History Book Reviews (page 94)

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"A poignant and powerful book. (16 b&w photos, not seen)"
A respectful, unsentimental portrait of a village in Mali, and a moving story of a warm friendship between an American Peace Corps volunteer fresh out of college and a young Malian health worker. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"A blistering, important work, updating Paul Chaat Smith and Robert Allan Warrior's Like a Hurricane (1996)."
An excellent book that reopens the wounds of Wounded Knee—and that provides important new information for readers of Peter Matthiessen's long-suppressed In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"Now a millionaire, Giuliani may not have been directly responsible for all those woes, but they happened on his watch. This careful condemnation will raise eyebrows."
"When he assured New York that things would come out all right, he was blessedly believable." That was on 9/11. Things haven't been as good for Rudy Giuliani since. And this book won't make it any better. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 29, 2006

"Another epitaph for Mr. Bush's War, and a book sure to fascinate—and anger—its readers."
Mesopotamia is a capitalist's dreamscape. As one put it, "If the United States was going to the trouble of invading Iraq, shouldn't American companies reap the rewards?" Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 21, 2006

"A challenging read for educators and parents alike."
A former child prodigy explores the pressures on gifted children to excel. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 21, 2006

"Absorbing reading—necessary, even, for anyone posted to a place where our performance 'will determine where a lot of people come down on the clash of civilizations.'"
A tale of good guys and bad guys in the Wild West of Afghanistan—save that "good" and "bad" are strangely fluid notions. Read full book review >
I WAS A CHILD OF HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS by Bernice Eisenstein
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 17, 2006

"Like Art Spiegelman's Maus, with which it is likely to be compared (and hold up well in the bargain), Eisenstein's memoir is an ultimately hopeful act, enshrining ordinary people so that they will not be forgotten, wrinkles and warts and secrets and all."
String Hebrew-language chicken tags together, and you'll discover that the word "kosher" spells "Jew" sideways. So this brilliantly conceived child's-eye view of the Shoah generation reveals—to name just one mystery unraveled. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 15, 2006

"A valuable resource for those needing proof that the government machine could use a good overhaul."
A carefully nonpartisan examination of the events surrounding 9/11 and the government's response—or lack of response—to them. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 10, 2006

"Essential for an understanding of that dreadful day."
A comprehensive and compelling account of the events preceding and causing 9/11, with a tight focus on al-Qaeda and Osama bin Laden and on the men who were pursuing him before the attacks. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 8, 2006

"A moving account of individual experiences, indispensable to anyone seeking to understand the precarious national psyche of the world's most populous nation."
Among the first Americans to study in China following the communist victory in 1949, Washington Post reporter Pomfret looks back at his student days at Nanjing University in 1981 and the lives of his classmates, survivors of one of the most tumultuous periods in the country's history. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 8, 2006

"A compelling portrait of a conflicted feminist."
Finely detailed biography of a woman whose ascension as a cult figure writing as a man was the most visible facet of her fascinating and, in the end, tragic life. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 7, 2006

"Readers who admire Davis's work and that of the late Marc Reisner will find this fine entry in the library of apocalyptic Californiana of urgent interest."
Another compelling reason not to breathe in L.A. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >