History Book Reviews (page 942)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 14, 1994

"A detailed but condescending and rather dull portrait, with few insights, of a problematic time in Iran's history."
Eight conversations between the author and Mohammad Reza—Shah of Iran until 1979— as well as a record of life in an Iranian prison under the Ayatollah's regime. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 14, 1994

"Tightly focused and painstakingly detailed, as well as deeply sympathetic: the definitive history of the Cherokees in their desperate last stand against white encroachment."
An expert chronicle of the final triumphs and troubles of the Cherokee Nation before its integrity was destroyed by the US Congress in the 1880's—and the crowning achievement in the distinguished career of the late McLoughlin (History and Religion/Brown). Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 12, 1994

"Exciting and fair-minded: the definitive account of a dark hour in American history. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
A comprehensive, meticulously researched history of the 1877 war between the Nez Perce and the US government. Read full book review >
SHAKESPEARE, IN FACT by Irvin Leigh Matus
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 10, 1994

"A well-defined and fascinating populist argument that makes Shakespeare accessible as a hard-working and clever man of the theater. (Seventy-five illustrations)"
Although more than 300 books have disputed the authorship of poems and plays most often attributed to Shakespeare, Matus (the scholarly Shakespeare, 1991—not reviewed) now offers what he believes should be the final one, presenting an irrefutable Shakespeare who was himself and not the 56 others—scholars, royals, obscure geniuses—put forth in his stead. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 5, 1994

"The common thread binding these chapters may be tenuous, but Weatherford is a hugely entertaining, well-traveled writer—one who makes a strong case for a hands-off, learn-from-them approach toward these last ancient ways of life."
A gallimaufry of cultural arcana from indefatigable anthropologist Weatherford (Native Roots, 1991; Indian Givers, 1988). Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 3, 1994

"A skillful, dramatic, unsentimental blend of introspection and action."
A most eloquent Holocaust memoir, distinguished by symmetry of storyline and theme. Read full book review >
TENNYSON by Michael Thorn
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 3, 1994

"Read the Levi instead."
Compared with Peter Levi's learned, insightful Tennyson (p. 1370), Thorn's life of the poet is journalistic—a series of short, anecdotal chapters devoted to tableaux or gossip—and is, despite its fast pace, out of tune with the character and achievement of his subject. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"A masterful appreciation of the tangled webs woven in the cause of power politics during the early years of the cold war. (Forty-two maps and 42 illustrations—not seen)"
An informed and revelatory reappraisal of Sino-Soviet relations from the close of WW II through October 1950, when the People's Republic of China entered the Korean conflict. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"More a monograph than a fully realized history but, still, a well-documented revisionist rebuke to those who would isolate Nazism as a unique phenomenon."
Narrowly focused yet chillingly effective indictment of the American scientists and social theorists who inspired and applauded Nazi racist ideology. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Certain to grip the imagination and emotions (and to be published in both English and Spanish language editions). (First printing of 150,000; first serial rights to Vanity Fair; TV rights to Hearst Entertainment)"
If Orestes Lorenzo didn't exist, Hollywood might have had to invent him—if it dared. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"A powerful record of seven American wars, told in the words of those who lived through them. (First printing of 15,000)"
In a look at a dimension of war that historians rarely cover- -the life of the ordinary soldier—Missouri Review ed. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >