History Book Reviews (page 942)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"The authors may not always be quite as skeptical of statistics as one would like, but this is a hard-headed, clear analysis filled with anecdote and vivid reportage."
A vivid and thoughtful portrait of China by a Pulitzer Prize- winning husband-and-wife team of New York Times correspondents formerly in Beijing. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Clark's observations of British political life are acute and his gossip hilarious."
The diaries of Clark, who held cabinet positions under British prime ministers Thatcher and Major from 1986 to 1992, have already caused something of a sensation in the UK. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

Hofstadter's (Temperaments, 1992) account of being on the trail of fraud in the international antiquities trade is as full of intrigue, shady characters, and exotic hotel lobbies as the latest spy thriller. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Despite some narrative discord arising from the uneasy mix of broad cultural generalizations and minute historical details, a valuable contribution to our understanding of the durability and vulnerability of ideas about gender in the 19th century."
Although at times unevenly woven, this account of three women's struggles to serve the Union adds new texture to the well- worn Civil War metaphor ``a house divided.'' Drawing on their letters and journals as well as formal historical sources, Leonard (History/Colby College) chronicles the lives of three women who battled gender stereotypes in order to participate in the war effort: Sophronia Bucklin, a volunteer nurse; Annie Wittenmyer, a soldiers' aid activist; and Mary Edwards Walker, a licensed physician. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"A welcome volume about a Rabelaisian monster of a man and a poet, made timelier by the recent publication of Elizabeth Bishop's letters. (photos, not seen)"
A generously sympathetic and artistically astute account of one poet by another, the author also of a biography of John Berryman (Dreamsong, 1990). Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"The book could use more edge, both in its prose and its attitude toward experts, but it should aid anybody engaged with this vital issue. (Author tour)"
A thoughtful, evenhanded, and accessible mix of reporting and analysis concerning population control, by the diplomatic correspondent of the Christian Science Monitor. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"For all its interdisciplinary breadth and originality, this reads like a beery breeze-shooting session with a college prof. (16 pages of b&w drawings, maps, not seen) (Author tour)"
In the latest leg of an idiosyncratic intellectual journey, Pellegrino looks at the stories of the Old Testament through the lenses of genetics, paleontology, and archaeology. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"This is a shame, for there is undoubtedly an interesting backstage story here—but one that needs a light, acerbic touch to bring it to life."
The story of the tortuous negotiations between the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the two Koreas over the staging of the 1988 summer Olympics in Seoul takes the reader into the heart of Cold War politics in all its paranoid splendor. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Schell doesn't give as immediate a sense of life in China as do Kristof and WuDunn in China Wakes (p. 826), nor has he travelled as widely, but he brings great analytical power and understanding to one of the most important political stories of our time. (Author tour)"
The latest in a splendid series by Schell (Discos and Democracy, 1988, etc.), extending over 20 years and tracking momentous changes in the world's most populous country. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Passionate, exhaustively researched, and original. (Photos and maps, not seen)"
An expansive history of Western civilization's evolving conception of the human body and that concept's influence on the erection of cities. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"A good yarn with an appealing protagonist that inspires sadness for the Peruvian people and much distaste for their government. (8 pages b&w photos)"
A memorable report of a monthlong 1992 expedition to Peru, featuring daring, drugs, and despotism. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Worthy, especially in the classroom, but neither groundbreaking nor definitive. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
An often stimulating survey of how blacks have been portrayed in popular culture. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >