History Book Reviews (page 928)

SHERMAN by John F. Marszalek
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 30, 1992

"Despite his sometimes heavy-handed psychobiographical theme, Marszalek succeeds in making this gruff, complex warrior come alive."
An exhaustive but engaging biography that plumbs the personality of William Tecumseh Sherman—and attempts to explain the Civil War general's personal and military decisions as arising from a psychological need for order and control. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 30, 1992

"A thoroughly researched and well-told account of an important but often neglected Civil War encounter. (Eighteen maps.)"
Two history professors (Shea: Univ. of Arkansas at Monticello; Hess: Lincoln Memorial Univ.) offer an absorbing analysis of an important early conflict in the Civil War. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 23, 1992

"A vivid, exhaustive analysis—attuned to personalities as well as issues—of yet another national disgrace involving Native Americans. (Sixteen pages of photographs—not seen.)"
A detailed, scrupulously balanced assessment of the longstanding land dispute between the Hopi and the Navajo, which came to a head in the 1970's and 80's, when hundreds of Navajo families were forced to relocate. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 23, 1992

"Jackson's military career. (Sixteen pages of maps.)"
Alexander (Korea, 1986), in a significant and well-argued contribution to the already massive corpus of Robert E. Lee/Stonewall Jackson scholarship, asserts that ``Stonewall Jackson, not Lee, possessed the strategic vision necessary to win key battles''—and perhaps the Civil War. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 20, 1992

"But Reingold admires where Crichton bashes; as such, essential for all Japan-watchers. (Sixteen pages of photographs—not seen.)"
The former Tokyo Bureau chief of Time magazine, now a senior correspondent, on ``one of the most complex tales of modern twentieth-century history'': the astonishing rise and contradictory nature of postwar Japan. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 19, 1992

"Admirable passion, then, but screwy logic."
Scathing attack on American Jews by the former editor-in-chief of Globes, Israel's leading business newspaper. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 18, 1992

"A lively, like-it-is, full-dress-blue tribute to as unique a band of warriors as ever graced the pages of military history. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
A rousing tour of an elite assault force whose esprit and famed feats of arms retain considerable value in a high-tech era when US soldiery can engage in the moral equivalent of push-button warfare. Read full book review >
RUSSIA'S SECRET RULERS by Lev Timofeyev
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 18, 1992

"Not wholly persuasive, then—though Timofeyev's not alone in seeing Russia's criminal classes in the ascendant: This is also the premise, for instance, of Martin Cruz Smith's most recent novel, Red Square (p. 1085)."
An informative but confused look at the perpetuation in power of Russia's previous rulers, by one of the last dissidents to be jailed by the Gorbachev regime. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 18, 1992

"Given the current massive flux of US ethnic makeup, then: a timely work."
Thoughtful examination of ``ethnoracial'' influences on US foreign policy from colonial times onward; by DeConde (History/UC Santa Barbara; Town and Gown—ed., 1971, etc.). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 16, 1992

"A graceless, labor-of-love memoir. (Illustrations—not seen.)"
An amateurish genealogical exercise whose appeal for general readers is limited largely to a reverent profile of Asa G. Candler, Sr., the go-getting pharmacist who acquired rights to an unsung patent medicine known as Pemberton's Tonic and renamed it Coca- Cola. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 16, 1992

"Often too lenient on the Arab part in this deadly stalemate- -but a frequently convincing call for a new Middle East diplomacy, shorn of cold-war tensions and reconciling Israeli security with Palestinian desire for a homeland. (Maps & tables—not seen.)"
A sweeping indictment that claims that America's political, military, and economic ties to Israel have obstructed the path to peace and run counter to both countries' interests. Read full book review >
THE WIVES OF HENRY VIII by Antonia Fraser
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 16, 1992

Fraser (The Warrior Queens, 1989, etc.) brings her personable voice and vivid historical imagination to the six women who married Henry VIII. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >