History Book Reviews (page 918)

NON-FICTION
Released: July 12, 1995

"Its thesis is a paper tiger, and it relies exclusively on well-known published sources."
A derivative and unfocused account of ``the problems posed by Judeo-German culture as a whole'' from the Enlightenment to German reunification. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 11, 1995

"What the reader takes away is not a comprehension of killing, but rather an understanding of redemption and the ability to either conjure up hope or live without it. (Author tour)"
What do murderers want to talk about? Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: July 10, 1995

"A fine book by a historian who has mastered his sources and interweaves his themes with a sure sense of their significance and drama. (16 pages b&w photos, 3 maps) (Book-of-the-Month Club alternate selection)"
Engrossing and skillful account of the Second World War's final month. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 10, 1995

"An informal and impressionistic account of some Civil War incidents as seen from the ranks; ghostly memories from a man of character."
An absorbing memoir of the battles of Seven Days, Second Manassas, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, and Chickamauga. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 10, 1995

"A compelling blend of memoir and literary analysis; too bad her understanding of feminism is a little out of date."
Despite the insipid title, an evocative exploration of the author's struggle to see her own physical beauty, skillfully blended with rigorous and sensitive analyses of literary heroines who have tried to do the same. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: July 7, 1995

"A noteworthy contribution. (30 b&w photos, not seen)"
A clear-eyed, provocative history of an often neglected area of Native American and Civil War studies. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 7, 1995

"Comprehensive, clearly organized, and low-keyjust the kind of thoughtful, undogmatic approach this material needs."
A well-researched look at black Americans and religion, dispelling the notion that the slaves accepted their masters' beliefs without question. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 6, 1995

"Informative, but a little more human interest would have given color to all those historical and social generalizations."
A history of New York City as varied as the metropolis itself, focusing on the immigrants who throughout the centuries have harkened to America's call and remade New York in their own image. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 4, 1995

"Still, an intelligent albeit unfocused foray, far richer—and much worthier of serious consideration—than the usual polemic."
Neoconservative gadfly Lind bites fiercely at right and left- -and just about every American institution in between. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 3, 1995

"The engrossing text has helpful tabular material and graphics throughout."
Taking issue with intellectual Francis Fukayama, who posits the end of history, business strategist Ohmae (The Borderless World, 1990) more plausibly prophesies the eventual demise of the nation-state, because it has become ``an unnatural, even dysfunctional, unit in terms of which to think about or organize economic activity.'' Writing with his customary brio and clarity, the Tokyo-based, MIT-educated consultant makes a persuasive case for the arresting proposition that sovereignty is increasingly irrelevant. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1995

"The authors' masterful marshalling of the evidence prompts relief that the invasion of Japan never took place, but it's unlikely to put to rest historical speculation about the morality of Truman's decision. (photos, not seen)"
This grim and painstaking analysis of plans for operations Olympic and Coronet (the invasions of Kyushu and Honshu) argues that dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki was a military necessity that hastened the end of WW II and saved possibly millions of Japanese and American lives. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1995

"Despite occasional flashes of jingoism, Bolger emerges as a military thinker of rugged intelligence, and his conclusion—that the rules of war are changing rapidly and American military doctrine must change accordingly—appears accurate. (32 b&w photos, 12 maps, 20 diagrams, not seen)"
An insightful investigation of ``Operations Other Than War'' (OOTW)—military jargon for the plethora of unconventional warlike operations in which the US has engaged in recent years. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >