THE MEANING OF THE LIBRARY by Alice Crawford
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: July 1, 2015

"A rich, informative, and engaging collection."
The invention and reinvention of libraries. Read full book review >
OUT OF ASHES by Konrad H. Jarausch
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 2015

"Comprehensive and with a convincing closing defense of the best of European ideals as contrasted with the 'prescriptions of military strength, unilateral intervention, unrestrained speculation, and social conservatism' that prevail on the other side of the Atlantic."
Massive but well-contained and richly detailed account of history's bloodiest century. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 13, 2015

"An accessible and expansive look at the development of the atom bomb, but those looking for a deeper understanding of Oppenheimer and Groves should look elsewhere—either Ray Monk's Robert Oppenheimer (2013) or Kai Bird and Martin Sherwin's American Prometheus (2005)."
Former University of Texas vice president Kunetka (Shadow Man, 1988, etc.) follows the long road to the atom bomb.Read full book review >
GUMPTION by Nick Offerman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 26, 2015

"A smart book of straight talk where laughter and logic meet."
An actor's comedic exploration into America's most gumption-exemplifying citizens. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: July 14, 2015

"Reading this book would be a great first step toward further civil rights progress."
An examination of how the Americans with Disabilities Act came about, 25 years after the legislation passed into law. Read full book review >

HUMANKIND by Alexander Harcourt
HISTORY
Released: June 15, 2015

"Homogenization is inevitable, but we are an extraordinarily varied species today, and Harcourt delivers an opinionated but always science-based account of how we got that way."
In his previous book, Harcourt (Emeritus, Anthropology/Univ. of California, Davis) wrote a definitive text on his specialty: Human Biogeography (2012). This book, directed at a popular audience, is a dense and often politically incorrect but lucid summary of everything you would want to know about human diversity.Read full book review >
THE PAWNBROKER'S DAUGHTER by Maxine Kumin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 6, 2015

"Kumin and her husband experienced an idyllic life on their 200-acre horse farm in New Hampshire, 'living a wide-open lifestyle.' Happily, she shared that life with the rest of us through her writing."
A posthumous publication of five essays by former Poet Laureate Kumin (And Short the Seasons: Poems, 2014, etc.), who died in 2014.Read full book review >
MEANWHILE THERE ARE LETTERS by Suzanne Marrs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 7, 2015

"An intimate, luminous portrait of a friendship."
Tender letters reveal interwoven literary lives. Read full book review >
VENDETTA by James Neff
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 7, 2015

"The sordid, sweeping history of what Kennedy insider Pierre Salinger dubbed 'a blood feud.'"
Seattle Times investigations editor Neff (The Wrong Man: The Final Verdict on the Dr. Sam Sheppard Murder Case, 2001, etc.) turns his attention to the visceral war of wills between Bobby Kennedy and Jimmy Hoffa.Read full book review >
DAISY TURNER'S KIN by Jane C. Beck
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2015

"A well-excavated biography of a 'custodian of a multigenerational American family saga.'"
A deeply, patiently researched journey into the unusual English-African roots of a long-lived Grafton, Vermont, storyteller. Read full book review >
DARK PLACES OF THE EARTH by Jonathan M. Bryant
HISTORY
Released: July 13, 2015

"A richly documented work that restores the Antelope to its central place in the long, grim history of the Atlantic slave trade."
The little-known story of a slave ship, the fate of its captives, and its place in American history. Read full book review >
BEING BERLUSCONI by Michael Day
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 21, 2015

"As entertaining and shocking as one would hope for, but the book leaves readers with more questions than answers."
In the first comprehensive examination of former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's life and career, Independent Italy correspondent Day paints a lively but noncomplex picture of an ambitious and deeply flawed man in a system that accommodated his numerous vices.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >