History Book Reviews (page 938)

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Ayers succeeds in depicting the post-Reconstruction South not as a repressed backwater of American life, but as a region that, despite substantial injustices, made significant contributions to American life."
A uniquely comprehensive cultural, political, and social history of post-Reconstruction, exploring not only ``the South's deep poverty and institutionalized injustice'' but also ``the complexity of experience in the new South.'' Ayers (History/Univ. of Virginia; Vengeance and Justice, 1983) aims ``to understand what it meant to live in the American South in the years after Reconstruction.'' To achieve this, he examines the matrix of economic and societal forces that shaped the South's singular culture. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Lively, intelligent, clarifying—a well-timed response that may catch the eye of Susan Faludi's, if not Bly's, readers."
Twenty stimulating, often passionate essays by feminists whose styles vary remarkably but whose message remains the same—that most forms of the current 'men's movement' reinforce patriarchy and widen the gap between men and women just when, for the sake of our children, ourselves, and the environment, we most need to work together. 'Make no mistake about it,' Gloria Steinem writes in her foreword, 'women want a men's movement. Read full book review >

COMING OUT CONSERVATIVE by Marvin Liebman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"An absorbing, occasionally awkward book given resonance by the author's struggle with—and final acceptance of—his homosexuality. (Sixteen pages of photographs—not seen.)"
An eventful, stylish, sometimes painful memoir by right-wing agitator Liebman. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A well-told tale of a paradigmatic warrior. (Sixteen pages of b&w photos—not seen.)"
A fine appreciation of the military professional who arguably ranks among America's very best generals. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A provocative, detailed view, if somewhat disorganized and repetitious, offering ample evidence that the war was far from over after the soldiers went home."
A careful assessment of the environmental damage wrought by both sides in Operation Desert Storm, locally and globally, from Boston-based science-writer Hawley. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Familiar examples and few new insights, but, still, a cogent and evenhanded summary of generally available information about the influence of TV on politicking. (Forty halftones, ten graphs—not seen.)"
An attempt to determine the extent to which TV has contributed to the manipulation of political campaigns—and what can be done about it; by Jamieson (Communication/Univ. of Penn.; Eloquence in an Electronic Age, 1988, etc.). Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Lurid and delightful: Rider Haggard couldn't ask for more. (Thirty-two b&w photos.)"
A mad curiosity carries an apparently sane young man to a lost German colony in Paraguay. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Lively capsule histories lend zest to each writer's empowering Paris years. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs- -not seen.)"
Lively survey of American writers in Paris from the liberation in 1944 through 1960, ending with the invasion of the Beats. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Authoritative, accessible, absorbing. (Photos, maps, 16-page color insert—not seen.)"
Time has not been kind to the Philistines. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A brilliantly reported, if occasionally repetitive, account of geopolitical rivalry as a blood sport. (Eight-page photo insert— not seen.)"
A stranger-than-fiction thriller that puts the bitter conflict between the People's Republic of China (PRC) and Taiwan into clear, human perspective. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"But, unaccountably, he has little to say here that's provocative, unorthodox, witty, epigrammatic, or illuminating—in short, there's little of the creative touch he aims to honor. (Book-of-the-Month Dual Selection for November)"
From the Pulitzer-winning former Librarian of Congress—a readable but often pallid counterpart to The Discoverers (1983), examining ``how creators in all the arts have enlarged, embellished, fantasized, and filigreed our experience.'' Here, as in The Discoverers, Boorstin (Hidden History, 1987, etc.) paints a triumphal history that celebrates the march of human progress—from the Judeo-Christian tradition of a creator-God to the modernist exploration of the self in Proust, Kafka, and Virginia Woolf. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Readable but only half-satisfying pop-history—more for assassination buffs (Smith brings together many sources) than for fanciers of theater history. (B&w photos—not seen.)"
The Booth family's important place in theater history has often been overshadowed or obscured by the notoriety of John Wilkes. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >