Horror Book Reviews (page 2)

THE EVIL OF OZ by Ryan Fuller
Released: April 7, 2015

"An assertive, endearingly deranged take on the well-known tale from a writer-artist duo readers will want to keep their eyes on."
In Fuller and Baijnath's debut graphic-novel reimagining of L. Frank Baum's classic, Dorothy returns to an Oz corrupted by evil in a tale of bloody retribution. Read full book review >
BONES & ALL by Camille DeAngelis
Released: March 10, 2015

"The book reads like a cheesy episode of Buffy, the Vampire Slayer."
Love is challenging for any species—but things get more complicated when you're a ghoul who wants to eat anyone who gets close to you. Read full book review >

A LOVE LIKE BLOOD by Marcus Sedgwick
Released: Feb. 10, 2015

"In this macabre psychological thriller, Sedgwick offers atmospheric settings and a relentless, chilling plot that gives a whole new meaning to the idea of 'blood feud.'"
In Sedgwick's first adult fiction, Charles Jackson, a young World War II soldier, happens upon a horrific crime—a perverted ritual?—that haunts him for decades. Read full book review >
THE DAMNED by Andrew Pyper
Released: Feb. 10, 2015

"A treat for fans of intelligent treatments of the supernatural and rock-solid writing."
Pyper's portrait of twins—one good and one evil—isn't a new literary concept, but his version is memorable and, perhaps, nightmare-inducing. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"Custer completists will want to have a look, but there are many better books on the subject."
Revisionist study of one of the most signal defeats in the annals of America. Read full book review >

Released: Jan. 13, 2015

"A rather thrilling adventure spun off from a throwaway joke."
Grahame-Smith (Unholy Night, 2012, etc.) continues his lunatic reimagining of American history after the death of Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter.Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"Deft characterization, but reading about someone this relentlessly unconscionable will make most readers lunge for the shower as soon as they've reached the final page."
William Heming sells real estate, but that's not his only pursuit in this dark first-person tale by English journalist Hogan. Read full book review >
GIDEON by Alex Gordon
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"This novel will thoroughly satisfy readers looking for suspense, horror and a grisly good time."
A seductive work of paranormal horror that will draw readers into its cold and gloomy world. Read full book review >
SUICIDE FOREST by Jeremy Bates
Released: Dec. 16, 2014

"Bates' choice to avoid brazen scares makes for an understated horror story that will remind readers what chattering teeth sound like."
In Bates' (The Taste of Fear, 2012, etc.) horror novel, a simple excursion into a reputedly haunted forest turns into a nightmare when people start dying in conspicuously unnatural ways.Read full book review >
THE PARDONER'S TALE by Morgan Ferdinand
Released: Dec. 6, 2014

"This supernatural thriller's humor and well-developed relationships will keep the pages turning."
Ferdinand's sharp debut novel features a shape-shifting private eye who's hellbent on slaying demonic beasts. Read full book review >
Kazungul Book 1 by Marcus L.  Lukusa
Released: Nov. 18, 2014

"The groundwork for a sci-fi epic is here, but the story falls short of its lofty aspirations."
An ambitious sci-fi debut pits a young man against ancient forces, heavenly armies, and his own bloodline. Read full book review >
REVIVAL by Stephen King
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"No one does psychological terror better than King. Another spine-tingling pleasure for his fans."
In his second novel of 2014 (the other being Mr. Mercedes), veteran yarn spinner King continues to point out the unspeakably spooky weirdness that lies on the fringes of ordinary life. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >