History Book Reviews (page 944)

HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1994

"In his hands, the irreconcilable differences of the Anglo-Irish tradition and character become creative oppositions."
Drawing on politics, literature, popular culture, and his personal observations, Foster (History/Oxford, Modern Ireland, 1600-1971, 1989), the leading authority on modern Irish history, reveals in this gathering of 14 essays (most previously published in academic journals) the intricacies, ambivalences, and illusions behind the Anglo-Irish identity crisis, especially from 18401922. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 1994

"Reliance on dialogue-rich scenes sometimes sacrifices depth for drama, but this is a memorable and disturbing reminder of much unfinished urban business."
Two veteran Washington journalists offer a vigorous and resonant portrait of the 30-year decline and polarization of our capital. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1994

"A fascinating glimpse inside the sometimes arcane and always political workings of the US Supreme Court and one of its influential members."
An exhaustive and informative biography of a previously neglected Supreme Court justice, written by one his former clerks. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1994

"A notable achievement."
From a British specialist in Asian affairs, this is comprehensive, fact-choked history of the Engish East India Company, which went to India to trade and founded an empire—the British Raj. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1994

"She does this entertainingly and with a minimum of dry analysis."
Levathes, a former staff writer for National Geographic, tells the tale of Chinese emperor Zhu Di and his favorite eunuch admiral, Zheng He, who tried during a 30-year period to break China's isolation with seven major naval expeditions to India, Indonesia, and Africa. Read full book review >

NUREMBERG by Joseph Persico
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1994

"Persico writes well, despite occasionally drifting into melodrama, and the subject exerts its own fascination."
Most books about the Nuremberg trials have focused on the jurisprudential aspects of this unprecedented event. Read full book review >
LINCOLN IN AMERICAN MEMORY by Merrill D. Peterson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1994

"On the other hand, thinking readers will find it refreshing to reach their own judgments of the Lincoln treatments chronicled in a mostly fine piece of historiography."
Peterson (History/Univ. of Virginia; The Jefferson Image in the American Mind, not reviewed) uses the life and legend of Abraham Lincoln to show the general reader how ``history'' is made. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 1994

"A good read that sheds light not just on US ties with a particular country, but on the personal and even idiosyncratic ways in which US foreign policy is sometimes made."
CBS correspondent Dan Raviv and Israeli journalist Yossi Melman (Every Spy a Prince, 1990) explore the special but often troubled relationship between Israel and the US. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1994

"Much better at deconstruction than solutions, but an accessible catalogue for those questioning the new status quo."
A progressive journalist offers a tonic, conversational critique of the Clinton era. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1994

"The bottom line: a linear take on an oldish rogues-to-riches tale, conspicuously deficient in the resonance that could have made it worth retelling."
A lackluster retelling of a celebrated stock-rigging case and its aftershocks, which rippled through Los Angeles for the better (or worse) part of a decade, from the author of Baseball's Great Experiment (1983). Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1994

"High marks for being both instructive and entertaining."
A demanding but rewarding report that illuminates what neurology can now tell us about the human brain. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1994

"A novel contribution to the massive corpus of literature on American slavery—one that shows slaves as skilled artisans leading lives of considerable dignity and achievement, who despite their accomplishments under the slave regime never stopped yearning for freedom."
Dew (American Studies/Williams) uses the meticulously kept records of Virginia slaveholders to create an engrossing, often surprising record of everyday life on an estate in the antebellum South. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >