History Book Reviews (page 943)

MEMOIRS OF A WARSAW GHETTO FIGHTER by Simha Rotem
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"4 pages photos, not seen)."
The candid, fast-moving memoir of a significant member of the Warsaw Ghetto's fighting underground. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

There's a double entendre, likely intended, in the title. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Almost certainly the best book on this subject that we are likely to see."
This account of the Cambridge Spy Ring is so knowledgeable and full of insight that it sweeps the competition from the field. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A more lively tale of early Clintonism than some of the recent overviews."
A nifty case study of the tangled trail—from policy idea to law—of the bill that established the National and Community Service Trust Act of 1993, the program known as AmeriCorps. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"This falls considerably short of its potential as a major study of the tragic destruction of the Amazon and its indigenous people. (24 pages b&w photos, maps, not seen)"
Though chilling, this unfocused narrative fails to illuminate the purported relationship between Nelson Rockefeller, missionaries in South America, and the modern genocide of Amazonian Indians. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Howard says is needed to reform our regulatory system."
Attorney Howard makes an obvious but important point by decrying a system of governmental regulations whose complexity and detail often cause more harm than good; but his solutions are vague and quixotic. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Entertaining and sensitive."
How six resourceful women faced the perils of being married to King Henry VIII and managed to play an active role in the man's world of early 16th century England. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

The American ``occupation'' of Britain during WW II—the phrase is George Orwell's—could have been a disaster but, in the event, was almost a triumph. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Well written and well researched, a distinct contribution to the subject, even if land and legal records do not do justice to the agony of the times."
A good academic history of a small community in Ireland whose inhabitants died or migrated to the US during the famine of 1847- 48. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Minor problems, and a thick theoretical vocabulary aside, Chen's thesis is fundamentally sound, supportable, and intellectually challenging."
An ambitious revisionist challenge to Edward Said's concept of Orientalism. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A fascinating record that casts each of its formidable protagonists in a gentler and more personal light."
An absorbing document of a time, a culture, and a friendship. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 15, 1994

"Heroic polar firsts are a thing of the past, but going over these attempts still makes for an absorbing evening. (Illustrations, not seen)"
A trim, at times hypnotic, history of polar exploration. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >