History Book Reviews (page 938)

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Despite inevitable blemishes: a truly indispensable volume."
The latest in a long line of chatty demi-reference books for crime mavens (cf. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Tightly knit, wide-ranging, and well researched — with Gibson's own experience as a Gunsite Ranch trainee recounted: a profoundly troubling assessment of America at risk."
Powerful, deadly trends now present in US society are traced to a loss of male self-esteem and national pride following our defeat in Vietnam — in this fluid, captivating analysis from Gibson (Sociology/California State University; The Perfect War, 1986). Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 27, 1994

"An absorbing and authoritative account with substantial appeal to a general readership. (Twenty photos and five maps—not seen)"
While scholars and soldiers have long debated the Falaise campaign that developed within weeks of the 1944 invasion of occupied France, Blumenson (the US Army's official historian; Patton, 1985, etc.) offers a savvy, comprehensive overview of the battle that might well have brought WW II to an earlier end in the European theater. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 26, 1994

"This is Hamlet not only without the prince, but without the king as well: a singularly absurd study."
A flawed and sometimes fantastic effort to link American anti- Communism to the ``demons of the American soul,'' by Marxist psychiatrist Kovel (Social Studies/Bard; The Age of Desire, 1981, etc.). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 26, 1994

"Nothing new, and nothing not said better before."
A Republican loyalist's version of the obvious. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 26, 1994

A provocative dual biography that sets out to recast Simone de Beauvoir as the ``true philosopher'' in her legendary relationship with Jean-Paul Sartre; by the Fullbrooks (she: Literary Studies/Univ. of the West of England; he: a freelance writer). Read full book review >
CUTTING FOR SIGN by William Langewiesche
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 25, 1994

"Compassionate, risk-taking reporting: timely and valuable."
From frequent Atlantic contributor Langewiesche—a former pilot who worked the Texas-Mexico border—a terse, clear, tough- minded account of life on both sides of the line. Read full book review >
THE LIVES OF MICHEL FOUCAULT by David Macey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 25, 1994

"A cautious and respectful study—avoiding luridness and gossip while preserving its subject's dignity—that Foucault himself might have authorized."
Elusive and private, ``the lives'' of Michel Foucault (1926- 84) include the many public roles that he assumed—as philosopher, academic, historian, political activist, and homosexual—roles that both reflected and helped shape the character of postwar France. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 25, 1994

"An evenhanded appreciation of special forces and their varied roles in a Global Village that, despite the USSR's collapse, falls well short of being a peaceable kingdom. (First serial to Newsweek; Main Selection of the Military Book Club)"
From a Newsweek correspondent who's seen them in action on a number of fronts: an absorbing and informative briefing on the American military's elite but covert forces Drawing mainly on personal observations and interviews with over 200 of the roughly 46,000 soldiers, sailors, and airmen who comprise the US Special Operations Command, Waller focuses on four outfits—the Army's Delta Force and Green Berets, the Navy's SEALs, and the so-called cowboys who fly the Pave Low helicopters that, among other missions impossible, put commando units where they have to be by day or night. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 1994

"A moving tale of family sorrows and secrets—as well as a courageous and candid search for the truth, however painful it might be. (Sixteen pages of b&w photos—not seen)"
A provocative memoir that goes to the heart of our American identity as Haizlip (owner of a public-relations firm), while searching for her mother's family—blacks who passed for whites- -confronts the deeply intertwined but often suppressed tensions between race and skin color. Read full book review >
DOUBLE LIVES by Stephen Koch
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 24, 1994

"30's liberals."
An often fascinating—if sometimes aggravating—history that explores how the Soviet Union tried to shape Western cultural opinion in the 1920's and 1930's. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 20, 1994

"An engrossing memoir—complete with perceptive commentary on colleagues and contemporary notables—from one of the fourth estate's authentic paradigms. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs— not seen)"
A world-class newsman's absorbing, anecdotal account of his experiences as a high-profile foreign correspondent. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

The Unexpected Everything is a YA feel-good story of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >