History Book Reviews (page 938)

HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"Western history is more ignored by historians and the general public'') that shoots itself in the foot through excessive zeal—a charge, ironically, often hurled against the original Reformers. (Fifteen b&w illustrations- -not seen.)"
Ozment (History/Harvard), a specialist in the Reformation (Three Behaim Boys, 1990, The Age of Reform, 1980), digs into the trenches with this popular history of Luther's revolution that doubles as neo-Protestant polemic. Read full book review >
PATRICK'S CORNER by Sean Patrick
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"A nostalgic tribute from the baby of a family—life-affirming, if disappointingly prosaic."
Patrick, a Catholic Digest columnist, offers sentimental reminiscences of growing up Irish and poor in post-WW II America—a tale of shamrocks and hastily muttered Gaelic prayers that never moves beneath the surface. ``Patrick's Corner'' is what Sean and his five older brothers called the intersection in Cleveland where each in turn sold newspapers and performed ten-cent shoeshines for pocket money and to help their widowed mother keep a roof over their heads. Read full book review >

THE SIX WIVES OF HENRY VIII by Alison Weir
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1992

Weir (the genealogical Britain's Royal Family—not reviewed) here uses the many public records and personal letters of the early 1500's to offer a comprehensive, factual version of the tempestuous private and public lives of Henry VIII and his six wives. Read full book review >
BLACK EAGLE CHILD by Ray A. Young Bear
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1992

"A unique account and a milestone in Native American literature. (Photos—not seen.)"
Fascinating and accomplished memoirs in which a Mesquakie poet blends myth, fact, and the unvarnished recollections of a young Native American. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"At a time when revisionists are running ads in college newspapers claiming the Holocaust is a hoax, this affecting memoir should go into every high-school and college library."
Kalib was born in 1931, the beloved youngest child of a wealthy, large, and close-knit family in Bodzentyn, a town of 4000, including 1400 Jews, near Cracow, Poland. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"Intelligent, eminently readable sociopolitical history."
A concise and clear treatment of the diverse issues and social changes that precipitated the Civil War. Read full book review >
THE EAGLE BIRD by Charles F. Wilkinson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1992

"Engaging if not particularly well-integrated, Wilkinson's essays exemplify the land-based ethical systems now developing among progressive western thinkers and honorably maintain the nature-upholding tradition of John Muir and Aldo Leopold."
In 12 pithy essays, an environmental lawyer debunks romantic myths of ranchers, miners, and foresters as ``heroes of the West,'' and denounces ``extreme laissez-faire'' government policies that have allowed these ``heroes'' to devastate the land, water, and air for their private profit. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"Essential for the war scholar's bookshelf; for the generalist, a profoundly moving human document. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Brilliantly realized study of the infamous Vietnam War atrocity in which US soldiers burned a Vietnamese village to the ground, shot the livestock, raped the women, and drove 400 men, women, and children into a ditch to slaughter them with machine- gun fire. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1992

"Herken's clear, well-documented writing and his close attention to the human element make for a fascinating and wisely cautionary study."
Engrossing and enlightening account of the checkered relationship between the scientific community and federal government from the Manhattan Project to SDI, by Herken (The Winning Weapon, 1980). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 28, 1992

"But those who follow current events will appreciate his insights into how Bush's background may affect his presidential actions."
In a slashing jeremiad, Graubard (History/Brown; editor of Daedalus; co-editor, with Carol Gluck, of Showa, p. 1512) indicts George Bush for corrupting democracy by using rhetoric left over from WW II to ``infantilize'' the American people. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 28, 1992

"Crucial to any reevaluation of JFK as President and statesman, this electrifying report portrays a wily, stubborn, conflicted leader who grasped realities that eluded virtually everyone else in the US establishment."
Bold and authoritative revisionist analysis of Kennedy's Vietnam policy, by a US Army major who teaches history at the Univ. of Maryland. Read full book review >
BARCELONA by Robert Hughes
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 28, 1992

"The Gaudí section, which is very good, comes only at a very long book's end, by which time you are weary, and less involved than its great subject merits."
After a rousing introduction that touches on the Spanish Civil War and Miró, Gaudí, and the Barcelonese mania for design and its folk-pride in "seny" (well-proportioned common sense), coexisting with its "tradition of intense, wrenching civic change, of long-shot gambles and risky endeavors," Hughes plunges into the history of the city and of Catalunya entire—and is all but lost in its swamp thereafter. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >