History Book Reviews (page 943)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 6, 1994

"Epic, engrossing, big."
A one-volume edition of Hamilton's (JFK: Reckless Youth, 1992) three-volume biography, which won the Whitbread Award. Read full book review >
6/6/1944 by Gerald Astor
HISTORY
Released: June 6, 1994

"The consistently absorbing text has 24 pages of contemporary photographs. (First printing of 65,000)"
June 6, 1994, marks the 50th anniversary of D-day. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: June 6, 1994

"A brilliant account that blends perfectly the human and the strategic dimensions of this great battle."
A splendid, moving, and authoritative account of the most decisive day of WW II by Ambrose (History/Univ. of New Orleans), whose massive biographies of Eisenhower and Nixon have won widespread praise. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 6, 1994

"Riveting soldier's-eye views of the deadly confusion of battle, and a significant contribution to military and D-day literature."
Relying on correspondence, diaries, and interviews, Miller (The House of Getty, not reviewed) presents vivid first-person perspectives from British, German, and American combatants in the Allied invasion of Normandy. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 6, 1994

"Eloquent testimony for posterity, reminding us that military campaigns, however just, have awful costs."
While the 50th anniversary of D-day is being commemorated in many ways, few will be as affecting as the episodic journal of Marie Osmont, an aristocratic Frenchwoman who endured four comparatively pacific years of German occupation and three hellish months of liberation. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: June 6, 1994

"But his effort is worthy, and his conclusions contain much sense."
This broad-brush essay starts from the premise that ``there can be too much freedom in life, and that too much freedom has a serious moral, social, and emotional price.'' Schwartz (Psychology/Swarthmore) is concerned with the darker side of the seemingly limitless choices of middle-class American life. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 3, 1994

Wit and wisdom for intelligent life forms who have gotten past kindergarten. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1994

"These thoroughly researched and annotated reports add up to a one-volume study of Auschwitz without peer in Holocaust literature."
An immensely wide and deep collection of reports on the infrastructure, operation, population, and history of the Auschwitz death-camp complex. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 1994

"Historical writing that is remarkably accessible as well as incisive."
Another charge through the imperial past as Hopkirk deftly marshals facts, larger-than-life characters, and sweeping battles to demonstrate how close the Germans and their Turkish allies came to bringing down the mighty British Empire. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1994

"An often tart, consistently incisive analysis of how the Allies, through trial, error, and anguish, achieved their winged victory."
A comprehensive survey of the worldwide conflict that defined the role of air power in modern warfare. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1994

"This poignant and provocative book goes beyond its historical setting to get to the heart of why people do or don't identify with ethnic, national, or religious groups."
A dramatic exploration of varying degrees of Jewish identity espoused, concealed, or denied by 15 Holocaust survivors during and after the war. Read full book review >
JUST DO IT by Donald Katz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 1994

"An engrossing and illuminating appreciation of a distinctive corporate culture."
An agreeably fervid take on what makes Nike Inc. a consistent winner in the ultracompetitive sports-and-fitness trade. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >