History Book Reviews (page 928)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 22, 1994

"The answer would have been of interest to the hundreds of thousands who died on the Cold War's proxy battlefields."
Rodman swerves from objective scholarship to partisan cheerleading in this chronicle of the struggle between the US and the Soviet Union for control in the Third World. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 22, 1994

"Articulately partisan critiques of the volatile and evolving state of the union."
Another 175 pieces of Will's lively, inquiring mind. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 21, 1994

"Davis's memoir of her struggle to think for herself while buffeted by love and ideology is an agonizingly human account of one of history's most tormented decades."
An outstanding memoir of young motherhood, love, political dedication, and madness in the 1930s. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 20, 1994

"Despite compelling material, Zuroff's sludgily bureaucratic- academic prose style manages to stifle much of this important book's impact."
The murderers are still among us, but Zuroff, coordinator of Nazi war crimes research for the Simon Wiesenthal Center, and others like him continue to hunt them; retelling the story of this quest ought to be more exciting. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 18, 1994

"For MAD purists, this lumpy narrative is further proof that, after Kurtzman, it's been all downhill."
A pop-culture prodigy and shameless self-promoter, DeBartolo manages to make MAD's 42-year history as sanitized as a Disney classic. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 18, 1994

"Newcomers will learn a great deal from the author's inspired conceptualization but will need frequent respites from the flood of humanity he presents. (48 pages photos, not seen)"
Egerton's examination of the South in the period immediately preceding the civil rights movement is less history through group biography than history through cameo appearance. Read full book review >
PHILIP JOHNSON by Franz Schulze
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 17, 1994

"An expansive view of Johnson's prickly intellect, ambition, and shifting aesthetic core. (125 photos, not seen)"
Spry and readable, this first major Johnson biography delivers the goods on the puckish 87-year-old godfather of American architecture. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 16, 1994

"A spirited account."
A lively recounting of how a ring of Islamic extremists engineered the most ambitious terrorist attack in America to date- -the 1993 bombing of Manhattan's World Trade Center. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 16, 1994

"Neufeld deserves his due for thorough research of both German and American archives, but his analysis is questionable and the writing is not up to the potential of the narrative."
A dry history of the Nazi rocket program, concentrating on the development of liquid fuels for missiles. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 16, 1994

"A pathbreaking, superb contribution to Holocaust studies."
Bauer offers an eye-opening look into the following question: Could Jewish leaders in America, England, Palestine, and occupied Europe itself have ransomed significant numbers of their brethren? Read full book review >
THE HOLLOW YEARS by Eugen Weber
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 14, 1994

"An eloquent and thoughtful look at France in the interwar period."
Weber (European History/UCLA; France, Fin de Siäcle, 1986; etc.) skillfully paints a somber portrait of France in decline. Read full book review >
QUEST FOR THE PRESIDENCY 1992 by Peter Goldman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 14, 1994

A fly-in-campaign-headquarters perspective on the last presidential race, written by Newsweek's special election team, several of whose members also worked on Quest for the Presidency 1988 (1989). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >