History Book Reviews (page 928)

HISTORY
Released: June 22, 1994

"Absorbing and poignant. (Author tour)"
Wilson (Retreat, Hell!, 1988) movingly relates a small event in the Vietnam War—a night attack by North Vietnamese soldiers on Fire Base Tomahawk, a hill held by American troops—and its large effects on an ordinary Kentucky town. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 21, 1994

"Chandler fits persuasive, albeit circumstantial, evidence into the puzzle of Lewis's death, situating it in the country's turbulent early era, but ultimately does not fill all the gaps and unknowns. (20 b&w photos, not seen)"
Chandler sets out to prove that the mysterious death in 1809 of explorer Meriwether Lewis was a murder and that the plot was masterminded by an ally of former president Thomas Jefferson and sanctioned by Jefferson himself. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 20, 1994

"An engrossing look behind one of the decade's most dramatic moments."
An objective, well-researched historical backdrop to the Israeli-Palestinian peace accord, by a Washington-based reporter. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 15, 1994

"Giles's book, at least, shows us how the turmoil related to the true achievement."
An authoritative and weighty history of France's Fourth Republic (1946-58) by the former Paris correspondent for the Times of London. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 14, 1994

"The Way to Xanadu is a testament to one woman's dauntless intellectual curiosity and an exquisitely crafted paean to a great poem and to the timeless march of human inquiry and imagination."
In this enchanting book, Alexander (One Dry Season, 1989) chronicles her journeys to the exotic places that inspired Coleridge's masterpiece ``Kubla Khan.'' In 1797 or 1798, in an opium-induced reverie, the poet wrote of Xanadu, with its ``walls and towers...girdled round,'' its ``caves of ice,'' its ``mighty fountain,'' and ``Mount Abora.'' Yet the poem's most arresting images are based not on actual visits made by Coleridge, but on written accounts of them penned by others—from Marco Polo to 18th-century American botanists. Read full book review >

THE COLD WAR by Martin Walker
HISTORY
Released: June 9, 1994

Absorbing history spanning five complex decades of geopolitics and economics with clarity and panache. Read full book review >
AMADOR by Fernando Savater
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 7, 1994

"De Magistro,'' of whose style Savater's will remind the reader."
A sometimes touching but ultimately banal discourse by a father to his son, offering advice on how to get along in life. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 6, 1994

"Epic, engrossing, big."
A one-volume edition of Hamilton's (JFK: Reckless Youth, 1992) three-volume biography, which won the Whitbread Award. Read full book review >
6/6/1944 by Gerald Astor
HISTORY
Released: June 6, 1994

"The consistently absorbing text has 24 pages of contemporary photographs. (First printing of 65,000)"
June 6, 1994, marks the 50th anniversary of D-day. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 6, 1994

"A brilliant account that blends perfectly the human and the strategic dimensions of this great battle."
A splendid, moving, and authoritative account of the most decisive day of WW II by Ambrose (History/Univ. of New Orleans), whose massive biographies of Eisenhower and Nixon have won widespread praise. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 6, 1994

"Riveting soldier's-eye views of the deadly confusion of battle, and a significant contribution to military and D-day literature."
Relying on correspondence, diaries, and interviews, Miller (The House of Getty, not reviewed) presents vivid first-person perspectives from British, German, and American combatants in the Allied invasion of Normandy. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 6, 1994

"Eloquent testimony for posterity, reminding us that military campaigns, however just, have awful costs."
While the 50th anniversary of D-day is being commemorated in many ways, few will be as affecting as the episodic journal of Marie Osmont, an aristocratic Frenchwoman who endured four comparatively pacific years of German occupation and three hellish months of liberation. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Melissa Sweet
author of SOME WRITER!
September 26, 2016

“SOME PIG,” Charlotte the spider’s praise for Wilbur, is just one fondly remembered snippet from E. B. White’s Charlotte’s Web. In Some Writer!, two-time Caldecott Honor winner and 2014 Kirkus Prize finalist Melissa Sweet mixes White’s personal letters, photos, and family ephemera with her own exquisite artwork to tell his story, from his birth in 1899 to his death in 1985. Budding young writers will be fascinated and inspired by the journalist, New Yorker contributor, and children’s book author who loved words his whole life. This authorized tribute is the first fully illustrated biography of E. B. White and includes an afterword by Martha White, E. B. White's granddaughter. “Like Charlotte, Sweet spins a terrific story,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A masterful biography that will enchant young readers.” View video >