History Book Reviews (page 938)

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 30, 1995

"A notable contribution to the history of Nazi Germany—and a sobering reminder of what can happen when the claims of science, bureaucracy, and expertise go unchallenged."
A chilling documentation of what happened in Germany when the Nazis seized power and put their ideas on eugenics and euthanasia into action. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 30, 1995

"This eloquent, well-written, and depressing review of the folly and tragedy of humankind's recent past is even more oppressive when it looks into what appears to be an unstable future. (32 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A troubling look at world history during the ``Short Twentieth Century,'' from 1914 to 1991. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 25, 1995

"Access to Vietnamese records makes this the definitive closure of a sad chapter in American history and must reading for all those interested in the topic."
A timely and well-presented work that seeks to dispel the myth that there are still American POWs held in Southeast Asia. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 24, 1995

A smoothly readable account of the rapid rise and fall of a tough Vietnamese gang in New York City's Chinatown. Read full book review >
A BEGINNER'S FAITH IN THINGS UNSEEN by John Hay
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 23, 1995

"This memoir shows no diminution in Hay's genius for expressing a powerful and contagious appreciation of nature."
In this eloquent memoir, on the eve of his 80th birthday, Hay (The Bird of Light, 1991) reviews the lessons of a life lived close to nature. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 23, 1995

"A fine narrative history, written in a style suggesting a Tom Clancy thriller, that fills the void left by superficial media reporting."
A candid and gripping look at military leaders interacting with one another and with sensitive allies under enormous pressure during the Gulf War. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 18, 1995

"But again, Erlich's own intellectually hollow polemic isn't it."
The story of the relationship, real and imagined, between the biblical land of Israel and the modern state of Israel, would make a wonderful book—but this extended apology for the perceived faults of modern Jewish nationalism isn't it. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 18, 1995

"Shvets generates interest only when detailing the daily, tedious routines and machinations of undercover spy work."
A former KGB operative offers a melodramatic and often portentous account of his ``spy'' activities while attached to the Soviet embassy in Washington, D.C. Shvets arrived in Washington in 1985, supposedly as a correspondent for the Soviet news agency Tass. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 17, 1995

"Miller reveals, but never really explores, the complexities and inconsistencies of a man who wrote both first-rate fiction and disposable prose."
An engaging, if unchallenging, account of an author whose route into—and out of—literary celebrity makes him seem, for better and worse, a man of his time. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 15, 1995

"A good, coolly analytical review of the Yugoslavian conflict."
A dispassionate, intelligent introduction to the civil war that has destroyed the former Yugoslavia. Read full book review >
THE DREAM OF WATER by Kyoko Mori
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 12, 1995

In a poetic and emotionally charged account of a journey back to her native Japan, Mori creates beautiful scenes even as she uncovers painful truths about her family and her past. Read full book review >
THE TWILIGHT OF DEMOCRACY by Patrick E. Kennon
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 12, 1995

"But his is a technocratic vision of national well-being."
A former CIA analyst hunts unsuccessfully for the reason why, if democracy seems so triumphant in the wake of communism's collapse, democratic nations such as the US, Japan, Germany, and the UK are suffering from angst and domestic discord. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >