History Book Reviews (page 923)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 21, 1994

"Chandler fits persuasive, albeit circumstantial, evidence into the puzzle of Lewis's death, situating it in the country's turbulent early era, but ultimately does not fill all the gaps and unknowns. (20 b&w photos, not seen)"
Chandler sets out to prove that the mysterious death in 1809 of explorer Meriwether Lewis was a murder and that the plot was masterminded by an ally of former president Thomas Jefferson and sanctioned by Jefferson himself. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 20, 1994

"An engrossing look behind one of the decade's most dramatic moments."
An objective, well-researched historical backdrop to the Israeli-Palestinian peace accord, by a Washington-based reporter. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: June 15, 1994

"Giles's book, at least, shows us how the turmoil related to the true achievement."
An authoritative and weighty history of France's Fourth Republic (1946-58) by the former Paris correspondent for the Times of London. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 14, 1994

"The Way to Xanadu is a testament to one woman's dauntless intellectual curiosity and an exquisitely crafted paean to a great poem and to the timeless march of human inquiry and imagination."
In this enchanting book, Alexander (One Dry Season, 1989) chronicles her journeys to the exotic places that inspired Coleridge's masterpiece ``Kubla Khan.'' In 1797 or 1798, in an opium-induced reverie, the poet wrote of Xanadu, with its ``walls and towers...girdled round,'' its ``caves of ice,'' its ``mighty fountain,'' and ``Mount Abora.'' Yet the poem's most arresting images are based not on actual visits made by Coleridge, but on written accounts of them penned by others—from Marco Polo to 18th-century American botanists. Read full book review >
THE COLD WAR by Martin Walker
HISTORY
Released: June 9, 1994

Absorbing history spanning five complex decades of geopolitics and economics with clarity and panache. Read full book review >

AMADOR by Fernando Savater
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 7, 1994

"De Magistro,'' of whose style Savater's will remind the reader."
A sometimes touching but ultimately banal discourse by a father to his son, offering advice on how to get along in life. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 6, 1994

"Epic, engrossing, big."
A one-volume edition of Hamilton's (JFK: Reckless Youth, 1992) three-volume biography, which won the Whitbread Award. Read full book review >
6/6/1944 by Gerald Astor
HISTORY
Released: June 6, 1994

"The consistently absorbing text has 24 pages of contemporary photographs. (First printing of 65,000)"
June 6, 1994, marks the 50th anniversary of D-day. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 6, 1994

"A brilliant account that blends perfectly the human and the strategic dimensions of this great battle."
A splendid, moving, and authoritative account of the most decisive day of WW II by Ambrose (History/Univ. of New Orleans), whose massive biographies of Eisenhower and Nixon have won widespread praise. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 6, 1994

"Riveting soldier's-eye views of the deadly confusion of battle, and a significant contribution to military and D-day literature."
Relying on correspondence, diaries, and interviews, Miller (The House of Getty, not reviewed) presents vivid first-person perspectives from British, German, and American combatants in the Allied invasion of Normandy. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 6, 1994

"Eloquent testimony for posterity, reminding us that military campaigns, however just, have awful costs."
While the 50th anniversary of D-day is being commemorated in many ways, few will be as affecting as the episodic journal of Marie Osmont, an aristocratic Frenchwoman who endured four comparatively pacific years of German occupation and three hellish months of liberation. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 6, 1994

"But his effort is worthy, and his conclusions contain much sense."
This broad-brush essay starts from the premise that ``there can be too much freedom in life, and that too much freedom has a serious moral, social, and emotional price.'' Schwartz (Psychology/Swarthmore) is concerned with the darker side of the seemingly limitless choices of middle-class American life. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >