History Book Reviews (page 942)

GEORGE BUSH'S WAR by Jean Edward Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 20, 1992

According to Smith (Political Science/Univ. of Toronto; Lucius D. Clay, 1990, etc.) in this volatile study, America's adventure in the Persian Gulf War was not a crusade for freedom but a checkpoint on the personal agenda of George Bush, who disregarded constitutional restrictions on presidential power and cynically manipulated the public, the press, Congress, and even the military. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 20, 1992

"A curate's egg of a book."
A fitfully enlightening exploration of the political transformation of the former Soviet satellites, by Goldfarb (Political and Social Science/New School for Social Research). Read full book review >

DISMANTLING THE COLD WAR ECONOMY by Ann Markusen
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 19, 1992

"Unlike their well-documented, organized, and compelling analysis, though, their broad prescription lacks confidence-building details."
This worthy successor to Seymour Melman's exposÇs of military dominance of the American economy names the central, driving segment of the military-industrial complex—the ``Aerospace, Communications, Electronics (ACE) Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 19, 1992

"Uneven and often, it seems, unfair, but Rivlin's research and intimate knowledge of the principals are impressive."
A mostly admiring—though contentious, flatly written, and somewhat overlong—political biography of Harold Washington, mayor of Chicago from 1983-87. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 17, 1992

"Skillfully interwoven from personal and local histories and contemporary accounts—an intimate view of desperation and bloodshed on the Great Plains that's as poignant as it is tragic. (Eight pages of illustrations.)"
Another sad chapter in the history of the American West sharply and colorfully rendered by Schultz in a fitting successor to his vivid Month of the Freezing Moon (1990). Read full book review >

COMRADES by Brian Moynahan
HISTORY
Released: March 17, 1992

"A cautionary tale to be remembered as the infant Commonwealth of Independent States tries to remain democratic and economically viable without veering between anarchy and a new, yet unknown dictatorship. (Maps and b&w photographs—not seen.)"
A tightly focused narrative of the year that Russia overthrew the Romanovs only to fall under the yoke of another despotic government. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 16, 1992

A sprawling chronicle that details how a clutch of Ivy- educated Wall Street attorneys and their associates—the ``Old Boy network''—created the Central Intelligence Agency and influenced the formative decades of the cold war. Read full book review >
THE PRESIDENCY OF WOODROW WILSON by Kendrick A. Clements
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 1992

"A finely detailed, almost too specialized, and nonjudgmental account, not very urgent or thought-provoking."
Smoothly written if not penetrating account of how an exceptional chief executive enlarged the presidency in a period of intense national growth and change; by Clements (History/Univ. of South Carolina). Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 12, 1992

"Thorough, richly researched, and written with moral fire. (Photos—not seen.)"
A provocative sociohistorical account of America's underclasses. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 11, 1992

"A significant study."
A penetrative and timely analysis of the postwar history of Communism, by Ulam (Director, Russian Research Center/Harvard; Dangerous Relations, 1983, etc.). Read full book review >
THE MAKING OF MIDDLEBROW CULTURE by Joan Shelley Rubin
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 9, 1992

Rubin (American Studies/SUNY at Brockport) offers a thorough, thoughtful history and critique of ``middlebrow culture'' during the 1920's-40's, profiling Will Durant and other ``apostles of a shattered faith'' who promoted it. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 9, 1992

"An articulate and provocative collection—with something for lovers of western facts and figures, as well as for the more theoretically inclined. (Photographs—not seen.)"
Thirteen wide-ranging essays form an introduction to the cutting edge of western scholarship in this Festschrift to Yale historian Howard Roberts Lamar, who also contributes a chapter. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >