History Book Reviews (page 918)

HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Accessible and paced with page-turning immediacy—an excellent overview of what happens when the avant-garde art world meets the conservative right. (Illustrations—25 b&w, two color—some seen.)"
Dubin (Sociology/SUNY at Purchase) offers an involving and evenhanded analysis of the ongoing confrontation between taboo- breaking artists and traditionalists bent on maintaining the status quo. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"A vivid retrospective, rich in tactical and strategic detail. (Eleven maps.)"
Another tour de force from military historian Hammel (Ambush Valley, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >

THE FOUNDERS OF AMERICA by Francis Jennings
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"A timely reminder of the importance of Indians in all periods of American history. (Eighty photographs; ten maps.)"
A latecomer in the outpouring of revisionist histories prompted by the Columbus celebration, this intensely idiosyncratic account reviews the centuries of conflict that led to the destruction of substantial Native American civilizations. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Powerful and moving—it's difficult to imagine a book that could say much more about Siberia, or say it better. (Sixteen pages of b&w illustrations, maps—not seen.)"
Well-written, vastly informative history of a largely unknown land, by Bobrick (Fearful Majesty, 1987). Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Oral history of a compellingly high order."
Haunting voices from a dark, disgraceful past, which afford a stunning and revelatory panorama of Japan's WW II experience. Read full book review >

A HISTORY OF THE MIND by Nicholas Humphrey
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Only then, perhaps, could one argue that Humphrey has developed a new theory of perception—not a touchy-feely one—to explain consciousness."
Actually, not a history of the mind, but a theory of consciousness—and an amazingly parsimonious theory at that. Read full book review >
CAULDRON OF TURMOIL by Barry Rubin
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"More a well-informed journalistic account of a recent crisis than a penetrating analysis."
From Middle East expert Rubin (Istanbul Intrigues, 1989, etc.): a policy history of the Gulf War, concentrating on the misconceptions and political climate that led to, and took place behind, the day-to-day events of the conflict. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"The sense you finally come away with is wistfulness: a good mind paddling manfully on, looking for an intellectual mainstream it never quite finds—and that may never have been there in the first place."
As a nonacademic poet and critic (for years he was a business executive), Gioia is rightfully appalled at the capture of poetry by the English departments of the land, and at how, in this enervating captivity, it has become trivialized, been made uniform, and lost all general readership. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"In any case, a moral call to arms, trumpeted with spirit."
A Catholic priest sets out to explain that the union of a free society and a free-market economy is not a shotgun wedding but a marriage made in heaven. Read full book review >
NOFZIGER by Lyn Nofziger
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"A partisan, mean-spirited, but sharply observed view of a fascinating political era."
Republican Party heavyweight Nofziger's political memoir details Ronald Reagan's rise from perceived joke to popular President, and Nofziger's role in that rise. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Neither dry chronology nor anecdotal diversion, but exemplary social history. (Numerous b&w illustrations.)"
Now embraced as a cultural treasure and called the most democratic space in New York, Central Park has a contentious and elitist history—expertly chronicled here by Rosenzweig (History/George Mason Univ.) and Blackmar (History/Columbia Univ.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Luis Alberto Urrea
April 21, 2015

Examining the borders between one nation and another, between one person and another, Luis Alberto Urrea’s latest story collection, The Water Museum, reveals his mastery of the short form. This collection includes the Edgar-award winning "Amapola" and his now-classic "Bid Farewell to Her Many Horses," which had the honor of being chosen for NPR's "Selected Shorts" not once but twice. Urrea has also recently published a poetry collection, Tijuana Book of the Dead, mixing lyricism and colloquial voices, mysticism and the daily grind. We talk to Urrea about both of his new books this week on Kirkus TV. View video >