History Book Reviews (page 943)

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 16, 1992

"A down-to-earth wrap-up: fine fare for general readers as well as armchair strategists. (Charts, diagrams, line drawings, and maps—not seen.)"
A savvy, slick, and comprehensive overview of the Gulf War, from the authors of A Quick and Dirty Guide to War (1984). Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 16, 1992

"Essential reading for followers of Middle Eastern politics."
A thoughtful analysis of the changing Palestinian concept of identity, rendered with remarkable clarity and balance by Israeli journalist Rubinstein. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 15, 1992

"So it is, but in his modest, plodding way Chalfen sheds a pure and painful light on the education of a great 20th-century poet and the destroyed world that nurtured him."
Germany has made a Rumanian Jew the poet laureate of the Holocaust. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 15, 1992

"A refreshingly candid memoir told with pride but also an often disarming flippancy."
Bytes and bombs, bureaucrats and booze dominate Wiener's lively account of the six months he spent as the CNN executive producer in Saddam Hussein's Baghdad. Read full book review >
THE RADICALISM OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION by Gordon S. Wood
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 14, 1992

"A provocative, highly accomplished examination of how American society was reshaped in the cauldron of revolution."
Perhaps, as is often noted, the American Revolution was not as convulsive or transforming as its French and Russian counterparts. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 13, 1992

"In his diverting manner, Cwiklik strips away the mythology of American democracy to paint an amusing but disturbing picture of what really goes on atop Capitol Hill."
Bismarck once said that the public should never see how sausages or laws are made. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 10, 1992

"A startling look, then, at a country quite different from, and hauntingly similar to, the US. (Forty photographs—not seen.)"
A desanitized view of Australia from a veteran Australian journalist, ranging from its founding as a penal colony in 1788 to the machinations of the ``Old Mates,'' the powerful ``dullards'' who threaten the nation's hard-won status as a working-class society of equals. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 10, 1992

"Remarkable mainly for its consistently graceless style, the text includes over 30 pages of photographs—not seen."
A truncated history of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, which reads more like jottings from a house organ than a presumably objective journalist's reportage on a consequential outpost of laissez-faire capitalism. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 10, 1992

"Persuasive and provocative, and a fitting contribution to the commemoration of the Columbus legacy. (Eight b&w photos; three drawings.)"
A fresh and thorough review of the role of prophets and religion in Native American relations with Europeans and Americans during a critical period of contact. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 9, 1992

"Lacking the power and focus of Robinson's earlier work, this serves as little more than reference material for die-hard Crusade fans. (Maps.)"
The author of Born in Blood: The Lost Secrets of Freemasonry (1989)—which provocatively argued that the Freemasons are a descendant order of the medieval Knights Templar—now concentrates, in a highly detailed but far less captivating addendum, on the Knights' role in the Crusades. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 6, 1992

"As much an elegiac memory book of old Jewish Boston as a searing indictment against her killers."
A metaphor for America's urban tragedy as told in the dramatic story of old Jewish Boston's swift and cruel demise. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"Splendid, stirring stuff."
Another of those strange fiction/nonfiction hybrids that only science fiction seems to generate. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >