History Book Reviews (page 9)

BULLETINS FROM DALLAS by Bill Sanderson
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"More interesting than Smith himself is the author's portrayal of the news business in the 1950s and '60s."
The life and work of a noted White House reporter. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A thoroughly researched, comprehensive look at the Civil War regiments who took the first step in the struggle to make their countrymen see them as intelligent, capable men."
The story of the black men, slaves and free, of the 54th and 55th Massachusetts Infantry, some of the greatest fighters of the Civil War. Read full book review >

SUCH A LOVELY LITTLE WAR by Marcelino Truong
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A first-rate work of graphic memoir dealing with a pivotal period in modern American history."
The early years of the Vietnam War through the eyes of a child, as rendered by the graphic artist he became. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A compelling examination of the long, divisive road to America's emergence, in 1919, as 'the most formidable power in the world.'"
A Pulitzer Prize-winning historian reveals America's evolution into nationhood. Read full book review >
COUNTDOWN TO PEARL HARBOR by Steve Twomey
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A well-researched study of an infamous moment that is still fascinating and controversial."
A highly detailed look at the tense buildup to Japan's "surprise" attack on Pearl Harbor becomes a study of how very unsurprising it really was. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A comprehensive collection of archival, police-related images."
Bultema's (Guardians of Angels, 2013) book collects photographs from a century-and-a-half of American law enforcement culture. Read full book review >
FOOD CITY by Joy Santlofer
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Rich, impeccably researched urban history with plenty of fun fodder for foodies."
A comprehensive history of New York City's food industry, from the late chair of New York University's Food Studies Program. Read full book review >
THE MISSING MATISSE by Pierre H. Matisse
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A candid portrayal of wartime privations is followed by a blur of unexamined events."
The grandson of artist Henri Matisse (1869-1954) recalls his adolescence in Nazi-occupied France. Read full book review >
ANCIENT WORLDS by Michael  Scott
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Scott teaches us that the past is a work in progress influenced by political and religious ideas and powerful rulers and individuals, and he proves that we need to continue to study and learn."
A welcome broadening of our understanding of antiquity. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Long, leisurely, and vastly entertaining."
The story of a 1913 Arctic expedition to investigate what the New York Tribune called "the last considerable mass of unknown land on our planet." Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A well-written, mostly engrossing tale of thwarted amateur treason underscoring the disturbing vulnerability of today's intelligence systems."
The account of an eccentric would-be traitor who executed a large-scale heist of American military secrets. Read full book review >
WHEN CHURCHILL SLAUGHTERED SHEEP AND STALIN ROBBED A BANK by Giles Milton
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Perfect for bathroom reading or a doctor's waiting room."
The British journalist continues to collect little-known events and factoids from history. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >