History Book Reviews (page 936)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 12, 1994

"Likewise, he fails to suggest policies for the United States that would stem the potential disaster."
An unusual, hybrid alert—part worthy analysis, part alarmist scenario—to a Canada possibly to be sundered next year by a separatist Quebec. Read full book review >
BLUEPRINT FOR A NEW JAPAN by Ichiro Ozawa
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 12, 1994

"For certain, however, his grand design is in the self-interested tradition of an insular nation-state whose capacity to adapt has not been in serious doubt since the Meiji Restoration. (Maps)"
A master plan for an institutional makeover of Japan from a political insider whose revisionist agenda remains firmly rooted in the ruling class's long-standing preoccupation with national security. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 12, 1994

"An absorbing study of the linkages between personal and diplomatic perspectives— illuminating as historical background in this period of European integration and diminished American power."
Harper (European Studies/Johns Hopkins; America and the Reconstruction of Italy, 1986) creatively melds biography with cultural and diplomatic history in this triptych of portraits of important architects of US policy toward Europe during the ``American Century.'' America's ``historic ambivalence'' toward Europe, the author argues, is reflected in the lives of his three subjects, each of whom decisively influenced America's European policy during and after WW II. Read full book review >
SUMMING UP by Yitzhak Shamir
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 9, 1994

"A useful tool for opponents of the land-for-peace policies of the current Israeli government, but less useful to students of Israeli history or of Yitzhak Shamir."
With freelance writer Samuel, the former prime minister of Israel describes the context in which he developed his political views but reveals little new about himself. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 6, 1994

"Damasio is the first to admit that he cannot prove all he says. In the meantime, one can read with pleasure and share the excitement of a neuroscientist who sees that in the union of the many parts of the human brain lies its strength."
Few neuroscientists today would defend Cartesian dualism—the idea that mind and body are separate—but Damasio takes one more leap: Not only are philosophers wrong to separate brain and body, but psychology's separation of reason from emotion is also wrong. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 2, 1994

"Jeffers inverts Teddy's most famous saying with a book that walks loudly (lots of swaggering by the protagonist and others) and carries a small stick (nary a whack of dissent)."
A fast-paced but toothless report on the crime-busting years of America's toothiest politician: scads of atmosphere and action, no critical bite. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 2, 1994

"A shame only that he could not come up with a better villain than poor old knock-kneed Britain."
Roberti, a former Hong Kong correspondent for AsiaWeek, has followed the convoluted negotiations between China and Britain over the last few years and has produced a formidable narrative of high diplomatic deception and expediency. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 2, 1994

"A rich assemblage of Jewish history, but with the disconcerting organization of a patchwork quilt. (50 b&w photos, not seen)"
A compendium of elegy, emotive description, and thorough research capturing past and present Jewish life in East-Central Europe. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Colin Powell, Texas govenor Ann Richards, or any of 15 other 'candidates."
Imagine this: The American People (whoever they are) require the assistance and good will of a couple of advertising honchos to tell them how to take back the government. Read full book review >
INSIDE SANTA RITA by Sr. Baez
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Proof that not everyone who has a transformative experience should write a book."
A well-intentioned but uninspired memoir by the mother of folk singer Joan Baez. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"No juicy war stories here: just the author's Supreme Court brief annotated and enlarged for the general reader."
An honorable but flat how-I-won-that-case account, by Minnesota defender Cleary. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"The authors may not always be quite as skeptical of statistics as one would like, but this is a hard-headed, clear analysis filled with anecdote and vivid reportage."
A vivid and thoughtful portrait of China by a Pulitzer Prize- winning husband-and-wife team of New York Times correspondents formerly in Beijing. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Laini Taylor
March 27, 2017

In bestselling YA writer Laini Taylor’s new fantasy novel, Strange the Dreamer, the dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he's been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever. What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving? “Lovers of intricate worldbuilding and feverish romance will find this enthralling,” our critic writes. View video >