History Book Reviews (page 943)

PRAYING FOR SHEETROCK by Melissa Fay Greene
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 3, 1991

"Perhaps too discursive for some, with scenes of evocation before and after every piece of action; still, a beautifully written and absolutely authentic picture of the rural South."
In 1971, McIntosh County, N.C., was a tiny hamlet of 1800 souls—half of them black—that the civil-rights movement, played out in cities, had passed by: a hard-scrabble setting for Greene's powerful book debut. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Daring in its reliance on reason and cooperation as an antidote to the usual hysteria."
Nicely balanced, thoughtful blueprint for defusing a volatile component of the Middle East powder keg, from the unique perspective of a collaboration between Israeli and Palestinian scholars. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Tantalizing in its view of Wolff and his world, especially the pre-Weimar period—and a sad commentary on how little publishers today heed his excellent example."
A biographical sketch of Wolff—founder of Pantheon Books—by his wife Helen, brief essays and anecdotes he produced for German radio in the early 1960's, and a smattering of correspondence—all ably edited by Ermarth (History/Dartmouth). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"An engrossing biography that pays full tribute to Jefferson's personal genius and political achievements. (B&w illustrations—not seen.)"
Following his earlier Thomas Jefferson: A Strange Case of Mistaken Identity (1989—not reviewed), Old Dominion professor Mapp offers a graceful, admiring assessment of the great democrat as President and as the aged but still intellectually vital ``Sage of Monticello.'' As President, Jefferson eased people's fears about the radical tendencies of his Democratic-Republican Party by ``taking things by the smooth handle.'' Mapp takes sharp issue with such Jefferson critics as Henry Adams and Theodore Roosevelt, who depicted the Virginian as both a hypocrite who violated his ``strict constructionist'' principles while in office and as a pacifist who left the nation woefully unprepared for the War of 1812. Read full book review >
COMANDOS by Sam Dillon
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"A fascinating tale—laced with corruption and brutality and full of sharp, revealing facts—that's heavy on the dialogue but very readable."
A much-needed look at the contras, seen from within by Dillon, anchor of the Miami Herald's Pulitzer-winning Iran-contra team. Read full book review >

MICHEL FOUCAULT by Didier Eribon
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Superbly written and carefully documented: Eribon has managed to provide a scholarly exegesis of Foucault that will also serve as a good introduction for the lay reader."
A meticulous and authoritative biography of the influential French philosopher and historian, by an editor at Le Nouvel Observateur who was closely acquainted with Foucault during his later years. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Short on background material and chronology, but Fischer's impressionistic, anecdotal style will engage military-history fans. (Sixteen-page b&w insert—not seen.)"
Here, Fischer (American Studies/Notre Dame; Notre Dame Remembered, 1986) writes vividly of the ``Green Hell'' of southeast Asia after Japan struck in WW II. Read full book review >
GABBY by Francis Gabreski
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"These cavils apart, an often ingratiating memoir. (Sixteen pages of photographs—not seen.)"
The low-key memoir of an American fighter pilot who achieved ace status in two wars. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"An authoritative study of the nature of the American patriotic spirit as observed in its most hallowed memorials. (One-hundred- and-eighteen illustrations.)"
Here, Linenthal (Religious Studies/Univ. of Wisconsin) provocatively chronicles the history and role of five of America's most famous battle-site memorials: Lexington-Concord, the Alamo, Gettysburg, the Little Big Horn, and Pearl Harbor. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Unrelenting and powerful: a notable addition to the crowded field of Holocaust studies. (Eight page photo insert—not seen.)"
A stirring tale of survival against overwhelming odds, based on oral and written testimony and recounted with novelistic intensity by documentary filmmaker Marshall. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"David was allegedly allowed to watch Austin and Mabel making love on Sunday evenings), and his neglect of precise citations, referring to other biographers without naming them or the works he claims to be refuting."
Walsh, novelist (The Man Who Buried Jesus, 1989) and literary detective (Into My Own: The English Years of Robert Frost, 1988, etc.), now brings his impressive speculative powers to bear on the scandals surrounding the closing years of Emily Dickinson's life. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Quietly subversive but wonderfully accurate—a comprehensive, memorable tribute to the pervasive Native American influence on those who destroyed a way of life even as they assimilated it."
Another insightful and provocative contribution by anthropologist Weatherford (Indian Givers, 1989, etc.) to increasing national recognition of the extent of white America's debt to Native Americans. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >