History Book Reviews (page 943)

OUT OF ORDER by Thomas E. Patterson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 14, 1993

"Provocative prescriptions that draw useful distinctions between good politics and good government. (Charts and tabular material—not seen)"
An arresting and perceptive critique of the media-centric process by which America selects its Presidents. Read full book review >
THE FATE OF MARXISM IN RUSSIA by Alexander Yakovlev
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 13, 1993

"A damning, eloquently made case against Marxism—but one that lacks genuine resonance for want of an accounting of its author's change of mind."
A bitterly comprehensive indictment of Marx and Marxism handed down by a sometime stalwart of the USSR establishment who, however, offers almost no insights on his own conversion from apostle to apostate. Read full book review >

DEN OF LIONS by Terry Anderson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 12, 1993

Tremendously moving account by the AP's former Chief Middle East Correspondent of his 2,454 days as a hostage of the Islamic terrorist organization Hezbollah. Read full book review >
LAND OF IDOLS by Michael Parenti
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 12, 1993

"Eloquently argued and provocative, but those seeking a solid progressive agenda for a post-cold-war America will be disappointed."
Radical social-critic Parenti (Make-Believe Media, The Sword and the Dollar, etc.) returns, isolating and condemning certain ideological underpinnings of modern American life and casting a baleful eye on everything from New Age hype to more familiar racist, sexist, and capitalist targets. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 7, 1993

"Top-drawer. (Eighteen line drawings)"
Travel memoir about the author's four trips to Japan that grows like a novel and takes on unusual richness as it keeps reinvesting itself in earlier scenes and people. Read full book review >

DISRAELI by Stanley Weintraub
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 7, 1993

"But the inner life eludes him—just as it seems to have eluded Disraeli. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
Disraeli (1804-81) was an outsider who cultivated the art of letters as successfully as he practiced the craft of politics. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 7, 1993

"An evocative recollection of a community cruelly defined by race but sustained by loving strength and deep faith."
A lyrical recollection of a segregated Memphis childhood, rich in love and wisdom, that, unfortunately, peters out in typical Sixties-generation preoccupations. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 5, 1993

"While Kahn covers a lot of well-trampled ground here, he does so with an elegant authority that—without false sentiment or excessive nostalgia—puts certain of the diamond game's good old days in clear and compelling perspective. (Photographs—not seen)"
An agreeably digressive and anecdotal trip, with a perceptive guide, down a remarkable span in baseball's memory lane. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 5, 1993

"First Principles'' of modernism—which he celebrates in the conclusion of this powerful and outspoken book. (Ninety illustrations)"
In a personal tour of modern architecture and the colorful, eccentric, clannish men (all men)—mostly displaced Europeans- -responsible for it, Blake (Curator for Architecture and Industrial Design/Museum of Modern Art; Form Follows Fiasco, 1977, etc.—not reviewed) recovers the energy, vision, and dedication that he says characterized the profession in the decades following WW II. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 5, 1993

Actually, on the evidence here, Krassner—founder/editor of The Realist and the most outrageous cultural critic of his era—no longer raves now that he's in his 60s. Read full book review >
THE LAST BROTHER by Joe McGinniss
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Caveat emptor."
Can one sympathize with a rich, powerful, boozing, aging roue of a US senator? Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Although Eisler's analyses of specific cases can be disappointingly superficial, he paints a warm, vivid portrait of Brennan the man and admirably sums up the justice's humane and progressive jurisprudence."
In this brisk, agreeable account, Washingtonian Magazine national editor Eisler (Shark Tank, 1990) pays tribute to the great liberal jurist, recapitulating the judicial achievements of Brennan's long and influential Supreme Court career. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >