History Book Reviews (page 938)

JOHN C. CALHOUN by Irving H. Bartlett
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 25, 1993

"A fine contribution to antebellum scholarship."
A scholarly, limpid life of the southern statesman and nullifier. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 25, 1993

"A tasty historical potpourri, prepared with style."
A compilation of mostly captivating thoughts on the American way, as expressed in articles, book reviews, etc., by Yale history professor Blum (Years of Discord, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 25, 1993

"Worst-case scenarios that afford fans of the doomsday genre a multiple choice of bang-or-whimper endings for a weary world."
An appraisal of armed conflict that will strike most readers as a typically slick Alvin Toffler production—despite the byline given to wife Heidi and the bulletin that Alvin wrote Future Shock, The Third Wave, and other bestsellers with her help. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 22, 1993

Flagellatory mea culpa from a reformed North Korean terrorist who, in 1987, blew up a South Korean airliner, killing all 115 aboard. Read full book review >
JANE AUSTEN'S THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND by Jane Austen
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 22, 1993

"Still, Mandelbaum's collection has a certain novelty interest and, for manic completists, it no doubt will prove a must."
It's a truism that writers, like musicians, must practice their scales before they take flight. Read full book review >

PRESIDENT KENNEDY by Richard Reeves
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 21, 1993

"Neither Camelot elegy nor scathing revisionism—but the kind of cool, dispassionate narrative that JFK himself might have appreciated."
Behind the scenes in the Kennedy Administration—in well- documented, unusually revealing depth. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 18, 1993

"Full of fascinating, sometimes brilliant, insight into the politics of the area and its impact on those entrusted with US policy."
An analysis of the evolution of US policy toward the Middle East—as well as of the foreign-policy elite that guided it—that goes far deeper than the headlines. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 18, 1993

"Notes from a reluctant sojourner whose trip through the past yielded remarkably few insights worth sharing. (Eighteen photographs)"
A journalist's self-absorbed and ultimately pointless report on his search for the truth about a celebrated forebear who'd disowned him. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 15, 1993

"Clemenceau remains an enigma here but his era comes alive through Dallas's high-flown but lively approach. (Twenty-four pages of b&w illustrations)"
Idiosyncratic but vivid account of the times—and, less successfully, the life—of the great WW I French leader Georges Clemenceau (1841-1929). Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 15, 1993

"Powerful, though, for its two-fold message: that America must do more to educate Latinos (our fastest growing minority), and that freedom of thought belongs to everyone."
A young man's appraisal—Navarrette is only 25 now—of his turbulent years as a Mexican-American undergraduate at one of the nation's most prestigious universities. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 15, 1993

Powerful testimony from 29 German women survivors of the Third Reich that provides not only a stunning portrait of life on the home front but also insights into a society that spawned both Hitler and the Holocaust. Read full book review >
MOLOTOV REMEMBERS by Albert Resis
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 15, 1993

"An important resource for future Soviet studies, Molotov's words also provide a mesmerizing and chilling chronicle of how the Marxist dream mutated into the Soviet nightmare—and of how power, once again, corrupted absolutely."
V.M. Molotov (1890-1986) rose to power with Lenin, serving briefly as the USSR's premier before Stalin's ascent and then as foreign minister during Stalin's reign and afterward. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 4, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >