Nightmares Unhinged by Joshua Viola
Released: Oct. 11, 2015

"A slew of gloriously disturbing, well-told tales to unnerve readers."
Viola (Luna One, 2014, etc.) amasses a series of blistering horror stories, including a few of his own, from authors who tell of vampires, demons, killers, and things better left hidden in the dark.Read full book review >
Lucifer's Son by Sergey Mavrodi
Released: Oct. 9, 2015

"Protracted but deliciously creepy explorations of the macabre."
In Mavrodi's (Apocalypse, 2013) first installment of a series, the devil's own son causes multiple grotesque events. Read full book review >

Developing Minds by Jonathan LaPoma
Released: Sept. 14, 2015

"Entertaining and authentic look at the troubled American educational system, courtesy of two men propelled by perseverance and adventuresome spirits."
Two unlikely friends learn about life and hard work through the students they teach. Read full book review >
Daughters of Frankenstein by Steve Berman
Released: Aug. 5, 2015

"A lively and engrossing collection of female-driven fiction."
Berman (Red Caps: New Fairy Tales for Out of the Ordinary Readers, 2014, etc.) edits an anthology of sci-fi and horror from queer perspectives. Read full book review >
Tooth & Talon by James Lee
Released: July 20, 2015

"Eerie, entertaining tales whose recurring themes and characters make them stronger."
Vampires, otherworldly creatures, and human killers populate Lee's debut collection of horror and suspense stories. Read full book review >

The Key by Timothy Weatherall
Released: July 8, 2015

"A promising first installment in a strange blend of theological horror."
An intriguing supernatural tale in which a young man uncovers a hidden truth about his heritage. Read full book review >
THE UNNOTICEABLES by Robert Brockway
Released: July 7, 2015

"A nasty, freaky, and haphazardly funny horror story."
A punk-rock vagabond circa 1977 and a struggling Hollywood stuntwoman circa 2013 find themselves connected through a grotesque paranormal underground society. Read full book review >
Knack by Tom Twitchel
Released: July 7, 2015

"A darkly polished superteen adventure."
This YA novel stars a handicapped teen with special powers striving to make the most of his traumatic past. Read full book review >
I Am Titanium by John Patrick Kennedy
Released: June 18, 2015

"The sort of teen horror-fantasy that would play well for high school heshers drawing horror comics in study hall."
Mayhem reigns as a dying boy and an outcast girl are boosted to the level of miraculous superhumans and thrust into violent battle against monstrous forces (or each other). Read full book review >
WORLD WAR MOO by Michael Logan
Released: June 9, 2015

"If it all sounds slightly bonkers, it is—but Logan's unique combination of bombastic action sequences, off-kilter characters, and wild-eyed scenarios should please fans of speculative fiction and horror alike."
The stakes are raised when opposing forces threaten all-out war in the midst of the zombie apocalypse. Read full book review >
SWEET by Emmy Laybourne
Released: June 2, 2015

"A glitzy bloodbath with the most ironic title ever. (Horror. 13 & up)"
Celebrities, romance, and carnage on the high seas. Read full book review >
BE NOT AFRAID by Cecilia Galante
Released: April 28, 2015

"A quick, freaky read. (Horror. 13 & up)"
A girl finds herself unwillingly connected to her classmate's spiritual possession. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >