History Book Reviews (page 918)

HISTORY
Released: May 24, 1994

A book by a white scholar claiming special insight into ``black realities'' promises to be either brave or presumptuous. Read full book review >
THE FORCE by David Dorsey
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 18, 1994

"Dorsey. (First serial to Esquire; Fortune Book Club selection)"
Freelance journalist Dorsey offers an unsparingly detailed account of a year-long span in the professional lives of a four- man/three-woman group of high-caste hucksters who work out of Xerox Corp.'s district office in Cleveland. Read full book review >

COLORED PEOPLE by Henry Louis Gates
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 18, 1994

"Gates left West Virginia for Yale and a meteoric career; the worlds he has seen since should someday make a terrific sequel."
One of the country's top black scholars offers a tender memoir of his youth in a West Virginia paper mill town in the 1950s and '60s. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 18, 1994

"Although passable as postcard travel writing, Seeing Vietnam is more hopeful traveling than arrival at an understanding of a country's painful history and problematic future. ($25,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Equal amounts of cram-course pedagogy and '60s reminiscences pepper this Vietnam travelogue by feminist journalist and novelist Brownmiller (Waverly Place, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 1994

"Yet, despite past victories, he is only too aware of the continuing, desperate plight of the African-American underclass."
Greenberg (Race Relations in American History, not reviewed), former head of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, recounts the revolutionary and riveting saga of the fight for civil rights in the 1950s and '60s. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 16, 1994

"A highly detailed, encompassing account that is both clear and complex, honoring the intricacies and complexity of America's deepest problem."
A philosophical and factual history of race relations in this country. Read full book review >
MAD PRINCES OF RENAISSANCE GERMANY by H.C. Erik Midelfort
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 16, 1994

"Even so, more academic than popular."
A history of insanity among German royals from about 1450 to 1630, by the author of Witch Hunting in Southwestern Germany, 1562-1684 (not reviewed). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 16, 1994

"This is fun to read as the names drop, but it offers more titillation than insight into a woman who rode out from a proper Dorset upbringing to adventure, wealth, power—and acknowledged achievement."
If the current US ambassador to France, Pamela Harriman, had spent as much time on her back as this book suggests, she would never have had the time to do the world-class housekeeping and flower arrangements that allegedly endeared her to her lovers—let alone become an authority on antiques, bring together historic personalities for global policy discussions, or raise millions of dollars for the Democratic party. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 15, 1994

"The sense of immediacy in Beals's well-crafted account makes the events seem like they happened yesterday."
A profoundly uplifting—and also a profoundly depressing- -account of the integration of Central High in Little Rock, Arkansas, in 1957. Read full book review >
A TIME TO SPEAK by Helen Lewis
HISTORY
Released: May 15, 1994

"Lewis's intelligence shines throughout, made more luminous by her compassionate observations about the effects of war on human beings."
A compelling historical memoir by a Czech Jew who survived Auschwitz. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 12, 1994

"A worthwhile entry into current discussions of race relations, though it requires a dollop of skepticism."
A challenging, if not always thorough, reminder that middle- class blacks face accumulated experiences of racism too often ignored by the majority culture and scholars of race relations. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 12, 1994

"The book also has the virtue of being a de facto hands-on guide to walking in the Wienerwald, but one that will be primarily read as an anecdotal view of a largely vanished culture."
``A culture is not better than its woods,'' Auden once said. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >