History Book Reviews (page 936)

HISTORY
Released: Oct. 21, 1994

"Shallow, but exciting all the same. (8 pages of photos, not seen)"
A lively, albeit not very scholarly, account of Jan Karski's role in the WW II Polish underground. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 21, 1994

"Parachute journal-ism. (Maps, not seen)"
A frustratingly incomplete, often meandering collection of interviews that shines only intermittent light on the Balkan conflict. Read full book review >

WEDGE by Mark Riebling
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 21, 1994

"A history of American spy versus American cop written in a manner as informative as any treatise and as entertaining as the best espionage novels."
A brilliant first book chronicling the bitter rivalry of the FBI and CIA from WW II, when the CIA had its roots in the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), through the present. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 19, 1994

"Less popular than H. Paul Jeffers's Commissioner Roosevelt (p. 905), which also limns the woes of old Manhattan: a painful reminder that New York was once a city on the rise."
Four scholarly glimpses of 19th-century New York City, adding up to a dull but informative portrait of an urban community in search of its soul. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 19, 1994

"His depiction of the interplay between ancient history and its manipulation by nations, quacks, and petty academics is terrific."
International intrigue, scholarly arrogance, and eccentric personalities populate this examination of what the Dead Sea Scrolls really tell us. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 19, 1994

"Quinn performs his task in a richly straightforward way, depicting his colorful cast with a keen sense of the delicate meshing of the personal and the historical."
Quinn, fresh from his exploration of early America in A New World ( p. 535), takes on the early days of gold-rush California through the story of two men whose political and personal rivalry was to end in tragedy. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 17, 1994

"Kalb presents the story of Nixon's rehabilitation as great and appalling copy, and gives the reader an illuminating peek into some of the darker recesses of the world inside the Beltway."
The distinguished former foreign correspondent for CBS and NBC news looks wryly and critically at a 1992 foray into foreign policy by Richard Nixon—and along the way, shows how politicians and press pundits manipulate one another to shape political consensus. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 17, 1994

"Such dramatic narrative is unexpected in a book devoted to a subject that would at first appear to be of interest only to West Point cadets and jarheads. (Author tour)"
Hallahan's polemic against internal regulations within the national armaments industry is also a history of America's war machine since the founding of the Springfield Arsenal during the Revolution. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 17, 1994

"This topic deserves either tougher reporting or an over-the- top satirist like Dave Barry. (8 pages of photos, not seen.) (Author tour)"
A mildly amusing tour de Capitol Hill based on some reporting forays and armchair rumination by a veteran Washington journalist. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 14, 1994

"To-the-point essays on the role of drama in America and, indirectly, the life and health of the arts."
A clever title for what is essentially a grab-bag collection of think pieces, reviews, and profiles by the founder of the American Repertory Theatre at Harvard and drama critic for The New Republic. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 14, 1994

"Despite its flaws, a useful history of a relatively undercovered aspect of the Civil War. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
An authoritative account from Civil War historian Davis (Jefferson Davis: The Man and His Hour, 1991) of the would-be Founding Fathers of the Confederacy. Read full book review >
BLACKFACE by Nelson George
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 12, 1994

"A savvy, revealing insider's view of the struggle for films created and controlled by African-Americans in Hollywood. (b&w photos, not seen)"
A textured personal exploration of the last 30 years of African-American cinema. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >