History Book Reviews (page 944)

HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Quietly subversive but wonderfully accurate—a comprehensive, memorable tribute to the pervasive Native American influence on those who destroyed a way of life even as they assimilated it."
Another insightful and provocative contribution by anthropologist Weatherford (Indian Givers, 1989, etc.) to increasing national recognition of the extent of white America's debt to Native Americans. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Intriguing for its insider's view of Stalinist bureaucratic hell, but overloaded with the author's implausible self-glory and tedious indignation. (Eight b&w illustrations.)"
Informative but self-absorbed memoir written over 50 years ago by a prominent engineer who went to Russia with a dream of building the workers' paradise and left disgusted by bureaucracy, terrorism, and corruption. Read full book review >

ON BEING WOUNDED by Jr. Wood
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Reminiscent of Ron Kovic's Born on the Fourth of July: a fierce, loving, brooding, sometimes awkward book that deals with difficult, unpopular themes head-on."
Taut memoir focusing on Wood's ``lifelong search for a life outside of killing grounds.'' Eddie Wood was everything it takes to make a serious soldier- -18, good with a gun, with a big, tough hard-drinking hero-daddy and a southern lineage going back a century, during which every generation of men bore arms. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Unconvincing infotainment. (Sixteen pages of photographsnot seen.)"
More B-movie journalism from the prolific Thomas (Journey into Madness, Desire and Denial, etc.), who turns a potentially important story on the Chinese democracy movement into serial melodrama. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

From LBJ's domestic adviser, a memoir that shows the President ``with the bark off''cagey, crude, demanding, and, finally, Shakespearean in his pitiful descent from power. Read full book review >

IN THE REALM OF A DYING EMPEROR by Norma Field
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

A provocative, multileveled ``meditation'' on Emperor Hirohito's 1989 death, raising dark questions about Japan's war guilt in the context of its triumphant prosperity today. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"At this point, Hayman—with reservations—cuts the brightest figure, with Plath chewing more scenery than even Alexander can muster. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Second biography of Sylvia Plath this season, this one by the editor of Ariel Ascending (1984), a collection of essays on Plath's life and work. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Peripatetic true confessions that hook the reader with their very ingenuousness—a genuine American tale."
Ellis, a free-lance writer who is part Cherokee Indian, journeys on foot from Oklahoma to his hometown of Fort Payne, Alabama—symbolically retracing the 900-mile path his ancestors took on their forced odyssey out of the southern states in 1838. Read full book review >
NORWAY 1940 by François Kersaudy
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"An ironic, biting account of an episode as deplorable for its deceit as for its incompetence. (Sixteen pages of photographs—not seen.)"
A lively look at one of the sideshows of WW II—the Nazi invasion of Norway as Britain stood by—from Kersaudy (History/Sorbonne and Oxford). Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"1 million Hiroshimas'' of 1983. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Potent tale of the remarkable events leading to the end of the cold war by Washington Post diplomatic correspondent Oberdorfer (Tet!, 1971). Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Elegant, illuminating, and of significant interest in this decade of need and limits."
Why do Americans collectively devote 20 billion hours of their time each year to helping others? Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Film rights sold."
Spellbinding autobiography of a child prodigy—gifted in the black arts of weaponry—who enters the shadow world of international-arms sales. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >