Horror Book Reviews (page 5)

Orion Poe and the Lost Explorer by Will  Summerhouse
Released: May 19, 2014

"A wild, imaginative adventure that explores the ends of the world."
Summerhouse's debut is a charming children's story of adventure and mystery in the least likely of places. Read full book review >
Vampires In The Vatican by Stephen James Burch
Released: May 14, 2014

"Lord maketh darkness, just as He maketh the light.'"
In Burch's (Angels and Vampires, 2013) horror novel, a conflict boils over at the Vatican, where the ranks of evil have learned to blend in with the good. Read full book review >

Dark South by William T. Stewart
Released: May 12, 2014

"Quite a collection of dark gems; readers looking for somber tales with Southern flair need look no further."
Stewart's debut is a collection of short horror stories from the Southern U.S., where ghosts, vampires and the darker side of humanity tend to reside. Read full book review >
Released: May 5, 2014

"Another worthy entry in this love-and-fangs series."
In the third installment of their horror series, Hays and McFall (The Cowboy and the Vampire: Blood and Whiskey, 2014, etc.) return to LonePine, Wyoming, as human Tucker and vampire Lizzie discover that they have a whole new type of bloodsucker to worry about. Read full book review >
THE FLIP by Michael Phillip Cash
Released: May 4, 2014

"A deliciously deft horror page-turner."
In Cash's (Collision, 2014) horror novel, a young couple confronts malicious spirits while renovating a Victorian mansion. Read full book review >

THE FOREVER SONG by Julie Kagawa
Released: April 15, 2014

"A bloody good way to end a trilogy. (discussion questions) (Horror. 14 & up)"
Vampire Allie, one of the genre's toughest heroines, returns with one last chance to save both vampire- and humankind in this conclusion to the Blood of Eden series. Read full book review >
CROW CREEK by Thomas Drago
Released: April 15, 2014

"A brisk, accomplished horror debut from an author to watch."
In Drago's debut novel, an insidious horror reveals itself in a small North Carolina town. Read full book review >
HYDE by Daniel Levine
Released: March 18, 2014

"Cleverly imagined and sophisticated in execution, this book may appeal to those who like magical realism and vampire stories, but the latter should know that the book is more intellectual than thriller."
Levine debuts with a dark literary-fiction re-imagining of the macabre tale of Dr. Jekyll and Mister Hyde. Read full book review >
Released: March 1, 2014

"Although Hambly's fans may enjoy returning to her carefully constructed and lavishly detailed world, the uninitiated may be less enthralled."
On the eve of World War I, a couple fights to rescue their daughter from a vampire's clutches. Read full book review >
Bat Blood: The Devil's Claw by Richard Myerscough
Released: Feb. 7, 2014

"An intriguing scientific concept that unfortunately devolves into a splatterfest."
This debut novel is a frightening but labored journey through the perils of unfettered scientific research. Read full book review >
MONSTER CITY by John Cowlin
Released: Dec. 20, 2013

"A fun read for PI aficionados and kitschy horror fans alike."
A jaded private detective in a monster-stricken city gets more than he bargained for when his client dies under suspicious circumstances. Read full book review >
UNSETTLING by Vincent Macraven
Released: Dec. 19, 2013

"Three riveting stories of evil, revenge and death."
Fresh, original horror in three bone-chilling novellas. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >