History Book Reviews (page 944)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Required reading for anyone seeking a valid perspective on America's military over the past three decades. (Eight-page photo insert—not seen)"
A well-done oral history from Santoli (Everything We Had, 1981), showing why our military was much more effective in the Persian Gulf than in Vietnam. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

Scholarly, understated, massive history of the Crown Colony, from Britisher and former international banker Welsh. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A top-level insider's dramatic, stranger-than-fiction disclosures in the great game of espionage. (Maps and photographs- -not seen)"
The suspenseful, eye-opening memoir of a Soviet spy who came in from the cold. Read full book review >
THE RUSH LIMBAUGH STORY by Paul D. Colford
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Eight pages of photographs—not seen)."
Lightweight bio of Rush Hudson Limbaugh III, the heartland eminence whose glib wit and rough charms have made him a heavyweight champion of tory causes. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Not for the casual reader, but a gold mine for history students and those interested in the Puritan origins of the US."
The impact of the Bible on England's experiment as a republic, charted expertly by one of the leading historians of the period. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Well-researched local history on a still timely issue: the effect of class and ethnicity on criminal justice. (Seven b&w illustrations)"
An intriguing account of a New England rush to judgment in the Jacksonian Era. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A potent blend of high adventure and moral polemic, and yet further testimony to the ongoing tragedy of Shangri-La."
The sky burial is the ancient Tibetan ceremony in which a corpse, hacked to pieces, is left on a mountainside to be eaten by vultures. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Heated, hypnotic, bizarre: Mesoamerican history as if composed by an Aztec priest. (One halftone, one map)"
French avant-garde novelist Le ClÇzio (The Giants, 1975, etc.) offers up a meditation and lamentation on Mesoamerican civilizations and the Spanish conquest. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A clever, disciplined, and resourceful reading of the commonplace: a pioneering study that, though somewhat academic, will no doubt influence more popular studies. (Eight halftones, eight line drawings)"
To this original and erudite study, Lott (American Studies/University of Virginia) brings a mass of obscure information and a multidisciplinary approach, interpreting the meaning of black-face minstrelsy to the white working classes who invented and performed it. Read full book review >
BERTRAND RUSSELL by Caroline Moorehead
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Moorehead shapes Russell's complex character into a vivid and compelling portrait: an exemplary accomplishment. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs)"
Ambitious biography by Moorehead (ed., Betrayal, 1990, etc.) of one of the most fascinating of modern British lives, taking in a century of social and cultural upheaval. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A challenging perspective on one of America's cherished heroes, depicting Lincoln as a consummate politician, more determined than scrupulous, without diminishing the magnitude of his achievements. (One hundred illustrations)"
Smoothly written and solidly researched biography by Pulitzer- winning historian Neely (Saint Louis University; The Fate of Liberty, 1991, etc.—not reviewed) that focuses particularly on the moral dilemmas and accomplishments of Lincoln during his presidency and years in public office. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Superficial, vituperative treatment of a complex subject."
A harsh and unconvincing look at FDR's foreign policy. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >