History Book Reviews (page 94)

HISTORY
Released: May 4, 2004

"A superb contribution to the literature of WWII."
Or, Rosie the Riveter reconsidered. Read full book review >
THE REFORMATION by Diarmaid MacCulloch
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 2004

"An essential work of religious history."
A monumental study of the clash between late medieval Christianity and early modern Protestantism, both "religions of fear, anxiety, and guilt." Read full book review >

BLOOD DONE SIGN MY NAME by Timothy B. Tyson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2004

"One of the most candid and lucent books on race in this or any other year."
Powerful, wrenching story of a racial killing during the author's North Carolina childhood. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2004

"Choice political journalism."
Observant, quicksilver explorations of the Big Apple's political landscape. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2004

"Impressive reportage, a fearless commitment to seeing what there is to see, and a strong sense of history: a fine work of literary travel, one that honors its subjects."
A travel writer's anabasis through a country that is no country. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 27, 2004

"Why spies don't make good assassins, why American intelligence needs to borrow a page from the Great Game heroes of the 19th-century British Empire, why things go wrong: it's all here. A perfect companion for fans of John le Carré."
A slender but rich—and quite entertaining—introduction to the shadowy world of spy vs. spy. Read full book review >
ALEXANDER HAMILTON by Ron Chernow
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 26, 2004

"Literate and full of engaging historical asides. By far the best of the many lives of Hamilton now in print, and a model of the biographer's art."
A splendid life of an enlightened reactionary and forgotten Founding Father. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 23, 2004

"Of a piece with Daniel Bergner's In the Land of Magic Soldiers (2003): a sobering and much-needed portrait of a land that merits, and requires, our attention."
History blended with firsthand reportage of postcolonial Africa, "the stage of mankind's greatest tragedies." Read full book review >
STALIN by S. Sebag Montefiore
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 18, 2004

"There is much news here (including the fate of Hitler's bones), and much to ponder. Altogether extraordinary, and required reading for anyone interested in world affairs."
A fascinating, superbly written study of the Red Emperor Josef Stalin, "an energetic and vainglorious melodramatist who was exceptional in every way." Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 6, 2004

"The straight stuff: sobering, eye-opening, and not all that sanguine."
A Texas journalist assembles and dissects the facts surrounding the 1998 death of David "Gypsy" Chain, an activist killed in California's Humboldt County Redwood forest when a logger felled a tree nearby. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 2, 2004

"A first-rate history, freshly told, with every promise of becoming a standard text."
American history as epic: the first volume of a projected trilogy by a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 2, 2004

"A horrendous story told with bitter skill, highlighting the whole sordid, greedy mess that attends illegal broader crossings."
The rueful, fate-wracked tale of 26 men who tried to cross into the US from Mexico but chose the wrong time, place, and guide. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >