THE LADY FROM COLORADO by Homer Croy

THE LADY FROM COLORADO

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Based on an actual character- and available records, this is the story of Katie Lawder who came to Pronghorn, Colorado, as a washerwoman, ended as Lady Moon, and while she acquired a certain decorum and dignity along with the title and her years- she never lost her warm and democratic instinct. A pretty girl of considerable courage, she was the first to size and show up a local bad man, Kondorf, later insured the affection of Cecil Ernest Moon- one of a number of British toffs learning to be a cowboy- when she saved him from a hanging at the hands of Kondorf. With her marriage to Cecil they returned to England, to face the disapproval of his mother when she was found shooting dice with the butler Blunt, later to earn her respect when she secured an audience- through her own efforts alone- with Queen Victoria. Returning to Colorado, with Blunt, and again adding the Indian Sarah Chicken to her household, Katie began to entertain in style- finally achieving her fullest social ambition in Denver.... Homer Croy, no more polished than his subject, offers an admiring account of her- and a goodnatured sort of entertainment of strongest regional value.

Pub Date: July 29th, 1957
Publisher: Duell, Sloan & Pearce