History Book Reviews (page 920)

HISTORY
Released: March 20, 1995

"Those most likely to benefit from this excursion in self-help might be those who recognize it as raw material for satire."
The road less traveled has by now become the beaten path, and Schwartz—reporting a recent and exhaustive spiritual trek—doesn't leave discernible footprints on it. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 17, 1995

"A creative, refreshingly unorthodox examination of American morality."
A broad yet thematically cogent collection of essays, previously published in Harper's and elsewhere, about critical cultural issues and their underlying moral considerations. Read full book review >

THE FALL OF NAPOLEON by David Hamilton-Williams
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 1995

"The illustrations, however, are outstanding."
A well-researched and original, if somewhat overwrought, history of Napoleon's fall from power, from his return from Moscow to his death in 1821 on the island of St. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 15, 1995

"Superb social history."
Gathering together seven lectures by distinguished academic historians, Hufton (History/Oxford Univ.) introduces a much-needed historical perspective into the contemporary discussion on human rights. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 14, 1995

"Blocksma contributes mightily to our understanding of a vital section of the continent."
A definitive guide and then some to what seems to be every mile of the more than 5,000 traveled by Blocksma (Naming Nature, not reviewed) along the US side of the Great Lakes. Read full book review >

THE X FACTOR by George Plimpton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 13, 1995

"Win or lose, Plimpton writes with self-effacing humor and at least as much wit as wisdom; America's most famous professional dilettante doesn't demand to be taken too seriously."
The adroit author (Open Net, 1987, etc.), Paris Review editor, and amateur jock who plays with the pros suits up once again to pitch horseshoes with George Bush and, incidentally, to pursue the elusive factor that makes champions out of mortals. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 13, 1995

"American values,'' makes this good book especially timely."
Tailgunner Joe rises from the grave in this nightmarish, spellbinding excursion into our nation's recent past. Read full book review >
FIRST IN HIS CLASS by David Maraniss
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 6, 1995

Neither hagiography nor hatchet job, this illuminating, unauthorized biography sticks to the facts to draw a sharp personal and political portrait of the man who became the first baby boomer to be elected President. Read full book review >
TOM PAINE by John Keane
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 6, 1995

"Nothing really new here (despite occasional sniping at minor errors by previous Paine biographers) but a solid, well-written portrait that reiterates Paine's ongoing importance in contemporary discussions of democracy's potential and perils."
An aptly subtitled biography of the trailblazing political polemicist: This detailed account finds virtually no trace of a personal life. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 3, 1995

"Otherwise, an invaluable introduction to this most necessary of journals."
This collection of essays and reviews from the New Criterion's last six years represents both the best and the worst that ideologically charged criticism has to offer. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 3, 1995

"The consistently absorbing text has 11 useful maps, an index, and a savvy discussion of sources."
A succinct account of America's wide-ranging involvement in WW II from a distinguished duo. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1995

"A troubling document on two levels: the damage done both to the people of Bosnia and to Western illusions of conscience and justice."
Rieff's powerful mix of reporting and polemic chronicles the fall of Bosnia and lambastes Western equivocation. ``Bosnia was and always will be a just cause....To have intervened on the side of Bosnia would have been self-defense, not charity,'' declares Rieff (The Exile, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >