History Book Reviews

THE ALPS by Stephen O’Shea
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"This spirited jaunt into the peaks of Europe may inspire readers to pack their bags."
A tour through the Alps reveals history, geology, anthropology, and local customs. Read full book review >
HOMO DEUS by Yuval Noah Harari
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A relentlessly fascinating book that is sure to become—and deserves to be—a bestseller."
In an intellectually provocative follow-up to Sapiens (2015), Harari (History/Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem) looks to the future. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"The Robbins controversy featured arguments about alien rights, asylum, national identity, and the meaning and scope of American citizenship, all of which persist and all of which Ekirch handles with remarkable dexterity."
A historian revisits a little-remembered incident, the murderous 1797 mutiny aboard HMS Hermione, and traces its startling ramifications. Read full book review >
CONVERGENCE by Peter Watson
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Those who reject the idea of convergence outright may not get far in this book, but readers with no objection to a sweeping, entirely fascinating history of science during the last 200 years will find an abundance of enlightening material."
The journalist and polymath delivers a delightful exploration of "the deepest idea in the universe." Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A valuable contribution to the history of the early republic and to the scholarly literature of civil rights."
In actual practice, it has been far from self-evident in America that all men—all people—are created equal. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 20, 2017

"For food history and presidential history buffs alike, both entertaining and illuminating."
"The White House kitchen is a workplace, just like any other professional kitchen"—except, of course, that it's much more than that, a subject that food historian Miller (Soul Food, 2013) explores with gusto. Read full book review >
CANNIBALISM by Bill Schutt
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"One takeaway: humans don't taste like chicken. A learned, accessible, and engaging approach to a meaty—beg pardon—and always-controversial subject."
Zoologist Schutt (Biology/LIU Post; Dark Banquet: Blood and the Curious Lives of Blood-Feeding Creatures, 2008) gets to the heart of the matter of a topic that makes people shudder. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An exciting, suspenseful tale of international intrigue."
An elegant presentation of Winston Churchill's special guerrilla operations force, which consistently met the dirty exigencies of war. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An engrossing, haunting journey for bibliophiles and World War II historians."
An erudite exploration of the systematic plundering of libraries and book collections by Nazi invaders. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A lively and edifying narrative with lessons for today."
In her first book, Purnell gets our nerve endings tingling with an exploration of the interplay of mind and body as seen through the lens of the Enlightenment. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An intimate, often affecting look back at a group of young men who established an American air superiority that persists to this day."
In his first book, a British journalist tells the story of the airmen who reduced the Third Reich to ashes. Read full book review >
FROM BACTERIA TO BACH AND BACK by Daniel C. Dennett
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Anyone interested in modern theories of the mind and consciousness has to reckon with Dennett. This book, dense but accessible, is as good a place as any to start."
The dean of consciousness-raising consciousness-explaining returns with another cleareyed exploration of the mind. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >