History Book Reviews (page 928)

THE PRESIDENCY OF GERALD R. FORD by John Robert Greene
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 6, 1995

"A fair, balanced account of a troubled time and of a decent man whose efforts left the White House in better shape than he found it."
Gerald Ford comes across here as an average nice guy who was thrust into the hot seat of a banished president and who tried to heal a demoralized nation in the aftermath of Watergate and Vietnam. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 5, 1995

"Although Kagan restricts his study too much by examining only a small number of wars drawn solely from the Western experience, he presents a soberly realistic, thoughtful, and well-written look at the human race's oldest scourge."
By examining the causes of specific ancient and modern wars, Kagan tries to determine the underlying reasons for war in general. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 3, 1995

"Though the volume could have benefited from further editing (and some ethnocentric bias is evident in the use of generic, non- tribal specific terms like 'Great Spirit' and 'conjurer'), the book is nonetheless a major contribution to the study of Native American history and religious studies."
This excellent collection of essays probes the responses of one Native American tribe to the forces of Christianity. Read full book review >
W.E.B. DU BOIS by W.E.B. Du Bois
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 2, 1995

"An indispensable—and remarkably relevant—assemblage of writings."
W.E.B. Du Bois lived nearly a century, from 1868 to 1963. Read full book review >
OUT OF EGYPT by Andre Aciman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A skillful portrayal of an extraordinary clan."
Aciman (French Literature/Princeton) delivers a clear- eyed eulogy of a lost past and a family in decline. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A rare work that successfully distills a whole philosophical debate into a few accessible pages."
A crisp and spirited argument for the near-total separation of church and state, by a former New York federal judge (Partisan Justice, 1980). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"His book is most likely to be read by Democrats, but its lessons should be taken to heart by all who care about our nation's future. (Author tour)"
President Clinton's pollster charts a course for US politics through the current turbulent period and beyond. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"This brave piece of social criticism answers Lasch's critics with a message so simple and obvious, it's sublime. (First serial to Harper's)"
A sure sign that Lasch's latest (and, sadly, last) book deserves wide acclaim is that it will infuriate those who cling to conventional notions of left and right. Read full book review >
HOSPITAL by Sydney Lewis
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A mountain of raw material out of which a useful book could have been shaped."
In her debut, Studs Terkel protÇgÇe Lewis fumbles an attempt to create a portrait of Chicago's Cook County Hospital by recording the voices of its staff and a few patients. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A startling, revealing look at photographic representation and its effect on African-American identity and consciousness."
A provocative exploration of how African-Americans have, and more often have not, participated in the creation of their image through photographs. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"For its sensitivity to the rights of victims and defendants alike, a remarkable work."
This sharp, sensible, ``angry'' book explores how four classes of disempowered Americans look to the criminal justice system to vindicate past grievances, and how the courts too often betray them. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Although Loewen often is entertaining, he presents both an indictment that rings true and an eloquent call to action. (40 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
A decade and a half ago, in America Revised, Frances FitzGerald demonstrated that widely used school textbooks presented simplistic, fatuous, and often inaccurate versions of American history. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >