THE WOMAN'S HOUSE by H.L.V. Fletcher

THE WOMAN'S HOUSE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Escapist and romantic, relaxed yet not dull, this is a pleasing idyll of a small Welsh village and the undercurrents in the lives of Lizbeth and Martin. Startled by his resemblance to her vanished husband, Lizbeth mistook a tramp for him, and the tramp, curious, pretended to be Martin, claiming aphasia. Circumstances prevented his leaving as planned, he fell in love with Lizbeth and stayed- the model husband. Until the minister denounced them, the tramp thought Lizbeth was tricked. She, however, had realized the truth, but had come to love him. Overhanging their happiness was the threat of the bog, where the real Martin, a drunkard, had drowned in Lizbeth's sight- while she, fearing acousation of murder, had invented a tale of his going to sea. The tranquil life of the farm, Martin's gradual integration into the community and overcoming the barriers to this unconventional union weave a pleasurable spell. Rentals-women-and, despite the unorthodox situation, most public libraries.

Publisher: Messner