History Book Reviews (page 936)

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 14, 1996

A hard-hitting, persuasive polemic against the ideological perversion of history. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 14, 1996

"Page proves a far better trend-watcher than trend-setter, which is just the role he fills so well in the hit-or-miss venues of opinion columns and TV chat shows."
It's hard to see what's ``impolite'' about Page's buppie neoliberalism, other than a wish that his views were somehow controversial. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 14, 1996

"The story of a particular man and time, but also a finely drawn portrait of a writer and his conscience under siege in a place where the ill-chosen word could lead to exile or death. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
From Rubenstein (Soviet Dissidents, 1980), an admirably objective account of one of the Soviet Union's most unusual icons- -Ilya Ehrenburg, a writer who not only survived the twists and turns of Kremlin politics, but also enjoyed the regard of dissidents like Nadezhda Mandelstam and Anna Akhmatova. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 12, 1996

"All in all, comfort food for those who believe that the Trilateral Commission runs the world and that everything bad is fascist, but of little avail to anyone seeking a principled analysis of the nation's woes."
An uneven collection of broadsides from the counterculture of complaint. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 12, 1996

"And while the essays' honesty and courage are to be commended, they lack the saving humanism and insight of, for example, Orwell's essays from the '30s, qualities that would have kept them otherwise readable and trenchant. (Author tour)"
An outdated, awkward collection of essays on art and politics from one of South Africa's great gadflies. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 9, 1996

"A useful overview of recent American political history."
A solid academic analysis of the American communist movement that draws on recently declassified Soviet documents. Read full book review >
FRANCIS DRAKE by John Cummins
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 5, 1996

"A scholarly but basically laudatory picture, nicely timed for the fourth centenary of Drake's death next year."
A graphic account of the man who, among other swashbuckling exploits, was the first to sail around the world and was largely responsible for saving England from invasion by the Spanish Armada. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"A mixed bag, indeed, but full of interest."
A mixed bag of prescriptions and proscriptions for understanding—and remaking—the world. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"A skillfully told, first-rate examination of the economic and political circumstances that made the American Revolution unavoidable."
In a compellingly argued review of events leading to the 1775 clash at Lexington and Concord, historian Draper (A Very Thin Line, 1991, etc.) contends that the American Revolution was not an ideological battle between democracy and monarchy; it was rather a pure struggle for power on the part of colonies that had experienced a significant but incomplete degree of economic and political self-determination. Read full book review >
BLACK POLICE IN AMERICA by W. Marvin Dulaney
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"A balanced, perceptive, and readable study. (15 b&w photos, not seen)"
A dry but insightful history of black police officers' long struggle against racism. Read full book review >
THE PUBLIC DIMENSION OF FOREIGN POLICY by David D. Newsom
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"A quiet, restrained, but expert and highly professional assessment of the relationship of foreign policy and the public in America."
There may be no country in the world where it is more important to get public approval for foreign policy than the United States, and as Newsom (International Relations/Univ. of Virginia) makes clear in this valuable little book, there may be no country where it is harder to achieve. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"Brent's story reads like a novel concocted to take readers inside the mind of a black revolutionary and revolutionary Cuba; that it is true makes it an important chronicle of our times."
Brent's riveting memoirs of his odyssey through memorable times, from a Louisiana sharecropper's shack to exile in Cuba. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >