Horror Book Reviews (page 4)

THREE HUNDRED MILLION by Blake Butler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A graphic horror story that aspires to repel its readers."
A police detective attempts to deconstruct the ruined mind of a mass murderer. Maybe. Read full book review >
WITHERED HOSTS by Scott Bisig
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"This intelligent, psychologically acute and truly spooky ghost story is an entertaining, impressive debut."
After tragedy strikes a young family, the survivors move to a new, creepy apartment, and they're haunted by more than just their grief. Read full book review >

A CRIME AND A CURSE by Vincent Macraven
Released: Oct. 10, 2014

"A ghastly detective story and a macabre parable that should accommodate genre fans with a nightmare or two."
Macraven's (Testament of the Dead, 2014, etc.) latest horror outing is a two-story collection that delves into the dark hearts of people whose depravity includes murder and black magic. Read full book review >
HELL'S GATES by Mary Masters
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 9, 2014

"Alive with a devilish plot, the book takes a satisfying, twisted journey into evil."
From debut author Masters comes a novel about the sinister side of a small town and the local sheriff's attempts to uncover the truth. Read full book review >
THE BOY WHO DREW MONSTERS by Keith Donohue
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"A sterling example of the new breed of horror: unnerving and internal with just the right number of bumps in the night."
What happens when the monsters under the bed come from the boy sleeping on top of it? Read full book review >

BROOD by Chase Novak
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"Novak ably combines realism and the supernatural, even if the result is sometimes too preposterous even for suspenders of disbelief."
Feral children, the result of fertility treatments gone horribly awry, roam the streets of Manhattan in Novak's hit-or-miss follow-up to Breed (2012).Read full book review >
The Holy Innocents and Other Stories by Joan Carol Bird
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 5, 2014

"An offbeat set of horror stories that impart subtle, rather than raw, shocks."
Short story writer Bird (Nightmare and Nostalgia,2013) offers five tales of the fantastic, most involving haunted (or haunting) females. Read full book review >
ASBURY DARK by Lori Bonfitto
Released: Oct. 1, 2014

"Short stories for readers who like their horror tales diverting and diverse."
In Bonfitto's (The Lineman, 2013, etc.) horror collection, Asbury Park, New Jersey, provides the setting for seven strange, spooky stories.Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 23, 2014

"An engaging introduction to what, Lindal says, is a world just outside our grasp."
Fictionalized account of one soul's discovery of the spiritual self. Read full book review >
HORRORSTÖR by Grady Hendrix
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 23, 2014

"A treat for fans of The Evil Dead or Zombieland, complete with affordable solutions for better living.
"
A hardy band of big-box retail employees must dig down for their personal courage when ghosts begin stalking them through home furnishings. Read full book review >
FALL OF NIGHT by Jonathan Maberry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"The end of the world as we know it, complete with 24-style dialogue and enough oozy bits to make Tom Savini queasy."
The apocalypse goes viral in the sequel to the gorefest Dead of Night (2011) as a viral outbreak and a hurricane wreak havoc on Stebbins, Pennsylvania.Read full book review >
QUALIA NOUS by Michael Bailey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 31, 2014

"An accomplished collection of masterfully crafted horror from some of the genre's finest practitioners."
Bailey (Chiral Mad, 2013, etc.) edits this sci-fi/horror anthology of fiction and poetry. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >