History Book Reviews (page 919)

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Still, he indicates important avenues for study, and frames an intelligent approach for addressing the social and economic trauma of black America."
Here, Billingsley (Sociology/Univ. of Maryland; Black Families in White America—not reviewed) challenges the worth of studies of dysfunctional black families. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

An erstwhile alarmist's reassessment of the socioeconomic threat posed by Japan in the wake of its recent success. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"As compelling and revelatory an account of the Gulf War as has yet been published."
A journalist's haunting, beautifully written record of the eventful time he spent in the Middle East before, during, and after the Gulf War. Read full book review >
NO MORE NICE GIRLS by Ellen Willis
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Despite the rhetorical excesses and some padding (two throwaway pieces about Picasso and Warhol): a must-browse for readers interested in feminism and the culture wars."
The former Village Voice writer and editor (Journalism/NYU) collects almost 30 essays and book reviews spanning the 80's. Read full book review >
199 DAYS by Edwin P. Hoyt
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Military history of a very high caliber. (Maps, plus 32 pages of fresh photos from the erstwhile USSR—some seen.)"
An illuminating overview of the murderously destructive clash that, arguably, paved the way for Germany's defeat in WW II. Read full book review >

YEAR 501 by Noam Chomsky
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"White-knuckle analysis by one who shares Orwell's 'power of facing unpleasant facts.'"
The sun hasn't set on imperialism, according to famed linguist and radical thinker Chomsky (The Chomsky Reader, 1987, etc.) in this forceful analysis of global economics. Read full book review >
THE APPRENTICE WRITER by Julian Green
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 30, 1993

"Elegant evocations of a golden age when writers wrote—and lived well—in Paris, which truly was the city of light."
From nonagenarian expatriate Green (The Green Paradise, p. 1233, etc.): a collection comprised of essays, lecture notes, and a short story written in 1920, when the author was a student at the University of Virginia. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 28, 1993

"An often heartrending portrait of a family and a life shattered by state paranoia, and of a world turned upside-down. (First printing of 25,000)"
A nightmarish tale of political persecution in Communist China. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 25, 1993

"An engaging study, shedding relevant historical light on today's multiethnic America."
Thoughtful, low-key survey of WW II Hawaii—the ``first strange place'' for almost a million US soldiers, sailors, and Marines. Read full book review >
DREAM HOUSE by Charlotte Nekola
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 25, 1993

"In the world Nekola depicts—as opposed to the judgments she imposes on it—the struggle for men and women alike is one for simple survival, biological and emotional: an unheroic marathon in which adults perform the necessary tasks of domesticity."
However lyrically written, Nekola's memoir of a St. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 21, 1993

"A decent spanning-the-globe overview. (Photographs—not seen.)"
Radio-journalist Laufer (Iron Curtain Rising, 1991) visited Americans imprisoned in 21 countries for this readable if often superficial look at how travelers run afoul of the law abroad—and what happens when they do. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 20, 1993

"Imperative reading for all concerned with bias crimes and the temptation to fight arson with arson. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
The full story of the KKK's bombing of Jewish targets in the late 60's, and of the effective but illegal measures taken by the FBI to stop the violence. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Sabaa Tahir
August 4, 2015

Sabaa Tahir’s novel An Ember in the Ashes reveals a world inspired by ancient Rome and defined by brutality. Seventeen-year-old Laia has grown up with one rule for survival: Never challenge the Empire. But when Laia’s brother Darin is arrested for treason, she leaves behind everything she knows, risking her life to try and save him. She enlists help from the rebels whose extensive underground network may lead to Darin. Their help comes with a price, though. Laia must infiltrate the Empire’s greatest military academy as a spy. Elias is the Empire’s finest soldier—and its most unwilling one. Thrown together by chance and united by their hatred of the Empire, Laia and Elias will soon discover that their fates are intertwined—and that their choices may change the destiny of the entire Empire. We talk to An Ember in the Ashes author Sabaa Tahir this week on Kirkus TV. View video >