History Book Reviews (page 925)

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Poor Jacob Neusner, poor readerthis is dreary stuff from an admirably productive, often insightful scholar."
A curious hybrid: part history of the American university during the Cold War years, part memoir of the elder (Jacob) Neusner's five decades as perhaps America's leading Judaica scholar. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A solid contribution to the literature of recent American political history. (photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
A moving story of a poor family's unforeseen contribution to the civil-rights struggle in America. Read full book review >

LINCOLN by David Herbert Donald
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A magisterial work, destined to assume its place with those of Beveridge, Sandburg, Thomas, and Oates as a standard life of Lincoln. (Book-of-the-Month Club split main selection; History Book Club main selection)"
In a significant contribution to Lincoln scholarship, distinguished historian and Pulitzer Prizewinning biographer Donald (Harvard; Look Homeward: A Life of Thomas Wolfe, 1987, etc.) draws a richly detailed, absorbing portrait of our 16th president. Read full book review >
IN THIS DARK HOUSE by Louise Kehoe
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Author, heal thyself."
A somber and depressing account of a woman's incomplete escape from the most dysfunctional of families. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A sharp, but not totally effective, attack on one of the most powerful politicians in America today from a man who clearly doesn't want Robert Dole to become president."
An extremely unflattering portrait of Senator Robert Dole. Read full book review >

UNITED NATIONS by Stanley Meisler
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"But generally, a clear-eyed view of an organization as victimized by naive hope as by corrosive cynicism. (photos, not seen)"
An even-handed, realistic history that implicitly measures how far the UN has come in achieving the high hopes its founders held when it was created at the end of WW II. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Sure to spark intense debate among those concerned with the study of human sexuality."
A fresh and theoretically enticing approach to the study of human sexuality. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"An absorbing, exhaustive, valuable, scary book, slightly marred by disgust with the last people in America that it's okay to be disgusted withwhite trash."
Historian Carter (Emory Univ.; When the War Was Over, 1985, etc.) tackles racist demagogue George C. Wallace, four-time governor of Alabama and presidential candidate. Read full book review >
FOR A HANDFUL OF FEATHERS by Guy de la Valdéne
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Beautifully conceived and written, valuable for its insight into quail behavior and its thoughtful address of hunting ethics, a new classic for the sportsman's canon. (First serial to Sports Afield)"
Meditations on hunting, biodiversity, wildlife, ethics, and human folly unify a lifelong bird-hunter's quixotic venture to convert an 800-acre Florida farm into quail heaven. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

In a brilliant review of how American writers of the last two centuries have confronted evil by depicting it, Delbanco (Humanities/Columbia Univ.; The Puritan Ordeal, not reviewed) suggests that our postmodern inability to name evil puts us in danger of being dominated by it. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Nonetheless, a scholarly, entertaining, and astonishing look at the enormous distance humankind has traveled in a historical instant. (400 b&w photos and illustrations, not seen) (Book-of-the- Month Club alternate selection/History Book Club main selection)"
An erudite and breathtaking, if sometimes vexing, review of how our waning millennium might seem from the perspective of ``some galactic museum of the future.'' An American or European reader of the 1990s will be forgiven for thinking of this millennium as one of Western preeminence. Read full book review >
MAN OF THE PEOPLE by Alonzo L. Hamby
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A cool, highly nuanced examination of Truman's cultural and political milieus, but sadly lacking in the pace and narrative shape of McCullough's Pulitzer Prizewinning biography."
A game attempt by historian Hamby (Ohio Univ.) to replace the Oval Office bantamweight of political iconography with a more ambitious and self-doubting but able steward of the presidency. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >