History Book Reviews (page 918)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1994

"They are not likely to be forgotten soon by readers."
The conviction earlier this year of Byron de la Beckwith for the 1963 murder of Medgar Evers provides a timeliness to this well- researched, fluidly written, and thoughtful book. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1994

"Worse, not a thought is entertained concerning the ethics or the possible illegality of many of these covert projects."
This latest in the flourishing genre of post-Cold War triumphalism argues that the various covert practices of the Reagan administration hastened the demise of an already decaying Soviet empire. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 1994

"Yet the book has merit largely because it graphically details the dismemberment of the democratic process in Chile."
Journalist Spooner presents a narrative of the Pinochet regime through profiles of the major government and opposition figures, many of whom she interviewed. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1994

"Webster's words will ring a resonant bell with the legions of GIs who rather enjoyed soldiering under fire but despised the military for its chickenshit rigidity."
It's a mystery why these splendid reminiscences of a gentleman ranker who served with the US Army's 101st Airborne Division in Europe during the climactic months of WW II were rejected by book publishers following their completion in the late 1940s. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 1994

"A useful compendium of important facts and issues confronting both countries; a less than convincing formula for their resolution."
An alternately helpful and debatable effort, by three analysts at the Inter-Hemispheric Education Resource Center in New Mexico, to elucidate the relationship between the United States and Mexico in the 1990s. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1994

"Critical yet fair scrutiny gives new life to an attractive, even Blakean figure who anticipated the Industrial Revolution's dark satanic mills."
Oxford philosopher/historian Berlin's strangest book, one that he set aside 25 years ago and had no wish to return to until editor Hardy intervened. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 29, 1994

"Simmons does not rise to the numerous occasions for satire and sick jokes, though the Lampoon's history is as warped and blackly comic as any of its creations."
Matty Simmons, the ousted chairman and founding father-figure of National Lampoon, has the corner office in his personal history of its first two twisted decades of reinventing American humor. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 29, 1994

"Superb and important—another ground-breaking achievement in research and narration for Trudeau, covering a period not often examined in depth by Civil War historians."
National Public Radio producer Trudeau (The Last Citadel, 1991; Bloody Roads South, 1989), completing a fine trilogy of works about the Civil War, recounts the turbulent collapse of the Confederacy in the months following Lee's surrender at Appomattox Courthouse. ``General readers are so taken with the simple drama of Appomattox,'' Trudeau writes in his preface, ``that many continue to believe that the Civil War ended with that incident.'' Nothing could be farther from the truth, according to Trudeau: At the time of Lee's surrender, Confederate armies were still in the field in North Carolina, Alabama, and the trans-Mississippi, and it was far from obvious to the leaders of the North that the Confederacy would not continue to fight, even though the Richmond government had fled after the collapse of Lee's army. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 27, 1994

"Light and lively fare—containing just enough facts to satisfy."
A bright, breezy, and opinionated look at how the Food and Drug Administration has handled and mishandled its job in the past decade. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 27, 1994

"Don't take ours''), he is not so conscience- stricken as to refrain from peddling what he has learned."
An interesting but nonetheless weak follow-up to Arden's (Wisdomkeepers, not reviewed) work on American Indian spirituality and values. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 26, 1994

"Written in unadorned, straightforward prose, this memoir is a testament to human fortitude, courage, and joy."
An inspiring story of an African-American double amputee aviator whose triumphs will impress even the most cynical and jaded of readers. Read full book review >
STALIN AGAINST THE JEWS by Arkady Vaksberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 22, 1994

"One hopes that a more comprehensive and comprehensible retelling of this story will become available soon."
Given the importance of its subject, relatively unexplored, and the talents of its author (The Prosecutor, 1991), this must be judged a major disappointment. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >