History Book Reviews (page 923)

YEAR 501 by Noam Chomsky
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"White-knuckle analysis by one who shares Orwell's 'power of facing unpleasant facts.'"
The sun hasn't set on imperialism, according to famed linguist and radical thinker Chomsky (The Chomsky Reader, 1987, etc.) in this forceful analysis of global economics. Read full book review >
THE APPRENTICE WRITER by Julian Green
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 30, 1993

"Elegant evocations of a golden age when writers wrote—and lived well—in Paris, which truly was the city of light."
From nonagenarian expatriate Green (The Green Paradise, p. 1233, etc.): a collection comprised of essays, lecture notes, and a short story written in 1920, when the author was a student at the University of Virginia. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 28, 1993

"An often heartrending portrait of a family and a life shattered by state paranoia, and of a world turned upside-down. (First printing of 25,000)"
A nightmarish tale of political persecution in Communist China. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 25, 1993

"An engaging study, shedding relevant historical light on today's multiethnic America."
Thoughtful, low-key survey of WW II Hawaii—the ``first strange place'' for almost a million US soldiers, sailors, and Marines. Read full book review >
DREAM HOUSE by Charlotte Nekola
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 25, 1993

"In the world Nekola depicts—as opposed to the judgments she imposes on it—the struggle for men and women alike is one for simple survival, biological and emotional: an unheroic marathon in which adults perform the necessary tasks of domesticity."
However lyrically written, Nekola's memoir of a St. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 21, 1993

"A decent spanning-the-globe overview. (Photographs—not seen.)"
Radio-journalist Laufer (Iron Curtain Rising, 1991) visited Americans imprisoned in 21 countries for this readable if often superficial look at how travelers run afoul of the law abroad—and what happens when they do. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 20, 1993

"Imperative reading for all concerned with bias crimes and the temptation to fight arson with arson. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
The full story of the KKK's bombing of Jewish targets in the late 60's, and of the effective but illegal measures taken by the FBI to stop the violence. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 20, 1993

"The text has helpful tabular material throughout."
Just when you thought the world might become a kinder, gentler, even safer place, a veteran military analyst appears with an arresting reminder that, notwithstanding the cold war's end, our planet still encompasses a full measure of potential hot spots. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 20, 1993

"Telling details, crisp writing, good history. (Twenty-four b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Quality muckraking by journalist Mitchell (CNN, Parade Magazine, etc.), now a special assistant with the FDA. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 18, 1993

"An affectionate foreword by Jonas Salk is included. (Eight-page photo insert.)"
Undoubtedly the most eccentric of the group of unusual scientists involved in the Manhattan Project, Szilard (1898-1964) led a life sufficiently extraordinary to survive this conscientious, sometimes plodding treatment by a senior energy- policy analyst, aided by Szilard's younger brother. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 13, 1993

"Dry and overly general, but Cole picks up steam and passion as she goes along, and ends effectively with questions and suggestions aimed at encouraging the sister-reader to use her own mind to address issues raised and to explore her consciousness and her life."
Old-fashioned uplift with contemporary focus on race, gender, and class from the first female president of Spelman, the prestigious, historically black college for women. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 13, 1993

"Too long by far, but an engrossing, multilayered portrait—as well as a touching personal odyssey. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Magisterial investigation of black America by a white reporter for The Washington Post; portions have appeared in Life magazine and the Washington Post Sunday Magazine. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >