History Book Reviews (page 928)

NON-FICTION
Released: April 23, 1996

"Students of the Information Age will find little new here, but Winograd and Buffa still offer useful points for debate."
When the machines of the information society take over, will the old political machine throw a rod? Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 22, 1996

"A dry and sometimes narrow work of history, meant for a specialist audience. (23 illustrations, not seen)"
Harvard historian Sullivan carefully details the impact of Roosevelt's later New Deal in the Old South, noting that any step forward often meant two steps back. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 22, 1996

"Many stories have been shared about casualties of the Cultural Revolution, but Sun-Childers's stands out for its unique childhood perspective and its probing treatment of the loss of innocence. (photos, not seen)"
The intelligent and affecting memoir of a young woman who grew up during the Chinese Cultural Revolution and managed to thrive despite its horrors. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 22, 1996

"While none of the ideas here are radically new, Williams presents his vision of a police department with enthusiasm and grace, and with the results to back it up."
A surprisingly compassionate, common-sense guide to controlling crime, from the police chief of Los Angeles. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 1996

"Perhaps he will try again with Clinton, from a perspective slightly broader than that of last week's news."
The title of this book by columnist Reeves (President Kennedy: Profile in Power, 1993) far exceeds its grasp. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 1996

"Jeffers is convincing in asserting that T.R. was highly instrumental both in bringing attention to the problem of foreign powers operating near our shores and along our Pacific frontier, and in strengthening American resolve and national defenses. (14 photos, not seen)"
A lively account of an important period in Theodore Roosevelt's career, when he first entered the national stage as a statesman, helped transform the US into a world power, and distinguished himself as a hero of the Spanish-American war. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 19, 1996

"A convincing brief for the argument that the extreme right poses a serious, ongoing danger in this country. ($50,000 ad/promo; author tour; radio satellite tour)"
Dees, chief trial counsel of the Southern Poverty Law Center, covers much of the same territory as Kenneth Stern (The Force Upon the Plain, 1995) in uncovering the danger of America's extreme right, but he does it with greater passion, considerable narrative drama, and deeply scary inside reports from SPLC moles. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 17, 1996

"Mexico watchers expect hard times to come for that country, and Oppenheimer's excellent book explains just why."
NAFTA, Zapatista guerrillas, and Wall Street form the backdrop for this fine journalistic account of Mexico's current tumult. Read full book review >
SISTER BROTHER by Brenda Wineapple
NON-FICTION
Released: April 16, 1996

"Thorough and intelligent, but lacking that final spark of empathy that distinguishes a truly exceptional biography. (b&w photos)"
Like Wineapple's Genàt: A Biography of Janet Flanner (1989), an impressively researched portrait of American expatriates—in this case, the writer Gertrude Stein (18741946) and her brother Leo (18721947), a pioneering modern art collector. Read full book review >
ELIZABETH by Sarah Bradford
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 16, 1996

"No tabloid hype here, but this authoritative biography has enough revealing nuggets scattered through an otherwise flat narrative to keep a royal watcher enthralled. (17 color and 39 b&w photos) (Author tour)"
In the year of her 70th birthday, Elizabeth II of England comes under scrutiny as mother (not quite good enough), wife (better), and constitutional monarch (outstanding). Read full book review >
BLAKE by Peter Ackroyd
NON-FICTION
Released: April 15, 1996

"Not the least part of Ackroyd's accomplishment is to have limited himself to 416 pages—enough, and (to paraphrase Blake), assuredly not too much. (16 pages b&w illustrations, 24 pages color illustrations, 73 text illustrations, not seen) (Book-of-the-Month Club selection)"
Ackroyd's biography of William Blake represents an achievement of composite method fully in the poet's own spirit—it's a work so sensitive to its subject, it seems to have conjured him from the beyond. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 15, 1996

"An informative primer with an attitude."
A laissez-faire economist's back-to-basics restatement of the case against Washington's active involvement in commercial affairs. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >