History Book Reviews (page 925)

RAJIV GANDHI AND RAMA'S KINGDOM by Ved Mehta
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Mehta's innocent faith in market forces and progress make a complicated story meaningful but also perpetuate Western anxieties about the alien, unpredictable, and menacing character of modern India. (3 illustrations, not seen)"
Essays (most originally published in the New Yorker) providing a lucid account of the chaotic course of Indian politics since 1982. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"An important depiction of recent Chinese history too quickly being forgotten in the rush to seek trade with China."
This graphic account of the horrors of the Chinese Cultural Revolution will put to rest any remaining romantic notions about Chairman Mao. Read full book review >

MEMOIRS OF A WARSAW GHETTO FIGHTER by Simha Rotem
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"4 pages photos, not seen)."
The candid, fast-moving memoir of a significant member of the Warsaw Ghetto's fighting underground. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

There's a double entendre, likely intended, in the title. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Almost certainly the best book on this subject that we are likely to see."
This account of the Cambridge Spy Ring is so knowledgeable and full of insight that it sweeps the competition from the field. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A more lively tale of early Clintonism than some of the recent overviews."
A nifty case study of the tangled trail—from policy idea to law—of the bill that established the National and Community Service Trust Act of 1993, the program known as AmeriCorps. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"This falls considerably short of its potential as a major study of the tragic destruction of the Amazon and its indigenous people. (24 pages b&w photos, maps, not seen)"
Though chilling, this unfocused narrative fails to illuminate the purported relationship between Nelson Rockefeller, missionaries in South America, and the modern genocide of Amazonian Indians. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Howard says is needed to reform our regulatory system."
Attorney Howard makes an obvious but important point by decrying a system of governmental regulations whose complexity and detail often cause more harm than good; but his solutions are vague and quixotic. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Entertaining and sensitive."
How six resourceful women faced the perils of being married to King Henry VIII and managed to play an active role in the man's world of early 16th century England. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

The American ``occupation'' of Britain during WW II—the phrase is George Orwell's—could have been a disaster but, in the event, was almost a triumph. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Well written and well researched, a distinct contribution to the subject, even if land and legal records do not do justice to the agony of the times."
A good academic history of a small community in Ireland whose inhabitants died or migrated to the US during the famine of 1847- 48. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Minor problems, and a thick theoretical vocabulary aside, Chen's thesis is fundamentally sound, supportable, and intellectually challenging."
An ambitious revisionist challenge to Edward Said's concept of Orientalism. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >