Horror Book Reviews (page 61)

I, TITUBA, BLACK WITCH OF SALEM by Maryse Conde
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Tituba deserves better."
Caribbean-born CondÇ (Segu, 1987; The Children of Segu, 1989; and see below) gives questionable life to Tituba, one of the accused and subsequently released witches of Salem, in a novel of some conflicting purpose. Read full book review >
THE YEAR'S BEST FANTASY AND HORROR by Ellen Datlow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 18, 1992

"Pity the price tag has left orbit and was last seen heading for Mars."
Another mammoth and eclectic collection of 44 tales and six poems drawn from 1991's short-format output. Read full book review >

GHOSTWRIGHT by Michael Cadnum
THRILLERS
Released: July 15, 1992

"Cadnum's hyperbolic horror tale, always gripping and smartly paced but usually shaded just this side of ludicrous—and sometimes not even."
A celebrated playwright is stalked by his muse in Cadnum's first non-occult novel, an overwrought thriller that's nonetheless as effectively macabre as his supernatural yarns (St. Read full book review >
GERALD'S GAME by Stephen King
THRILLERS
Released: July 13, 1992

"This one is really scary."
King takes it over the top, way over the top, in an exquisitely horrifying frightfest about a woman forced to face her deepest fears—and then some. Read full book review >
CHILDREN OF THE NIGHT by Dan Simmons
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 1992

"Toothsomely well written."
Simmons (Summer of Night, Carrion Comfort, Song of Kali, etc.) slips into Bram Stoker/Anne Rice territory and writes his best novel ever. Read full book review >

BLOOD BROTHERS by Brian Lumley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1992

"Next: The Bloodwars!"
Sixth symphony in the Necroscope series, an epic vampire cycle begun in paperback (Deadspawn, 1991, etc.) and now shifting to hardcover, with 480 pages of dense lyricism and small print in need of a guide like Frank Herbert's Dune Encyclopedia. Read full book review >
THE COUNT OF ELEVEN by Ramsey Campbell
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 1992

"Back to the occult, Mr. Campbell, please."
Though best known for his occult horror (Midnight Sun, 1990, etc.), Campbell built his career on psychothrillers barely tinged with the uncanny (The Doll Who Ate His Mother, 1976, etc.). Read full book review >
LITTLE BOY LOST by T.M. Wright
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 1992

"Golden-eyed Marie and sharply etched if familiar effects- -shrill winds, looming trees, eerie scratchings—provide a few chills, but not enough to solidify Wright's gaseous plotting."
A six-year-old is kidnapped by his demonic mom—in a fuzzy, soft-core horror yarn from Wright (The School, 1990, etc.) Read full book review >
A QUESTION OF TIME by Fred Saberhagen
THRILLERS
Released: May 1, 1992

"Starts well, ends comic-strippy."
Dark fantasy about a deformity in time in the Grand Canyon, by the author of the Berserker and Lost Swords series, etc. Saberhagen begins his time-warp tale by anchoring it solidly in gritty 1935, with down-and-outer Jake Rezner coming across a young woman artist in the Grand Canyon with whom he falls into an affair. Read full book review >
SPIRITWALK by Charles de Lint
THRILLERS
Released: May 1, 1992

"A disappointment from the author of Jack the Giant Killer and Drink the Moon."
A ``fix-up'' to de Lint's Moonheart (1984), consisting of one short and three long stories previously published separately and a brief prologue. Read full book review >
LAST CALL by Tim Powers
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 20, 1992

"Knockout poker sequences give the symbolism real sizzle, while the genre is enlivened throughout with great lines from Eliot."
Rich, top-flight mythic fantasy based on Jungian archetypes, Tarot symbolism, T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, and the Parsifal legend; by the smartly acclaimed author of On Stranger Tides, 1987, etc. Luck could not flow with more Jungian synchronicity for Powers than his having cast Bugsy Siegel as The Fisher King in this long novel just as Warren Beatty's Bugsy has fixed the nation's eye on the Oscar race, along with Robin Williams's turn as The Fisher King. Read full book review >
DARK AT HEART by Karen Lansdale
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 15, 1992

"What might have been a groundbreaking anthology, a Dark Forces of crime fiction, proves nothing more than a competent but uninspired anthology with no cutting edge."
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 3, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >