History Book Reviews (page 919)

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"At its heart, and where it succeeds, the tragic story of a talented, vivacious young girl who desperately wanted to be a normal American teenager. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
The human drama overshadows the political intrigue in this uneven account of a Palestinian who murdered his daughter. Read full book review >
THOMAS MANN by Ronald Hayman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"An important, accomplished work, containing the outlines of a less professional, more passionate look at Mann and his family that, while yet unwritten, might someday provide drama to match the master's. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Veteran biographer Hayman (Tennessee Williams, 1994, etc.) painstakingly traces the great German novelist's progress from anatomist of fin-de-siäcle decadence to august personification of his nation's conscience. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

An intriguing record of the contested, anxious decisions behind every brick of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Still, despite its limitations, for general readers Morgan's volume serves just fine. (maps, b&w illustrations, not seen)"
Stuffing a massive subject—in this case, the Anglo-American conquest of North America over the last two centuries—between the covers of a single volume is like teaching a cat to heel: It's a neat trick, but necessarily one of limited utility. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Virtually no appeal to the general reader, but essential reading to anthropologists caught up in the general theoretical upheaval affecting the discipline."
Round two in an academic fistfight concerning interpretations of the Hawaiian perception of Captain Cook (172879). Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"While Yeti enthusiasts may be disappointed, Taylor-Ide has been where few have tread and emerges with a fascinating portrait. (b&w photos)"
Dispatches from the Yeti watch, with entertaining rambles into the deep, near-mythic valleys of Nepal. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"One senses from the volume that Tower shares Taylor's esteem for Lee, and it proves that indeed one can be a hero to one's valet after all."
An interesting collection of letters by a personal confidant of Robert E. Lee's that will appeal principally to Civil War buffs. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Savvy, often sardonic briefings on the consequential role of subterfuge in an enterprise in which, as the old saw has it, truth is the first casualty. (maps, charts, tables)"
A whole-earth catalogue of martial cunning that suggests Victorian novelist Francis E. Smedley was at least half right when he decreed that ``all's fair in love and war.'' In a breezy survey more notable for breadth than depth, Dunnigan and Nofi (Shooting Blanks, 1991) offer a series of short, self-contained takes that show why guile ranks among the most effective weapons in any arsenal. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Rigorous in its intellectual ponderings, stirring in its personal revelations."
An academic dares to veer from the formality of scholarly prose and talk frankly as a black woman about her experiences in the community, the university, and this nation. Read full book review >
AT HOME IN THE WORLD by Michael Jackson
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Jackson's ethnography stands on its own as an exploration of the main theme, but his poetry and his philosophizing are often arbitrary and a bit invasive."
A disconcerting blend of ethnography, poetry, and philosophy that attempts to answer the question of what it means to be at home in the world. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"She was a rabid Welsh nationalist and Francophile, a combination rarely met outside a production of Henry V.'' The engaging recollections of a keen observer who looks back in ironic bemusement at horrific times he survived in remarkably good humor."
A well-born German Jew's immensely appealing reminiscences of his seven-year odyssey as a guest and then an officer of the British Crown. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"For the moment, Peck seems to have run out of road."
Severe inflammation of the ego is in evidence as ex-therapist Peck (Further Along the Road Less Traveled, 1993, etc.) muses on life and recounts his 21-day tour of Great Britain's ancient megalithic sites. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >