Horror Book Reviews (page 5)

Foehammer by Duncan Campbell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 3, 2014

"An often refreshing tale that will thrill, horrify, and amuse in equal measure."
A motley band of misfits must defeat an ancient, deadly foe in Campbell's debut sci-fi/horror novel. Read full book review >
Kazungul Book 1 by Marcus L.  Lukusa
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 18, 2014

"The groundwork for a sci-fi epic is here, but the story falls short of its lofty aspirations."
An ambitious sci-fi debut pits a young man against ancient forces, heavenly armies, and his own bloodline. Read full book review >

REVIVAL by Stephen King
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"No one does psychological terror better than King. Another spine-tingling pleasure for his fans."
In his second novel of 2014 (the other being Mr. Mercedes), veteran yarn spinner King continues to point out the unspeakably spooky weirdness that lies on the fringes of ordinary life. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 5, 2014

"A flawed but strangely engrossing tale that's sometimes tragic and sometimes farcical.
"
A Mississippi family survives the Great Depression by making bootleg wine, but one member meets a tragic end in this memoir. Read full book review >
PATH OF NEEDLES by Alison Littlewood
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"Tied together by bird sightings, both the main characters spend page after page contemplating what they've seen, said and done, making for a frustrating story that will please neither fans of crime nor fans of horror."
The death of a young girl brings together a dull female police officer and an equally dull professor who specializes in sorting through classic versions of fairy tales in Littlewood's lackluster sophomore effort. Read full book review >

Released: Nov. 3, 2014

"An alternative, humanistic view of ancient Europe that's worthy of readers' consideration.
"
In her debut anthropological treatise, Änggård describes a more peaceful, egalitarian past for Europe. Read full book review >
THE GIRL EATER by Bill Cooke
Released: Oct. 29, 2014

"Reads like an introduction to something bigger; fans partial to epic apocalyptic thrillers should keep an eye out."
In Cooke's debut thriller, copycat murders that seem to be emulating the work of a serial killer culminate in lethal riots in the Texas Hill Country, leading the few survivors no choice but to fend for themselves. Read full book review >
A COLLECTION OF ANGELS by Jesse Budi
Released: Oct. 18, 2014

"An undeniably disturbing, reverberating story that will make some cringe and others gag."
A swim at the docks for two young brothers becomes a hellish ordeal when they accept an invitation from the wrong people in Budi's debut horror novel. Read full book review >
THE BOY WHO KILLED DEMONS by Dave Zeltserman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 16, 2014

"Zeltserman has written an entertaining novel but not one that will keep you from turning off the lights."
Humor outweighs the horror in this amusing look at a 15-year-old saving the world. Read full book review >
THREE HUNDRED MILLION by Blake Butler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A graphic horror story that aspires to repel its readers."
A police detective attempts to deconstruct the ruined mind of a mass murderer. Maybe. Read full book review >
WITHERED HOSTS by Scott Bisig
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"This intelligent, psychologically acute and truly spooky ghost story is an entertaining, impressive debut."
After tragedy strikes a young family, the survivors move to a new, creepy apartment, and they're haunted by more than just their grief. Read full book review >
A CRIME AND A CURSE by Vincent Macraven
Released: Oct. 10, 2014

"A ghastly detective story and a macabre parable that should accommodate genre fans with a nightmare or two."
Macraven's (Testament of the Dead, 2014, etc.) latest horror outing is a two-story collection that delves into the dark hearts of people whose depravity includes murder and black magic. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >