History Book Reviews (page 930)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 11, 1994

"In all, Nardi's letters are less revealing of the woman or poet than of the dysfunctional personality who brought out the best in some very talented people, including O'Neil."
Marcia Nardi (1901-90) was the anonymous female Williams quoted in Paterson (1946), using her letters to represent either the deprived misunderstood poet or the isolated unconventional woman. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 9, 1994

"No simple answers here but perceptive insights intelligently presented."
A well-informed, convincing analysis of the most oppressive regimes of our century and what we can learn from them for the future, by Chirot (Political science/Northwestern; Social Change in the Modern Era, etc.—not reviewed). Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 1994

"Not all things to all readers, but a varied pasture for literate browsers."
Essays, articles, and reviews from the past few years by scholar and classicist Knox (The Oldest Dead White European Males, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 2, 1994

"In all, an authoritative and accessible survey of a life-or- death issue. (Maps; 16 pages of b&w photos—not seen)"
A grim reminder that much of the post-cold war world remains armed and dangerous. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Reading through it is immensely rewarding—like having an hourlong, tell-all phone conversation with a close friend."
A moving, eloquent assortment of personal writings from the diaries of contemporary black women, collected by Bell-Scott (coeditor: Doublestitch: Black Women Write About Mothers and Daughters, 1991—not reviewed) and including excerpts from Alice Walker, Audrey Lorde, Rita Dove, Jamaica Kincaid, and others, as well as selections from lesser-known, unpublished writers. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Thought-provoking, if dry, historical fare for the intelligent nonexpert."
Blum (formerly History/Princeton; the scholarly The End of the World Order in Rural Europe, etc.—not reviewed) offers a detailed, if pedestrian, analysis of a remarkable decade. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"In brief, then, an academic's examination of a presumptive pathology, which will strike many readers as rotten to the Corps. (Photos, line drawings, and maps.)"
In a revision of his 1990 doctoral dissertation, Cameron (History/Old Dominion Univ.) attempts to anatomize the esprit of the 1st Division of the US Marine Corps on the basis of its performance during WW II and after. Read full book review >
DENG XIAOPING by Richard Evans
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Excruciatingly circumstantial, yet as comprehensive a look at the hitherto shadowy leader as we're likely to have any time soon. (Eight pages of photographs—not seen)"
From a prominent Sinologist, once British ambassador in Peking: an authoritative if numbingly detailed biography of the aging communist revolutionary and leader. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Davidson has his biases, and they show—but so, too, do his great affection and goodwill for a continent too often maligned or ignored."
A mixed bag of 20 essays and lectures (most reprinted from The New Statesman and other journals) by Africa-expert Davidson (The Black Man's Burden, 1992, etc.), selected by the author in commemoration of his 80th birthday. Read full book review >
RED AZALEA by Anchee Min
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"A haunting and quietly dramatic coming-of-age story with a cultural cataclysm as its backdrop."
Fascinating memoir of a young Chinese girl during the collapse of the Maoist regime. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"As an addition to the genre of Gulag literature, a remarkable and heroic story, recounted with great simplicity and nobility."
Nineteen years in Mao's labor camps—as chronicled by Wu (resident scholar at the Hoover Institution) and Wakeman (To the Storm—not reviewed). Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Copious footnotes and appendices pad the sometimes uneven text, but Vernon's research adds a valuable chapter to the story of African-American contributions."
An affectionate tribute to the resilience and innovativeness of the African-Americans of a small farming community in South Carolina's pine belt. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >