Horror Book Reviews (page 61)

VALENTINE by S.P. Somtow
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Okay for existing vamps, but won't win many new fans."
Sequel to Somtow's 1985 paperback Vampire Junction: more lurid, appalling, spectacular bloodsucking from the splatterpunk author of The Shattered Horse (1986) and Moon Dance (1990). Read full book review >
THE RIGHT KIND OF WAR by John McCormick
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Gung-ho and good."
A Marine Raider veteran of the war in the Pacific puts his WW II battle memories into unsentimental, unrevisionist novel form. Read full book review >

NIGHTMARE FLOWER by Elizabeth Engstrom
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 18, 1992

"Often inventive and fanciful, pat and pulpy, goose-bump yarns, many of which have appeared in horror, fantasy, and sf mags."
Engstrom, author of the interesting Lizzie Borden (1991), has labored in the horror genre before (When Darkness Loves Us, 1985) with uncertain results. Read full book review >
BEST NEW HORROR 3 by Stephen Jones
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

"Not to be missed by any serious fan."
Through intelligent selection and commentary, Jones (ed. Read full book review >
I, TITUBA, BLACK WITCH OF SALEM by Maryse Conde
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Tituba deserves better."
Caribbean-born CondÇ (Segu, 1987; The Children of Segu, 1989; and see below) gives questionable life to Tituba, one of the accused and subsequently released witches of Salem, in a novel of some conflicting purpose. Read full book review >

THE YEAR'S BEST FANTASY AND HORROR by Ellen Datlow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 18, 1992

"Pity the price tag has left orbit and was last seen heading for Mars."
Another mammoth and eclectic collection of 44 tales and six poems drawn from 1991's short-format output. Read full book review >
GHOSTWRIGHT by Michael Cadnum
THRILLERS
Released: July 15, 1992

"Cadnum's hyperbolic horror tale, always gripping and smartly paced but usually shaded just this side of ludicrous—and sometimes not even."
A celebrated playwright is stalked by his muse in Cadnum's first non-occult novel, an overwrought thriller that's nonetheless as effectively macabre as his supernatural yarns (St. Read full book review >
GERALD'S GAME by Stephen King
THRILLERS
Released: July 13, 1992

"This one is really scary."
King takes it over the top, way over the top, in an exquisitely horrifying frightfest about a woman forced to face her deepest fears—and then some. Read full book review >
CHILDREN OF THE NIGHT by Dan Simmons
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 1992

"Toothsomely well written."
Simmons (Summer of Night, Carrion Comfort, Song of Kali, etc.) slips into Bram Stoker/Anne Rice territory and writes his best novel ever. Read full book review >
BLOOD BROTHERS by Brian Lumley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1992

"Next: The Bloodwars!"
Sixth symphony in the Necroscope series, an epic vampire cycle begun in paperback (Deadspawn, 1991, etc.) and now shifting to hardcover, with 480 pages of dense lyricism and small print in need of a guide like Frank Herbert's Dune Encyclopedia. Read full book review >
THE COUNT OF ELEVEN by Ramsey Campbell
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 1992

"Back to the occult, Mr. Campbell, please."
Though best known for his occult horror (Midnight Sun, 1990, etc.), Campbell built his career on psychothrillers barely tinged with the uncanny (The Doll Who Ate His Mother, 1976, etc.). Read full book review >
LITTLE BOY LOST by T.M. Wright
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 1992

"Golden-eyed Marie and sharply etched if familiar effects- -shrill winds, looming trees, eerie scratchings—provide a few chills, but not enough to solidify Wright's gaseous plotting."
A six-year-old is kidnapped by his demonic mom—in a fuzzy, soft-core horror yarn from Wright (The School, 1990, etc.) Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >