History Book Reviews (page 930)

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A startling, revealing look at photographic representation and its effect on African-American identity and consciousness."
A provocative exploration of how African-Americans have, and more often have not, participated in the creation of their image through photographs. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"For its sensitivity to the rights of victims and defendants alike, a remarkable work."
This sharp, sensible, ``angry'' book explores how four classes of disempowered Americans look to the criminal justice system to vindicate past grievances, and how the courts too often betray them. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Although Loewen often is entertaining, he presents both an indictment that rings true and an eloquent call to action. (40 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
A decade and a half ago, in America Revised, Frances FitzGerald demonstrated that widely used school textbooks presented simplistic, fatuous, and often inaccurate versions of American history. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Like the curate's egg, good in parts."
An East German psychotherapist explores, in an occasionally affecting way, the experience of living within a totalitarian system. Read full book review >
RAJIV GANDHI AND RAMA'S KINGDOM by Ved Mehta
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Mehta's innocent faith in market forces and progress make a complicated story meaningful but also perpetuate Western anxieties about the alien, unpredictable, and menacing character of modern India. (3 illustrations, not seen)"
Essays (most originally published in the New Yorker) providing a lucid account of the chaotic course of Indian politics since 1982. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"An important depiction of recent Chinese history too quickly being forgotten in the rush to seek trade with China."
This graphic account of the horrors of the Chinese Cultural Revolution will put to rest any remaining romantic notions about Chairman Mao. Read full book review >
MEMOIRS OF A WARSAW GHETTO FIGHTER by Simha Rotem
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"4 pages photos, not seen)."
The candid, fast-moving memoir of a significant member of the Warsaw Ghetto's fighting underground. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

There's a double entendre, likely intended, in the title. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Almost certainly the best book on this subject that we are likely to see."
This account of the Cambridge Spy Ring is so knowledgeable and full of insight that it sweeps the competition from the field. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A more lively tale of early Clintonism than some of the recent overviews."
A nifty case study of the tangled trail—from policy idea to law—of the bill that established the National and Community Service Trust Act of 1993, the program known as AmeriCorps. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"This falls considerably short of its potential as a major study of the tragic destruction of the Amazon and its indigenous people. (24 pages b&w photos, maps, not seen)"
Though chilling, this unfocused narrative fails to illuminate the purported relationship between Nelson Rockefeller, missionaries in South America, and the modern genocide of Amazonian Indians. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Howard says is needed to reform our regulatory system."
Attorney Howard makes an obvious but important point by decrying a system of governmental regulations whose complexity and detail often cause more harm than good; but his solutions are vague and quixotic. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >