History Book Reviews (page 918)

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 22, 1996

"While some of the results here are intriguing, most readers will no doubt prefer having the contents filtered by their favorite pundits. (16 line drawings) (Author tour)"
One of those books destined to be more talked about than read: Two political scientists offer an interesting take on negative advertising in election campaigns. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 22, 1996

"With a storyteller's flair that other scholars can only envy, Spence provides lucid context for a remarkable but unfamiliar chapter in Chinese and world history. (maps and illustrations, not seen) (Author tour)"
Absorbing perspectives on what drove the messianic leader of the Taiping uprising that convulsed China during the mid-19th century. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 19, 1996

"Although some descriptions and connections seem underdeveloped, on the whole Oxenhandler's account of himself and of his adopted culture forms a fine addition to its welcome new genre."
A charming and wise, if at times patchy, account of the importance of three French thinkers for postwar culture in general and for one American in particular. Read full book review >
UNION OF WORDS by Wayne Fields
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 18, 1996

"Excellent political, social, and intellectual history—and eloquently presented, as befits its subject."
An engrossing history of the American presidency and its practitioners, from Washington to Clinton, as told in their own words. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 18, 1996

Eleanor Roosevelt receives her due as a leading influence on recent American liberal thought. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 17, 1996

"General readers will find a wealth in Hamill's pages as well."
This exemplary collection of journalism is fueled by a powerful nostalgia for a New York—and a world—that once was. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 17, 1996

"An uneasy compound of coffee-table biography and college literary primer, this is an attractively produced but wholly optional supplement for Yeats devotees and Hibernophiles. (150 b&w photos and 36 colorplates)"
Pierce's distant, skeptical, pedantic view of Yeats's life and poetry seems all the weaker next to the lavish illustrations that accompany the text. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 16, 1996

"While the dominant street slang adds authenticity, the book may prove to be largely inaccessible to the very people who most need to read it."
A candid, often vexing collection of interviews with young black men on key contemporary issues. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 15, 1996

"A British backbencher would be amused by the suggestion that parliamentary government is efficient and democratic, as would an American by the author's asserting the moral authority of the House of Representatives. (Author tour)"
With breathtaking oversimplification, Lazare, New York editor of In These Times, reduces America's problems to the inefficiencies wrought by its Constitution. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 15, 1996

"Although perhaps of more interest to students of sociology than to the general reader, Moore's study warmly tells a success story about a little-known aspect of WW II."
In an original contribution to the extensive WW II literature, Moore (Sociology/SUNY, Buffalo) has compiled oral histories of African-American women who served in the Women's Army Corps (WAC) 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 15, 1996

"An outstanding, urgent book."
Powerful reflections on the condition of a group that many are coming to regard as an endangered species: the African-American male. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 13, 1996

"Like a large gray overcoat—necessary, useful, and uninspiring. (Author tour)"
An informative but dully written book on one of the thorns in female society's side: divisiveness on the basis of race between women who otherwise would gain tremendously from an alliance. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >