History Book Reviews (page 918)

HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1995

An intriguing record of the contested, anxious decisions behind every brick of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1995

"Still, despite its limitations, for general readers Morgan's volume serves just fine. (maps, b&w illustrations, not seen)"
Stuffing a massive subject—in this case, the Anglo-American conquest of North America over the last two centuries—between the covers of a single volume is like teaching a cat to heel: It's a neat trick, but necessarily one of limited utility. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1995

"Virtually no appeal to the general reader, but essential reading to anthropologists caught up in the general theoretical upheaval affecting the discipline."
Round two in an academic fistfight concerning interpretations of the Hawaiian perception of Captain Cook (172879). Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1995

"While Yeti enthusiasts may be disappointed, Taylor-Ide has been where few have tread and emerges with a fascinating portrait. (b&w photos)"
Dispatches from the Yeti watch, with entertaining rambles into the deep, near-mythic valleys of Nepal. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"One senses from the volume that Tower shares Taylor's esteem for Lee, and it proves that indeed one can be a hero to one's valet after all."
An interesting collection of letters by a personal confidant of Robert E. Lee's that will appeal principally to Civil War buffs. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1995

"Savvy, often sardonic briefings on the consequential role of subterfuge in an enterprise in which, as the old saw has it, truth is the first casualty. (maps, charts, tables)"
A whole-earth catalogue of martial cunning that suggests Victorian novelist Francis E. Smedley was at least half right when he decreed that ``all's fair in love and war.'' In a breezy survey more notable for breadth than depth, Dunnigan and Nofi (Shooting Blanks, 1991) offer a series of short, self-contained takes that show why guile ranks among the most effective weapons in any arsenal. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1995

"Rigorous in its intellectual ponderings, stirring in its personal revelations."
An academic dares to veer from the formality of scholarly prose and talk frankly as a black woman about her experiences in the community, the university, and this nation. Read full book review >
AT HOME IN THE WORLD by Michael Jackson
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1995

"Jackson's ethnography stands on its own as an exploration of the main theme, but his poetry and his philosophizing are often arbitrary and a bit invasive."
A disconcerting blend of ethnography, poetry, and philosophy that attempts to answer the question of what it means to be at home in the world. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1995

"She was a rabid Welsh nationalist and Francophile, a combination rarely met outside a production of Henry V.'' The engaging recollections of a keen observer who looks back in ironic bemusement at horrific times he survived in remarkably good humor."
A well-born German Jew's immensely appealing reminiscences of his seven-year odyssey as a guest and then an officer of the British Crown. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"For the moment, Peck seems to have run out of road."
Severe inflammation of the ego is in evidence as ex-therapist Peck (Further Along the Road Less Traveled, 1993, etc.) muses on life and recounts his 21-day tour of Great Britain's ancient megalithic sites. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1995

"An almost too judicious reappraisal of a workhorse outfit, redeemed in large measure by the heartfelt tributes it pays to those who did the fighting and dying. (photos, maps)"
A diligent, workmanlike account of the frequently overlooked (or deprecated) contributions to the Allied cause made by the UK's Bomber Command during WW II. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1995

"A remarkable work, at once a rich analysis of Italian culture and politics, a real-life conspiracy-theory thriller, and a psychological portrait of two bona fide heroes."
A deep and devastating account of the assassination of Italy's top two anti-Mafia prosecutors. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >