History Book Reviews (page 919)

HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1995

"Provocative reading, whatever your point of view."
American pragmatism and delight in clashing values characterize this well-informed survey of contemporary moral issues. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"Hardly unbiased, but an important close-quarters view of a complex president and human being. (b&w illustrations, not seen)"
FDR's life was like a multi-sided house whose shape could not be discerned in one glimpse. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1995

"A good idea, executed in a manner that will reinforce the widely held opinion that history is boring."
A historian celebrates America's democratic past with an overview of fundamental changes in American culture. Read full book review >
JEWISH STATE OR ISRAELI NATION? by Boas Evron
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1995

"A pseudo-intellectual drive-by with a misfiring Uzi."
A jaded, outdated manifesto of post-Zionism by an Israeli journalist. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1995

"Fairclough has documented an American success story in this valuable contribution to the literature of the civil rights movement."
A richly detailed, scholarly examination of the rise of the civil rights movement in Louisiana. Read full book review >

ART SINCE 1940 by Jonathan Fineberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"Immediately appealing as a textbook, lively enough to attract general readers as well. (557 illustrations, including 212 color plates)"
An ambitious and glossy survey of contemporary Western art, packed with no-nonsense analysis and biographical detail on myriad artists. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1995

"In this thoughtful social history, Payne gives due regard to those activists great and small. (27 b&w photographs, map, not seen)"
With this history of the civil rights movement focusing on the Everyman turned hero, the commoner as crusader for justice, Payne challenges the old idea that history is the biography of great men. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"One can't help but wish that Powers had decided what book she really wanted to write—her political autobiography or her schoolgirlish romantic diary. (photos, not seen) (First printing of 30,000; author tour)"
As one of the few women to hold a leadership position in the civil rights movement, Powers has a compelling story, but it is far overshadowed by her kiss-and-tell tales about her affair with Martin Luther King Jr. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1995

"By going to the very core of our beliefs about life, Singer has created just about as controversial a book as possible."
The doctrine of the sanctity of human life is in deep trouble, claims Australian philospher Singer (The Expanding Circle: Ethics and Sociobiology, 1981, etc.), who gives his own clear ideas of what should replace it in this decidedly provocative work. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 31, 1995

"Useful mainly to journalists and history buffs. (First serial to Civilization)"
Though disconnected, an interesting defense of the 1950s work of columnists Joe and Stewart Alsop. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 20, 1995

"This one is for the haters—those who hate Clinton, and those who hate journalism. (40 photos)"
This book-length supermarket tabloid version of the lives of Bill and Hillary Clinton is a vicious hatchet job of the first order. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 20, 1995

"Those most likely to benefit from this excursion in self-help might be those who recognize it as raw material for satire."
The road less traveled has by now become the beaten path, and Schwartz—reporting a recent and exhaustive spiritual trek—doesn't leave discernible footprints on it. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >