Horror Book Reviews (page 5)

SUICIDE FOREST by Jeremy Bates
Released: Dec. 16, 2014

"Bates' choice to avoid brazen scares makes for an understated horror story that will remind readers what chattering teeth sound like."
In Bates' (The Taste of Fear, 2012, etc.) horror novel, a simple excursion into a reputedly haunted forest turns into a nightmare when people start dying in conspicuously unnatural ways.Read full book review >
THE PARDONER'S TALE by Morgan Ferdinand
Released: Dec. 6, 2014

"This supernatural thriller's humor and well-developed relationships will keep the pages turning."
Ferdinand's sharp debut novel features a shape-shifting private eye who's hellbent on slaying demonic beasts. Read full book review >

Foehammer by Duncan Campbell
Released: Dec. 3, 2014

"An often refreshing tale that will thrill, horrify, and amuse in equal measure."
A motley band of misfits must defeat an ancient, deadly foe in Campbell's debut sci-fi/horror novel. Read full book review >
Kazungul Book 1 by Marcus L.  Lukusa
Released: Nov. 18, 2014

"The groundwork for a sci-fi epic is here, but the story falls short of its lofty aspirations."
An ambitious sci-fi debut pits a young man against ancient forces, heavenly armies, and his own bloodline. Read full book review >
REVIVAL by Stephen King
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"No one does psychological terror better than King. Another spine-tingling pleasure for his fans."
In his second novel of 2014 (the other being Mr. Mercedes), veteran yarn spinner King continues to point out the unspeakably spooky weirdness that lies on the fringes of ordinary life. Read full book review >

Released: Nov. 5, 2014

"A flawed but strangely engrossing tale that's sometimes tragic and sometimes farcical.
A Mississippi family survives the Great Depression by making bootleg wine, but one member meets a tragic end in this memoir. Read full book review >
PATH OF NEEDLES by Alison Littlewood
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"Tied together by bird sightings, both the main characters spend page after page contemplating what they've seen, said and done, making for a frustrating story that will please neither fans of crime nor fans of horror."
The death of a young girl brings together a dull female police officer and an equally dull professor who specializes in sorting through classic versions of fairy tales in Littlewood's lackluster sophomore effort. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 3, 2014

"An alternative, humanistic view of ancient Europe that's worthy of readers' consideration.
In her debut anthropological treatise, Änggård describes a more peaceful, egalitarian past for Europe. Read full book review >
THE GIRL EATER by Bill Cooke
Released: Oct. 29, 2014

"Reads like an introduction to something bigger; fans partial to epic apocalyptic thrillers should keep an eye out."
In Cooke's debut thriller, copycat murders that seem to be emulating the work of a serial killer culminate in lethal riots in the Texas Hill Country, leading the few survivors no choice but to fend for themselves. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 18, 2014

"An undeniably disturbing, reverberating story that will make some cringe and others gag."
A swim at the docks for two young brothers becomes a hellish ordeal when they accept an invitation from the wrong people in Budi's debut horror novel. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 16, 2014

"Zeltserman has written an entertaining novel but not one that will keep you from turning off the lights."
Humor outweighs the horror in this amusing look at a 15-year-old saving the world. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A graphic horror story that aspires to repel its readers."
A police detective attempts to deconstruct the ruined mind of a mass murderer. Maybe. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >