History Book Reviews (page 920)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 20, 1993

"The text has helpful tabular material throughout."
Just when you thought the world might become a kinder, gentler, even safer place, a veteran military analyst appears with an arresting reminder that, notwithstanding the cold war's end, our planet still encompasses a full measure of potential hot spots. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 20, 1993

"Telling details, crisp writing, good history. (Twenty-four b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Quality muckraking by journalist Mitchell (CNN, Parade Magazine, etc.), now a special assistant with the FDA. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 18, 1993

"An affectionate foreword by Jonas Salk is included. (Eight-page photo insert.)"
Undoubtedly the most eccentric of the group of unusual scientists involved in the Manhattan Project, Szilard (1898-1964) led a life sufficiently extraordinary to survive this conscientious, sometimes plodding treatment by a senior energy- policy analyst, aided by Szilard's younger brother. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 13, 1993

"Dry and overly general, but Cole picks up steam and passion as she goes along, and ends effectively with questions and suggestions aimed at encouraging the sister-reader to use her own mind to address issues raised and to explore her consciousness and her life."
Old-fashioned uplift with contemporary focus on race, gender, and class from the first female president of Spelman, the prestigious, historically black college for women. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 13, 1993

"Too long by far, but an engrossing, multilayered portrait—as well as a touching personal odyssey. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Magisterial investigation of black America by a white reporter for The Washington Post; portions have appeared in Life magazine and the Washington Post Sunday Magazine. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 12, 1993

"A definitive portrait of a symbol of the American Century—a figure touchingly innocent yet dangerously arrogant in his belief that all events could be controlled by can-do optimism and technological superiority. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
A sweeping, formidably researched life of Robert McNamara, the gifted, conflicted figure who for 30 years transformed American institutions as president of Ford Motor Co., head of the World Bank, and, most fatefully, secretary of defense under JFK and LBJ. Read full book review >
THE PASSION OF MICHEL FOUCAULT by James Miller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 11, 1993

"A riveting portrait marred only by occasional lapses into redundancy, and likely to spur even greater interest—both within and outside the university—in the writings of this influential, enigmatic man."
Revelatory, well-written account of the controversial life and writings of French historian and philosopher Foucault. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 11, 1993

"A dramatic story told with engaging verve, becoming modesty, and beguiling wit by an astute practitioner of statecraft. (Photographs—not seen.)"
A former assistant secretary of state's riveting memoir—as much a primer on diplomacy as an eyewitness account—of his eight- year-long effort to bring peace to southern Africa. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 11, 1993

"He presents some valuable policy suggestions toward book's end, but, most of the way, he seems asleep at the wheel."
The former foreign-service officer, professor at Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study, and author of 18 books now offers The World According to Kennan. Read full book review >
GIAP by Peter MacDonald
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 11, 1993

"As authoritative an account of Giap and his considerable achievements as is likely to be available any time soon. (Photographs and maps—not seen.)"
A perceptive briefing on the remarkable career of Vo Nguyen Giap, Vietnam's ranking soldier-statesman and, arguably, one of military history's greatest captains; by a British brigadier who gained direct access to his subject. Read full book review >
MY FATHER'S SON by Farley Mowat
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 11, 1993

"Not a classic—Mowat's talent hadn't yet matured, and Angus wasn't of Farley's stature as a writer—but a bracing reminder of what really matters. (Photographs—not seen.)"
A one-of-a-kind book, and with a misleading authorship—for this is actually a collection of correspondence between Mowat, one of Canada's most popular and cantakerous writers, and his novelist-librarian father during the harrowing WW II years of 1942-45. Read full book review >
LORD BEAVERBROOK by Anne Chisholm
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 8, 1993

"These cavils apart: a comprehensive rundown on one of the fourth estate's more consequential figures. (Thirty-two pages of photographs—not seen.)"
An engrossing, if tediously detailed, biography of William Maxwell Aitken (lst Baron Beaverbrook), the Canadian adventurer who gained fame as a British press-lord, politico, and socialite. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Sabaa Tahir
August 4, 2015

Sabaa Tahir’s novel An Ember in the Ashes reveals a world inspired by ancient Rome and defined by brutality. Seventeen-year-old Laia has grown up with one rule for survival: Never challenge the Empire. But when Laia’s brother Darin is arrested for treason, she leaves behind everything she knows, risking her life to try and save him. She enlists help from the rebels whose extensive underground network may lead to Darin. Their help comes with a price, though. Laia must infiltrate the Empire’s greatest military academy as a spy. Elias is the Empire’s finest soldier—and its most unwilling one. Thrown together by chance and united by their hatred of the Empire, Laia and Elias will soon discover that their fates are intertwined—and that their choices may change the destiny of the entire Empire. We talk to An Ember in the Ashes author Sabaa Tahir this week on Kirkus TV. View video >