THE GRAVEYARD APARTMENT by Mariko Koike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"There's a vacancy in the Graveyard Apartment. Just not the one the author intended."
A too-good-to-be-true apartment turns out to be exactly that for a young Japanese family in this supernatural thriller. Read full book review >
THE STORY OF THE WORLD IN 100 SPECIES by Christopher Lloyd
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A good fit for middle and high school libraries as a useful reference."
An encyclopedic history of the emergence of life on Earth that "traces the history of life from the dawn of evolution to the present day through the lens of one hundred living things that have changed the world." Read full book review >

STALIN'S ENGLISHMAN by Andrew Lownie
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"A crack biography of a man who was a preposterous enigma."
A biography of "the most complex and enigmatic of the Cambridge Spies," a group of men recruited during the 1930s to spy for the Soviet Union. Read full book review >
GRAND HOTEL ABYSS by Stuart Jeffries
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"A rich, intellectually meaty history."
Life inside the 20th-century's reigning citadel of pessimism, as told through the lives and (often conflicting) philosophies of its key thinkers. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Much of the work will be confusing to the mathematically disinclined, but their story is inspiring and enlightening."
An inside look at the World War II-era black female mathematicians who assisted greatly in the United States' aeronautics industry. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"A fine new account of an unnecessary crisis that 'scattered dragon's teeth on all-too-fertile soil,' which 'would bear gruesome fruit for decades.'"
A tale of political bungling with tragic consequences on two continents. Read full book review >
WHERE MEMORY LEADS by Saul Friedländer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"Though dry in tone, the book is haunting in scope and depth."
A foremost Holocaust scholar carefully reflects on his harsh early years and lifelong academic mission in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Geneva, and Los Angeles. Read full book review >
THE PATH TO WAR by Michael S. Neiberg
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 3, 2016

"A valiant attempt to dispel 'America's collective amnesia over the First World War.'"
A fresh look at America's reluctance to enter World War I as a mass consensus rather than any single faulty decision by President Woodrow Wilson. Read full book review >
ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, VOLUME 3 by Blanche Wiesen Cook
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A winning concluding volume in a series that does for Eleanor Roosevelt what Robert Caro has done for Lyndon Johnson."
Having already devoted more than 1,200 pages to the extraordinary life of Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) in two previous installments, the skilled biographer offers the final volume. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A lovingly written book that should appeal to most city dwellers and all tree lovers."
A comprehensive look at the trees of American cities. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"A rollicking tale of 'unparalleled bravery and ingenuity, interspersed with moments of rank incompetence, raw brutality and touching human frailty.'"
An "authorized" but not "official" or "comprehensive" history of Britain's swashbuckling Special Air Service. Read full book review >
PAX ROMANA by Adrian Goldsworthy
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"An engrossing account of how the Roman Empire grew and operated."
An exploration of the "Roman Peace," which held "sway over much of Western Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa for centuries." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >