NO POCKETS IN A SHROUD by Horace McCoy

NO POCKETS IN A SHROUD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The often underrated Horace McCoy, whose classic “hard-boiled” fiction includes Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye and They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?, came a cropper with this hyperbolic and preachy 1937 novel about a tough-guy crusading journalist. In a rapidly paced succession of intense confrontational scenes, McCoy records the adventures of Mike Dolan, a newspaperman who quits his job when his editor kills Dolan’s story about a baseball bribery scandal. Managing (rather unbelievably) to publish his own magazine (Cosmopolite), Dolan goes after a murderous abortionist and a KKK-like racist group, loses the highborn girl he loves, marries a senator’s daughter on the rebound, and meets his predictable fate in a predictably dark alley. Dolan’s righteous fury is intensely communicated, but he’s an unconvincing paragon of liberal energies, and the novel is a clichÇ-ridden endorsement of his stagy macho morality. Probably the talented McCoy’s worst book.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1998
ISBN: 1-85242-434-6
Page count: 184pp
Publisher: Serpent’s Tail
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1st, 1998