History Book Reviews (page 944)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1994

"Certain to be controversial, Kilzer's is an absorbing and cogently argued original contribution to WW II literature."
An audacious rereading of the diplomatic history of WW II by a Pulitzer Prize-winning Minneapolis Star-Tribune investigative reporter. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 1994

"A concise, passionately argued essay, sparked by Shlaim's dry wit and scathing sarcasm."
Shlaim (Collusion Across Jordan, 1988), a leading historian of the Israeli revisionist school, offers a brief but suggestive overview of the US role in the Middle East. Read full book review >

UNAMERICAN ACTIVITIES by Sally Belfrage
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1994

"A spirited but myopic account of an adolescence that was both anomalous and all too American."
A roller coaster memory ride through the McCarthy era. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1994

"A cracking account of one hazardous march, in the classic stiff-lipped style. (Author tour)"
``The world's greatest explorer'' bruises his way across Antarctica on foot, and without any external support, thank you very much. Read full book review >
QUEEN ELIZABETH II by Nicholas Davies
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1994

"Despite a serious final chapter offering prescriptions for reforming the monarchy, the hallmarks of this lightweight biography are wealth, power, sex, scandal, happiness that never lasts, and unnamed sources."
A massive, entertaining, and thoroughly unsophisticated look at the life of a woman the author believes is likely to be one of Britain's last monarchs. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 1994

"More such analysis of larger issues would have been welcome, but the book's strength is in the details."
A historian who taught for 12 years in Mississippi presents a thorough and sensitive study of the struggle for civil rights in what was at the time the nation's most racially repressive state. Read full book review >
DAUGHTERS by Gerald Early
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1994

"Interesting but rarely illuminating."
Early's mushy, self-conscious essays recounting discussions with his daughters, poems to them, and diary excerpts have the appeal of a stranger's family album. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1994

"Freeling here demonstrates that good reading and criticism, like good writing, require the skills of a crime writer, and he has clearly mastered all of them."
``Nearly all good writers are `crime writers,' '' contends Freeling, author of 31 crime novels of his own (Flanders Sky, 1992, etc.), in this collection of essays and aperáus on the writers and writings that most interest and influence him. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1994

"It doesn't analyze anything, but for all that, it's a pretty gripping account of dirty war."
A gung-ho account of 27 years in Special Forces. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1994

"The resonant text is enriched by 90 splendid photos."
Goldstein's wide-angle observance of D-day's 50th anniversary is notable for the effective ways in which it spotlights events on the home front as well as in Normandy and links the past to the present. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1994

"With all its faults, full-blooded rhetoric pouring from the text as it thunders along makes this a wonderful relief from the usual dryness of contemporary historians."
A curious and ambitious book that sets out to map the beginnings of colonial America, from the founding of Virginia, Quebec, and Massachusetts to the Anglo-French war of the mid-17th century. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1994

"A grim portrait of brutality, fanaticism, and the cheapness of human life in wartime, etched by people whose voices have been faithfully rendered."
A harrowing compilation of accounts from survivors of Japanese POW camps in the eastern Pacific. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >