History Book Reviews (page 930)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 14, 1992

"A fair-minded and balanced report, backed by extensive research."
Davis—coauthor of Kelley (1987), the autobiography of former FBI director Clarence M. Kelley—delves into the FBI's secret counterintelligence program (COINTELPRO), which from 1956 to 1971 aimed to stifle dissent among domestic radical groups. J. Edgar Hoover, Davis explains, obtained a vast charter for the FBI to monitor domestic intelligence when FDR signed a special directive just prior to WW II, and managed to get the National Security Council to expand the FBI's portfolio in this arena in 1956. Read full book review >
INSIDE CAMPAIGN FINANCE by Frank J. Sorauf
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 13, 1992

"The evenhanded text includes an abundance of tabular material—not seen."
A rigorously revisionist, if somewhat detached, view of the supporting role money has played in American political campaigns since Watergate-instigated modification of the electoral regulatory regime. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 10, 1992

"Disheartening: a 'portrait' painted in simplified strokes and with no perspective."
Manchester, temporarily putting aside his rousing Churchill series (The Last Lion), offers a disappointing retread of past histories about the explosive dawn of the modern age. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 8, 1992

An informed and evenhanded critique of the ``creeping professionalism'' that imperils American sport; by an activist observer with impeccable credentials. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 4, 1992

"Still, a provocative and sobering assessment of how self-government's reach can exceed its grasp."
An angry inquiry into the putative decline of democracy in the US. Read full book review >

FORTY DAYS by Bob Simon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 4, 1992

"The involving testament of a man who's been to the brink and learned that the abyss does indeed stare back."
An affecting first-person account of the ordeal endured by one of the most celebrated casualties of the Persian Gulf War. Read full book review >
A HISTORY OF THE JEWS IN AMERICA by Howard M. Sachar
HISTORY
Released: May 2, 1992

With this comprehensive, insightful, and spirited opus, Sachar (Modern History/George Washington Univ.; A History of Israel, 1976 and 1977, etc.) rises to the position of preeminent Jewish historian of our day. Read full book review >
CROSSING THE POSTMODERN DIVIDE by Albert Borgmann
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1992

"Not a light read—and never disingenuous."
Rather astoundingly large-minded vision of the nature of humanity, civilization, and science, by Borgmann (Philosophy/Univ. of Montana at Missoula). Read full book review >
PACIFIC RIFT by Michael Lewis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1992

An inquiry into sociological divergences that, for all its apparent artlessness and deceptive brevity, goes a long way toward explaining precisely what strains the commercial ties that still bind the US and Japan. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1992

"Extraordinary in so many ways, Sartre's 1924-39 letters illuminate his evolving thought and his groundbreaking relationship with Beauvoir—perhaps at its finest in their exchange of written words."
Only three months after Simone de Beauvoir's Letters to Sartre appeared in English, we now have a fine translation of the other side of this rightfully legendary correspondence. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1992

"A first-rate history with appeal for general readers as well as specialists."
A masterful overview of how President Truman restructured the US military in the face of determined opposition from officer elites and of the grave problems attendant on the new cold war. Read full book review >
INSTINCT FOR SURVIVAL by II Hoy
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1992

"Able writing, but hobbled by uncertain focus. (Five illustrations.)"
Rambling essays on the author's character formation as he was reared in the South, and on the meaning of masculinity, inner life in the military, and his way of writing essays. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >