History Book Reviews (page 944)

HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"But his insights into the racial wounds that refuse to close are searing, and urgently need to be addressed."
``Our nation is moving toward two societies, one black, one white, separate and unequal,'' concluded the Kerner Commission on civil disorders in 1968. Read full book review >
SLOW FIRE by Susan Neiman
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"Finally, her Berlin 80's, materially shabby, spiritually rich, make us wish—as she intends- -that we'd spent the decade differently over here."
Vergangenheitsverarbeitung is one of those post-WW II German coinages that admit defeat by their very existence. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1992

"A fascinating portrait of a double agent whose active disaffection with the communist system helped consign it to history's dustbin. (Eight pages of photos—not seen.)"
While Oleg V. Penkovsky may not, literally, have saved the world, this tellingly detailed saga reconfirms that the turncoat GRU colonel provided the West with priceless intelligence during the early 1960's, when the cold war very nearly turned hot. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"Western history is more ignored by historians and the general public'') that shoots itself in the foot through excessive zeal—a charge, ironically, often hurled against the original Reformers. (Fifteen b&w illustrations- -not seen.)"
Ozment (History/Harvard), a specialist in the Reformation (Three Behaim Boys, 1990, The Age of Reform, 1980), digs into the trenches with this popular history of Luther's revolution that doubles as neo-Protestant polemic. Read full book review >
PATRICK'S CORNER by Sean Patrick
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"A nostalgic tribute from the baby of a family—life-affirming, if disappointingly prosaic."
Patrick, a Catholic Digest columnist, offers sentimental reminiscences of growing up Irish and poor in post-WW II America—a tale of shamrocks and hastily muttered Gaelic prayers that never moves beneath the surface. ``Patrick's Corner'' is what Sean and his five older brothers called the intersection in Cleveland where each in turn sold newspapers and performed ten-cent shoeshines for pocket money and to help their widowed mother keep a roof over their heads. Read full book review >

THE SIX WIVES OF HENRY VIII by Alison Weir
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1992

Weir (the genealogical Britain's Royal Family—not reviewed) here uses the many public records and personal letters of the early 1500's to offer a comprehensive, factual version of the tempestuous private and public lives of Henry VIII and his six wives. Read full book review >
BLACK EAGLE CHILD by Ray A. Young Bear
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1992

"A unique account and a milestone in Native American literature. (Photos—not seen.)"
Fascinating and accomplished memoirs in which a Mesquakie poet blends myth, fact, and the unvarnished recollections of a young Native American. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"At a time when revisionists are running ads in college newspapers claiming the Holocaust is a hoax, this affecting memoir should go into every high-school and college library."
Kalib was born in 1931, the beloved youngest child of a wealthy, large, and close-knit family in Bodzentyn, a town of 4000, including 1400 Jews, near Cracow, Poland. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"Intelligent, eminently readable sociopolitical history."
A concise and clear treatment of the diverse issues and social changes that precipitated the Civil War. Read full book review >
THE EAGLE BIRD by Charles F. Wilkinson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1992

"Engaging if not particularly well-integrated, Wilkinson's essays exemplify the land-based ethical systems now developing among progressive western thinkers and honorably maintain the nature-upholding tradition of John Muir and Aldo Leopold."
In 12 pithy essays, an environmental lawyer debunks romantic myths of ranchers, miners, and foresters as ``heroes of the West,'' and denounces ``extreme laissez-faire'' government policies that have allowed these ``heroes'' to devastate the land, water, and air for their private profit. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"Essential for the war scholar's bookshelf; for the generalist, a profoundly moving human document. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Brilliantly realized study of the infamous Vietnam War atrocity in which US soldiers burned a Vietnamese village to the ground, shot the livestock, raped the women, and drove 400 men, women, and children into a ditch to slaughter them with machine- gun fire. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1992

"Herken's clear, well-documented writing and his close attention to the human element make for a fascinating and wisely cautionary study."
Engrossing and enlightening account of the checkered relationship between the scientific community and federal government from the Manhattan Project to SDI, by Herken (The Winning Weapon, 1980). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >