History Book Reviews (page 928)

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"But King's brief treatment leaves too many important questions unexplored, and the result is ultimately unsatisfying. (16 b&w photos, not seen)"
It is a maxim of social theory that slavery wreaked its greatest destruction on the black family. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"The book bears some signs of haste in its composition, but its somber and persuasive message should gain it wide and deserved attention."
A courageous book by one of the most distinguished living Irishmen (now pro-chancellor of the University of Dublin and an editor of both the Observer and the Atlantic Monthly), which slices through the superficial optimism currently prevailing about Northern Ireland. Read full book review >

SHELL GAME by Peter Mantius
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Mantius offers a wealth of circumstantial and documentary evidence of egregious improprieties as well as questionable judgments in high places. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
An attention-grabbing rundown on the tangled web woven around a diminutive Sunbelt bank that helped underwrite many of Saddam Hussein's more dubious development programs. Read full book review >
PUSHKIN by Robin Edmonds
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 28, 1995

"Still, to the reader looking for access to Pushkin and Russian history, this should provide an adequate point of entry."
A study of Russia's great writer in his historical context, this conveys the stifling atmosphere of 19th-century tsarist Russia without illuminating Pushkin's literary genius. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 27, 1995

"For a spirited introduction to the midcentury American literary avant-garde, curious readers could do far worse than to start here. (photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
A highly entertaining group biography of Kerouac, Ginsberg, Burroughs, and company that skimps on literary criticism but plumbs the Beats' dramatic lives with not-quite-prurient gusto. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 22, 1995

Two centuries of German history are brought into focus through the lens of a strategically placed, highly interesting family. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 21, 1995

"Voices a theory of history that is not as silent as the author assumes."
Rehearsing a well-worn theory about the indivisibility of power from human discourse, the author views history through a distinctly postmodern lens. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 20, 1995

"Not a landmark contribution to historical scholarship, but a pleasant reflection on the possibilities of friendship."
In a limpidly written tribute to the friendship that epitomized the ``special relationship'' between Britain and the US, Alldritt (English/Univ. of British Columbia; Churchill the Writer, 1993, not reviewed, etc.) celebrates FDR and Winston Churchill's fateful association. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 17, 1995

"A standout in a genre notable for first-rate entries. (18 b&w photos, charts)"
A sturdy, often affecting memoir of service on and off an American submarine in WW II's Pacific theater. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 17, 1995

"Provocative and convincing reading that will doubtless earn Gitlin demerits from the PC orthodox. (Author tour)"
A noted cultural historian prophesies the demise of the American Left in the current battles over political correctness. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 16, 1995

"British intelligence'' seem to have been almost an oxymoron. (24 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
An account of the life of the man at the center of British intelligence for much of the postwar period; Bower (The Paperclip Conspiracy, 1988, etc.) suggests that the bureau's failures were even more profound than previously suspected. Read full book review >
NEGOTIATIONS, 1972-1990 by Gilles Deleuze
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 16, 1995

"After all, it is so much easier to turn on a television set than to wade through outdated, obscure, and unexceptional philosophy from a B-side thinker."
Fellow philosopher Michel Foucault once opined that ``maybe one day we'll see the century as Deleuzian.'' This awkward collection of interviews, letters, and the occasional essay does its best to prove him wrong. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >