History Book Reviews (page 918)

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 17, 1995

"Miller reveals, but never really explores, the complexities and inconsistencies of a man who wrote both first-rate fiction and disposable prose."
An engaging, if unchallenging, account of an author whose route into—and out of—literary celebrity makes him seem, for better and worse, a man of his time. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 15, 1995

"A good, coolly analytical review of the Yugoslavian conflict."
A dispassionate, intelligent introduction to the civil war that has destroyed the former Yugoslavia. Read full book review >

THE DREAM OF WATER by Kyoko Mori
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 12, 1995

In a poetic and emotionally charged account of a journey back to her native Japan, Mori creates beautiful scenes even as she uncovers painful truths about her family and her past. Read full book review >
THE TWILIGHT OF DEMOCRACY by Patrick E. Kennon
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 12, 1995

"But his is a technocratic vision of national well-being."
A former CIA analyst hunts unsuccessfully for the reason why, if democracy seems so triumphant in the wake of communism's collapse, democratic nations such as the US, Japan, Germany, and the UK are suffering from angst and domestic discord. Read full book review >
DEMOCRACY ON TRIAL by Jean Bethke Elshtain
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 11, 1995

"But seldom have the sources of democracy and its discontents been described with such philosophical passion and insight."
Political philosopher Elshtain presents a lucid admonition that the frayed bonds of civility are leading to almost unbearable stress on America's democratic experiment. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 10, 1995

A cogently narrated personal exploration of the pain of raising black boys in a society that the author sees as fearing black men and indifferent to their survival. Read full book review >
1915 by Lyn Macdonald
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 10, 1995

"An estimable, resonant contribution to the WW I record, one which leaves no doubt that innocence as well as truth is among the first casualties when war comes to stay. (32 pages of photos, not seen; 20 maps)"
A harrowing account of the first full year of WW I, a watershed span during which it dawned on the British and their allies that global war was not a glorious adventure but a deadly serious business. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 10, 1995

"His own ambivalence toward junk is what gives this analysis its perverse but limited appeal."
A strangely equivocal morphology of detective fiction that reads every one of its considerable range of forms as a recurrence of a single, rigidly conventional formula. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 9, 1995

"A disappointing failure to explore a rich topic."
Nostalgia reigns in this account of how the film industry responded to WW II. Read full book review >
AMERICAN SOUL by Franz Schurmann
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 9, 1995

"Like Niebuhr, Schurmann can be both insightful and critical but is ultimately seduced by the very myths of the national character he seeks to critique."
Eloquent and occasionally touching reflections on the meaning of America by the son of immigrants. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 9, 1995

"Queen Victoria's life defined an age; unfortunately for this intelligent chronicle, the events of her death were not all that exciting."
This account of Queen Victoria's last two weeks of life is narrated in a candid, practical voice of which the common-sense queen would heartily have approved. Read full book review >
THE PRESIDENCY OF GERALD R. FORD by John Robert Greene
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 6, 1995

"A fair, balanced account of a troubled time and of a decent man whose efforts left the White House in better shape than he found it."
Gerald Ford comes across here as an average nice guy who was thrust into the hot seat of a banished president and who tried to heal a demoralized nation in the aftermath of Watergate and Vietnam. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >