History Book Reviews (page 919)

BLOND GHOST by David Corn
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"A fairly absorbing read about the CIA, though the special significance of its protagonist isn't really established."
Nation Washington editor Corn delves thoroughly and with gusto into the career of Ted Shackley, one of the more shadowy CIA agents of the Cold War period. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"As studies of the Civil War become more narrow in focus, it's refreshing to find a volume that has some sweep to it, using the war in and around Kentucky to encapsulate the entire conflict in the West."
A well-written, well-argued story of the Civil War in the West. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Despite his lefty, multi-culty inclinations, Gonick maintains the high level of sophistication, skepticism, and just plain fun established by the first volume."
Imagine a collaboration between Arnold Toynbee and R. Crumb and you get a pretty good idea of Gonick's clever and ambitious comic book series. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Scholars in religious studies, seasoned scroll amateurs, and newcomers to this fascinating subject can all benefit from immersion in this welcome volume. (40 photos) (Author tour)"
The most thorough and authoritative of the flood of new books occasioned by the full release of the Dead Sea Scrolls between 1991 and 1993. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"While victory and spoils historically go hand in hand, our perception of American Army heroes bringing goodwill and safety in the Nazis' wake is altered by this testament to the dishonesty and greed of a few no-good men."
Alford's fascinating unraveling of an Army cover-up reveals many American WW II soldiers to be not the great liberators, but the great looters of Europe. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"The religious right and true believers in Reaganomics, however, will cheer Evans on every step of the way."
Discussion of the role of religion in the formation of the Republic becomes a soapbox for right-wing reimagining of American history by the chairman of the National Journalism Center. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"A rich, sympathetic, warts-and-all portrait of the South."
In a perceptive look at the nation's most distinctive region, Grantham (History/Vanderbilt Univ.) examines the relationship between the South and the rest of the United States during the 20th century. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Perceptive, methodical, and dull. (28 photos & 2 maps, not seen)"
Plodding narrative and slack writing plague this account of the fierce 1870s events that set the stage for the legends surrounding Billy the Kid. Read full book review >
THE WHITE HOUSE IN MINIATURE by Gail Buckland
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"And how come there aren't any toilets?"
No doubt about it—this book, which presents (with infinite care) the miniature White House constructed by John and Jan Zweifel (with more than infinite care), is astonishing. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 29, 1994

"No mere coffee-table ornament, but a historical document of great drama and unusual intensity."
A spectacular, startling, and sometimes downright grisly chronicle, in words and pictures, of a bloody and tumultuous period. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 28, 1994

"But even after undergoing therapy, Gaines still hasn't finished blaming others for things she did to herself. (Author tour)"
An autobiographical portrait of a black woman who worked her way up from convicted felon to award-winning reporter for the Washington Post. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 27, 1994

"Zinn's radical activism will not appeal to every reader, but he does argue persuasively — and relevantly, even for those who do not embrace his critique of America and its institutions — that 'small acts, when multiplied by millions of people, can transform the world.'"
The eminent radical historian (Boston Univ.; Declarations of Independence, 1990, etc.) recalls his struggles against American racism and war, and he expresses his hope for the future, in this memoir and manifesto. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >