History Book Reviews (page 919)

ARTHUR C. CLARKE by Neil McAleer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Useful to specialists and students of sf, but likely to disappoint the more general reader. (Thirty b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Science journalist McAleer (The Mind-Boggling Universe, 1987; The Body Almanac, 1985) turns his attention to one of the giants of his own field. Read full book review >
DEAN ACHESON by Douglas Brinkley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Even Acheson, for all his crustiness, would have respected the clear, concise writing and objectivity of this fine political biography. (Twenty illustrations—not seen.)"
Cool, lucid account of the later years of a towering cold-war figure; by Brinkley (History/Hofstra Univ.). Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Though claiming an alarming trend toward medical coverups in the White House during the past century, Ferrell provides extensive data on only Eisenhower's case; if a pattern exists, he doesn't conclusively demonstrate it."
Medical coverups—and goof-ups—in the White House since Grover Cleveland's day, by the author/editor of numerous books on U.S. Presidents (Truman, 1984, etc.). Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Moving, inspiring at best; mildly informative but too often sketchy."
Essays by the activist poet (Civil Wars, 1981, etc.) that offer moments of insight or interpretation but are best for fellow progressives. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"A strong antidote to ethnic scapegoating and quick-fix thinking about trade imbalances."
Expert analysis of evolving US/Asia economic and cultural realities, by Gibney (Asian Editor of the Encyclopaedia Britannica; Miracle by Design, 1982, etc.). Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Strong on O'Brien but weak on Burke—and most readers will have to resort to a handbook on the religious and political controversies of the 18th century, as well to as a conventional Burke biography, to make sense of it all. (Illustrations—not seen.)"
O'Brien (Pro-Chancellor/Univ. of Dublin; Cunning and Passion, 1988, etc.) argues here that Edmund Burke (1729-97), widely considered the ``father of modern conservatism,'' was really a ``liberal pluralist.'' Neither biography (not even an ``unconventional'' one, as O'Brien claims) nor anthology (too little Burke, too much O'Brien), this is an extended political essay focusing on four arenas of 18th-century political life—Ireland, America, India, and France- -preceded by an attack on the dominant school of Burke scholarship, which, in assessing Burke as a conservative, consigned him, O'Brien says, to ``the ash-bin of history.'' O'Brien believes that he can provide the ``basis and essentials for a Burke revival'' by proving that Burke was, in fact, a prophet of revolution. Read full book review >
THE IMMOBILE EMPIRE by Alain Peyrefitte
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"But while Peyrefitte's nearly day-by-day account will fascinate Sinologists and students of East-West affairs, it may prove too detailed for the average reader. (Sixteen pages of full-color illustrations and six maps—not seen.)"
A painstakingly researched, gracefully written, but far too leisurely account of the misadventures of an 18th-century British royal delegation to the Celestial Court of the Chinese Emperor Qianlong. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Lack of historical perspective and of a serious overarching view of the international intelligence community doom this cheery bureaucratic tale to mediocrity. (Eight-page photo insert—not seen.)"
Authorized history of the CIA, by Kessler (Escape from the CIA, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"An authoritative briefing whose band-of-brothers perspectives make it a genuinely affecting addition to the growing record of America's involvement in Vietnam. (Sixteen pages of photographs— not seen—and seven maps.)"
During mid-November 1965, Moore (then a lieutenant colonel) led 450 officers and men from the US Army's 1st Cavalry Division into the Ia Drang Valley, a trackless waste near Vietnam's border with Cambodia that served as a Communist sanctuary and infiltration route into Vietnam's Central Highlands. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"A Blue Highways on horseback, well worth the trip. (Maps.)"
A torturous and sometimes comical attempt to trace Coronado's 450-year-old footsteps through the deserts and mountains of the American Southwest. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Everywhere here, one is in the presence of a superior sensibility, all the more remarkable for its modest beginnings."
Ten years after his first book, Hunger of Memory, Rodriguez again threatens to redefine the way we think about ethnicity, education, and religion in present-day America. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Has the feel of a magazine article padded out with term-paper material into a book."
How prejudices based on skin color (as well as hair texture and facial structure) affect the daily lives and life opportunities of blacks in their dealings with whites and—above all—with each other: A compilation of anecdotes with a familiar historical overview and mostly obvious conclusions. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >