History Book Reviews (page 930)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"This analysis of an important American educational story is somewhat plodding and dry, but the end result is coherent and insightful."
An authoritative study of the emergence of Jewish studies on the American campus. Read full book review >
LONDON by John Russell
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Russell for the most part offers the armchair traveler and the inquiring mind alike five-star service. (183 illustrations, 86 in color) (Book-of-the-Month Club dividend selection)"
An elegantly idiosyncratic, leisurely and—at its most successful—revealing stroll through London's highways and byways that transcends the coffee-table genre. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"While Altshuler does raise valid points, his argument neglects today's increasingly conservative climate for art funding; many avant-garde artists whose grants have recently been withdrawn or their applications denied might feel less than coddled and coopted."
The questionable premise of this data-packed book is that the avant-garde is dead, that the isolated artist spurned by a ridiculing public no longer exists, and that today challenging art is readily brought into mainstream venues. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"The lack of footnotes or other documentation is further evidence that this is an intellectually shoddy book. (32 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Caveat emptor: This is most definitely not ``the history'' of the Jews. Read full book review >
HARRY S. TRUMAN by Robert H. Ferrell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"An incisive study of a gutsy underdog who rose to the occasion."
An estimable biography that portrays Truman, the patron saint of beleaguered pols, as an ordinary American but an extraordinary president. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"A lively, penetrating follow-up to Holocaust readings that speaks volumes about the resiliency of the Jewish people."
A richly descriptive and insightful survey of post-Holocaust European Jewry. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Though hardly groundbreaking, this collection of interviews presents an engrossing portrait of Nixon and his troubled administrations."
In the manner of their oral history of JFK's administration (Let Us Begin Anew, 1993), the Strobers present a vast miscellany of musings about Nixon and his administration by insiders, Cabinet members, and other contemporaries. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Some good new material on an eternally intriguing subject, marred by the unexplained absence of later KGB material and the author's readiness to embellish his tapes of Philby with lengthy conversations reconstructed from what he thinks may have occurred."
Soviet spy Kim Philby, discreet to the last, speaks at length here about his career without saying much new, but his KGB file is more revealing. Read full book review >
THE UNEMPLOYED FORTUNE-TELLER by Charles Simic
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

In this short collection of essays (some previously published in Antaeus and other literary reviews), Pulitzer Prizewinning poet Simic (Hotel Insomnia, 1992, etc.) brings off a masterfully casual beauty, whether discussing the creation of poetry and the poet's social role, praising food and the blues, or relating the travails of youth. Read full book review >
THE WORLD OF RICHARD STINE by Richard Stine
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 26, 1994

Popular greeting-card illustrator Stine (Off to Sea, not reviewed) showcases his seductive full-color drawings and pithy texts, which give the subject of metaphysical angst in the '90s a decidedly mass-market spin. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 26, 1994

"If less intense than his earlier memoir's portrayal of a troubled childhood, this candid work evenly weighs the many costs and few gains of coming of age in a war."
Wolff continues his memoirs in this excellent volume, with his keen prose, dispassionate mordancy, and writer's attention to mood and characters applied to Vietnam's moral absurdity. Read full book review >
KILLING CUSTER by James Welch
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 24, 1994

"An excellent Native version of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: a sad tale that, despite momentary triumphs like Little Big Horn, could not but end tragically for the Indians. (Author tour)"
In his first nonfiction work, noted Native American novelist Welch (The Indian Lawyer, 1990, etc.) stretches the boundaries of history. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >