day it was written and great fun to read."
A shrewd, on-the-ground account of how political change is made—and unmade—by the author of Democracy in America. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"An occasionally too-dense but impressively wide-ranging history demonstrating that the U.S.-China relationship began decades before Richard Nixon arrived on the scene."
An in-depth look at the historically deep and mutually influential relationship between the United States and China. Read full book review >

SEVEN DAYS OF INFAMY by Nicholas Best
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"A brisk, suspenseful World War II narrative from a proven storyteller."
In the latest in a wave of books about the Japanese attack, British author and former journalist Best (Five Days that Shocked the World: Eyewitness Accounts from Europe at the End of World War II, 2012, etc.) reaches around the world to ascertain what actually happened near and on Dec. 7, 1941. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"A solid demonstration of how an insistence on secrecy proved to be a fatal breakdown as the Japanese attack loomed. A good complement to Steve Twomey's Countdown to Pearl Harbor (2016)."
This evenhanded exposé of the scapegoating of the commander in chief of the Pacific fleet at the time of Pearl Harbor challenges official memory. Read full book review >
THE MAYOR OF MOGADISHU by Andrew Harding
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"A beautifully rendered narrative and characterization portrays the soul of a country few Westerners truly understand."
A fluid, sympathetic journalistic foray into the tumultuous history of Somalia as lived by an intriguing impresario and activist. Read full book review >
HOW TO SURVIVE A PLAGUE by David France
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"A lucid, urgent updating of Randy Shilts' And the Band Played On (1987) and a fine work of social history."
How scientists and citizens banded together to lift the death sentence from AIDS. Read full book review >
THE PURSUIT OF POWER by Richard J. Evans
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"An immensely readable work that considers incremental continental developments up to the outbreak of war in 1914."
A 100-year survey of European history that moves by transnational themes emphasizing "power"—over industrialization, class, selfhood, wages, and nature. Read full book review >
MEDIEVAL EUROPE by Chris Wickham
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"Far-ranging, fluent, and thoughtful—of considerable interest to students of history writ large, and not just of Europe."
A thorough survey of the European continent in the time between antiquity and modernity. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"A useful biographical portrait of an intriguing writer."
A literature scholar investigates the Jewish identity of novelist Irène Némirovsky (1903-1942). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >