Horror Book Reviews (page 5)

The Stowaway by Clyde Edwards
Released: July 13, 2014

"A debut horror novel about demonic possession that breathes new life into an old theme."
In Edwards' debut horror novel, a ship's captain discovers a mysterious orb that gradually infuses him with a malevolent personality. Read full book review >
THE BIRD ROOM by Chad Hofmann
Released: July 7, 2014

"Hard-core horror and sci-fi readers will likely enjoy the more original tales in this story collection."
A collection of 17 horror, sci-fi and paranormal tales that, at their best, recall The Twilight Zone and Tales from the Crypt. Read full book review >

MR. MERCEDES by Stephen King
Released: June 3, 2014

"The scariest thing of all is to imagine King writing a happy children's book. This isn't it: It's nicely dark, never predictable and altogether entertaining."
In his latest suspenser, the prolific King (Joyland, 2013, etc.) returns to the theme of the scary car—except this one has a scary driver who's as loony but logical unto himself as old Jack Torrance from The Shining. Read full book review >
Released: May 28, 2014

"An inventive, delectable take on Stoker's classic."
In Wagar's (An American in Vienna, 2011) historical horror novel, detectives in 1896 Transylvania suspect that the enigmatic Count Dracula is responsible for numerous disappearances in the area. Read full book review >
Orion Poe and the Lost Explorer by Will  Summerhouse
Released: May 19, 2014

"A wild, imaginative adventure that explores the ends of the world."
Summerhouse's debut is a charming children's story of adventure and mystery in the least likely of places. Read full book review >

Vampires In The Vatican by Stephen James Burch
Released: May 14, 2014

"Lord maketh darkness, just as He maketh the light.'"
In Burch's (Angels and Vampires, 2013) horror novel, a conflict boils over at the Vatican, where the ranks of evil have learned to blend in with the good. Read full book review >
Dark South by William T. Stewart
Released: May 12, 2014

"Quite a collection of dark gems; readers looking for somber tales with Southern flair need look no further."
Stewart's debut is a collection of short horror stories from the Southern U.S., where ghosts, vampires and the darker side of humanity tend to reside. Read full book review >
Released: May 5, 2014

"Another worthy entry in this love-and-fangs series."
In the third installment of their horror series, Hays and McFall (The Cowboy and the Vampire: Blood and Whiskey, 2014, etc.) return to LonePine, Wyoming, as human Tucker and vampire Lizzie discover that they have a whole new type of bloodsucker to worry about. Read full book review >
THE FLIP by Michael Phillip Cash
Released: May 4, 2014

"A deliciously deft horror page-turner."
In Cash's (Collision, 2014) horror novel, a young couple confronts malicious spirits while renovating a Victorian mansion. Read full book review >
THE FOREVER SONG by Julie Kagawa
Released: April 15, 2014

"A bloody good way to end a trilogy. (discussion questions) (Horror. 14 & up)"
Vampire Allie, one of the genre's toughest heroines, returns with one last chance to save both vampire- and humankind in this conclusion to the Blood of Eden series. Read full book review >
CROW CREEK by Thomas Drago
Released: April 15, 2014

"A brisk, accomplished horror debut from an author to watch."
In Drago's debut novel, an insidious horror reveals itself in a small North Carolina town. Read full book review >
HYDE by Daniel Levine
Released: March 18, 2014

"Cleverly imagined and sophisticated in execution, this book may appeal to those who like magical realism and vampire stories, but the latter should know that the book is more intellectual than thriller."
Levine debuts with a dark literary-fiction re-imagining of the macabre tale of Dr. Jekyll and Mister Hyde. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >