LENIN ON THE TRAIN by Catherine Merridale
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 28, 2017

"A superbly written narrative history that draws together and makes sense of scattered data, anecdotes, and minor episodes, affording us a bigger picture of events that we now understand to be transformative."
British historian Merridale (Red Fortress: History and Illusion in the Kremlin, 2013, etc.) fills a lacuna in the canonical record of Soviet communism. Read full book review >
RICHARD NIXON by John A. Farrell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 28, 2017

"Full of fresh, endlessly revealing insights into Nixon's political career, less on the matter of his character, refreshingly, than on the events that accompanied and resulted from it."
A sturdy study of the man ranked at the bottom of many historians' lists of presidents. Read full book review >

EVERYBODY HAD AN OCEAN by William McKeen
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 2017

"Excellent social history, bracketing David Talbot's Season of the Witch (2012) as an indispensable account of a time of beauty and terror."
Searching account of 1960s Southern California, when the wistful innocence of the Beach Boys died alongside the victims of Charles Manson. Read full book review >
RAPTOR by James Macdonald Lockhart
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 3, 2017

"This illuminating book serves as homage to a brilliant naturalist and extraordinary birds. If you loved H Is for Hawk, put this next on your reading list."
Fifteen birds of prey lead the author on an enthralling journey across the British Isles. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 4, 2017

"A superb, densely detailed complement to William Vollmann's poetic/fictional treatment The Dying Grass (2015), of compelling interest to any student of 19th-century American history."
A chronicle of the white conquest of the inland Northwest at the expense of native peoples defeated in a war that even the newcomers recognized to be unjust. Read full book review >

PROTESTANTS by Alec Ryrie
HISTORY
Released: April 4, 2017

"Rarely has an author of such deep faith offered such a tolerant, engaging history of any religion."
A learned, lively look at the various faiths lumped together as Protestant, from Martin Luther in the 16th century to today. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 4, 2017

"A nonscholarly work that lay readers will find especially engaging."
A pertinent study of how the Islamic world played quick catch-up to the West over the course of the 19th century. Read full book review >
THE EVANGELICALS by Frances FitzGerald
HISTORY
Released: April 4, 2017

"Overflowing with historical anecdote and contemporary reportage and essential to interpreting the current political and cultural landscape."
Another superb work by renowned but long-absent political journalist FitzGerald (Vietnam: Spirits of the Earth, 2002, etc.), this one centering on the roiling conflict among American brands of Christianity. Read full book review >
THE ROAD TO JONESTOWN by Jeff Guinn
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 11, 2017

"A vivid, fascinating revisitation of a time and series of episodes fast receding into history even as their forgotten survivors still walk among us."
"Kool-Aid rather than equality is what the rest of the world remembers"—a searing account of what has since become a byword for religious cultism. Read full book review >
THE SOULS OF CHINA by Ian Johnson
HISTORY
Released: April 11, 2017

"Engaging, timely, and humane."
An exploration of the role of faith in contemporary China. Read full book review >
MADNESS RULES THE HOUR by Paul Starobin
HISTORY
Released: April 11, 2017

"A dramatic and engaging addition to Civil War studies that serves as a fitting bookend paired with Jay Winik's account of the end of the war, April 1865 (2001)."
It was 1860 in Charleston, South Carolina, the political epicenter of the Old South, at a time of polarized partisanship. Things did not turn out well at all. Read full book review >
DOWN THE UP STAIRCASE by Bruce D. Haynes
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 11, 2017

"A candid and profoundly personal contribution to America's racial history."
A family's story reflects social upheaval. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >