History Book Reviews (page 936)

HISTORY
Released: Dec. 6, 1993

"Though couched in well-mannered, even cautious, prose, Murphy's linkages offer a provocative new interpretation of the black American religious experience—one that's likely to inspire Afrocentrics even as it wrinkles the collars of conservative clerics and theologians."
Murphy's Santer°a (1988) was a dramatic firsthand, if scholarly, account of that African-Cuban religion. Read full book review >
GADAFFI by George Tremlett
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 3, 1993

"Of some use but, overall, not a book to inspire full confidence as a source. (Photos)"
A potted revisionist biography of Gaddafi, by Tremlett (Dylan Thomas, 1992). Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Here again, as in too much writing on the Middle East, sincerity has replaced balanced analysis."
A critical and largely one-sided view of modern Zionism and the history of Israel. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Provocative, courageous, certainly stimulating—and reflecting a profound understanding of the often invisible yet potentially insidious relationship between aesthetics and politics, as well as of how art can be used to camouflage the most repugnant ideas."
The obscurities of modern art and literature, according to Carey (English/Oxford; John Donne, 1981), were devised by the intelligentsia to exclude the new reading public for whom they had contempt—a thesis that Carey applies here to, among others, George Gissing, H.G. Wells, Arnold Bennett, and Wyndham Lewis. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Even jaded or knowledgeable Vietnam War-readers will find fresh material here."
Vivid, creative use of oral history (here, with the remembrances woven together by incisive commentary) that takes the conventional combat-report format—induction, boot camp, raw recruit, seasoned vet—and breathes new life into the war experience. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"At once morally repugnant and compelling reading. (Photographs—24 pp. b&w)"
Ninety years of dirt on the British royal family. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Colorful and compelling, with a rich mixture of psychological and logistical details: a skillful distillation of familiar faces and events through a fresh approach that should be of interest to tacticians as well as to those who view history as a patchwork of personalities."
An engaging, insightful review of Civil War strategy as seen through the interactions of the conflict's top commanders. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"A compelling example of the examined life worth living, however painful the cost."
The second volume of Green's autobiography (The Green Paradise, 1992), continuing his exacting and scrupulously frank ``inner exploration''—as he recalls his often lonely adolescence in a time of war. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Although stronger in explaining how we got into the current mess than what's to be done about it, Masons's slant on history— the human-animal orbit—is clever and subversive."
Throw a brick, suggests attorney Mason (coauthor, Animal Factories, 1980), and chances are good that you'll hit a ``dominionist''—someone convinced of the natural superiority of human beings and of their right to exploit all other living things. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Translating emotions over time and across cultures is Miller's major methodological challenge—and he meets it with ranging and learned references, a wry and unpretentious style, and a genuine respect for the power of those ancient, forgotten sources on which modern social exchange depends."
From Vikings to valentines, crimes to dinner invitations, Miller (Law/University of Michigan) here explores the mercurial history of the emotions, attitudes, values, and behaviors associated with honor—its defense, loss, survival, and display- -drawing on evidence from the Greek epics and Icelandic sagas to contemporary horror movies. Read full book review >
PASSPORT TO ASSASSINATION by Oleg Maximovich Nechiporenko
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Frank talk that's of middling interest for spy-fans, of greater interest for assassination buffs. (Photographs)"
A retired KGB colonel tells of his career as a spy—and, particularly, of his meetings with Lee Harvey Oswald in 1963 in Mexico City. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"An eloquent, well-researched study of Israel's most eloquent researcher. (Photographs)"
Thorough, fascinating life of Yigael Yadin (1917-84), the Israeli soldier-archaeologist who both made and remade history. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >