History Book Reviews (page 94)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 2, 2003

"A welcome contribution, full of untold stories, to the literature of WWII."
A fine tale of great and not-so-great escapes, along with the ordinary business of surviving confinement in Hitler's stalags in the final months of WWII. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 2003

"An excellent addition to the literature of the Vietnam War, instructive and moving—but also likely to reopen old wounds."
They wore many uniforms but shared the same hell: a wide-ranging collection of oral histories, à la Studs Terkel, drawn from veterans of the Vietnam War. Read full book review >

AS OF THIS WRITING by Clive James
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2003

"Criticism is not indispensable to art,' James writes. 'It is indispensable to civilization—a more inclusive thing.' His stimulating and thrilling work forcefully makes a case for that bold declaration."
Superb collection of criticism at once deeply serious and deliberately accessible, more than justifying its author's claim that "readability is intelligence." Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 6, 2003

"Fine entertainment for adventure buffs, solidly researched and fluently told."
An action-packed recounting of one of the most famous incidents in the history of exploration. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 2003

"Should spark discussion among WWII historians and great interest among military-history buffs."
Superb, highly accessible revisionist study of Germany's swift defeat of France in 1940 and its wide-ranging implications, then and now. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2003

"Fine slice of American military and revolutionary history—good for commodores in the making, too."
Sturdy, seaworthy life of the Scottish-born hero of the American Revolution, whom John Adams characterized as "the most ambitious and intriguing officer in the American Navy." Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2003

"As indeed, anyone reading Hutton's useful, sobering study is likely to conclude: we do."
Who's more dangerous to world peace: Saddam or a golf-playing, pension fund-robbing, churchgoing Republican? Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 2003

"A leisurely walk through a former inferno with a most eloquent Virgil."
Celebrated Civil War historian McPherson (Fields of Fury, 2002, etc.) holds our hands, points our heads, and evokes awe-ful and sanguinary images of July 1863 in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Read full book review >
DEATH AS A WAY OF LIFE by David Grossman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2003

"Chillingly, sometimes agonizingly, eloquent on hope's fading light."
Can Israel and Palestine ever make peace? Israeli novelist Grossman (Be My Knife, 2002, etc.) addresses this question from the perspective of a Jerusalem journalist who is also a husband, father, and peace activist bitterly frustrated by the leaders of both sides. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 2003

"Sharp perspectives, adroit observations, vivid historical consciousness. (17 illustrations)"
An irresistible tour of 18th-century oddities and overviews. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 15, 2003

"An invaluable contribution to the history of an unspeakably brutal century."
Newcomer Ansky takes us on a harrowing tour of blood-soaked ground: the Russian-Polish borderlands during the worst years of WWI. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 15, 2003

"Indispensable for understanding the role of secret intelligence in foreign policy and national defense."
Of spooks, spies, double agents, and Ivy League gentlemen who certainly did read each other's mail: former CIA director Helms revisits a long career doing Uncle Sam's shadow work. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >