History Book Reviews (page 920)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1994

"A fascinating glimpse inside the sometimes arcane and always political workings of the US Supreme Court and one of its influential members."
An exhaustive and informative biography of a previously neglected Supreme Court justice, written by one his former clerks. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1994

"A notable achievement."
From a British specialist in Asian affairs, this is comprehensive, fact-choked history of the Engish East India Company, which went to India to trade and founded an empire—the British Raj. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1994

"She does this entertainingly and with a minimum of dry analysis."
Levathes, a former staff writer for National Geographic, tells the tale of Chinese emperor Zhu Di and his favorite eunuch admiral, Zheng He, who tried during a 30-year period to break China's isolation with seven major naval expeditions to India, Indonesia, and Africa. Read full book review >
NUREMBERG by Joseph Persico
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1994

"Persico writes well, despite occasionally drifting into melodrama, and the subject exerts its own fascination."
Most books about the Nuremberg trials have focused on the jurisprudential aspects of this unprecedented event. Read full book review >
LINCOLN IN AMERICAN MEMORY by Merrill D. Peterson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1994

"On the other hand, thinking readers will find it refreshing to reach their own judgments of the Lincoln treatments chronicled in a mostly fine piece of historiography."
Peterson (History/Univ. of Virginia; The Jefferson Image in the American Mind, not reviewed) uses the life and legend of Abraham Lincoln to show the general reader how ``history'' is made. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 1994

"A good read that sheds light not just on US ties with a particular country, but on the personal and even idiosyncratic ways in which US foreign policy is sometimes made."
CBS correspondent Dan Raviv and Israeli journalist Yossi Melman (Every Spy a Prince, 1990) explore the special but often troubled relationship between Israel and the US. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1994

"Much better at deconstruction than solutions, but an accessible catalogue for those questioning the new status quo."
A progressive journalist offers a tonic, conversational critique of the Clinton era. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1994

"The bottom line: a linear take on an oldish rogues-to-riches tale, conspicuously deficient in the resonance that could have made it worth retelling."
A lackluster retelling of a celebrated stock-rigging case and its aftershocks, which rippled through Los Angeles for the better (or worse) part of a decade, from the author of Baseball's Great Experiment (1983). Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1994

"High marks for being both instructive and entertaining."
A demanding but rewarding report that illuminates what neurology can now tell us about the human brain. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1994

"A novel contribution to the massive corpus of literature on American slavery—one that shows slaves as skilled artisans leading lives of considerable dignity and achievement, who despite their accomplishments under the slave regime never stopped yearning for freedom."
Dew (American Studies/Williams) uses the meticulously kept records of Virginia slaveholders to create an engrossing, often surprising record of everyday life on an estate in the antebellum South. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 1994

"His book will appeal—and offer new ideas—to conservatives and liberals alike."
A savvy look at how the feelings aroused by TV contribute to our political alienation. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1994

"Inspiring and informative, this book fills large gaps in what we know about resistance in the concentration camps."
The first significant study of concentration camp resistance to focus on the political dynamics of inmates of varying nationalities and classifications. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >