Horror Book Reviews (page 61)

AUNT DIMITY'S DEATH by Nancy Atherton
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Amiable, stylishly written—often with a touch of wry humor: a first novel for readers with an interest in the occult—and a high tolerance level for sentimental silliness."
Thirtyish Lori Shepherd—divorced; her mother recently deceased; her expertise in rare books finding no takers—is sharing digs and doing temp work when a letter reaches her from Willis and Willis, a venerable Boston law firm. Read full book review >
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 31, 1992

"Irresistible as Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin's All of Me."
Rice fans awaiting the finale of 1990's The Witching Hour will be only temporarily dismayed by the author's fourth bloodletting and the return of the Vampire Lestat—in what is Rice's most strongly plotted novel yet. Read full book review >

NIGHTWORLD by
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 15, 1992

"Gripping and gruesome super-comic-book stuff—but let's hope this is it."
Cataclysmic horror novel, sixth and final in a series begun with The Keep (1981). Read full book review >
LOST SOULS by Poppy Z. Brite
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 5, 1992

"Brite tosses out any idea of good taste and remakes the language of horror with a bloodlust that reduces all competitors to dust."
Bloodfest first novel written by acid-crazed vampires cooling off on marijuana. Read full book review >
VALENTINE by S.P. Somtow
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Okay for existing vamps, but won't win many new fans."
Sequel to Somtow's 1985 paperback Vampire Junction: more lurid, appalling, spectacular bloodsucking from the splatterpunk author of The Shattered Horse (1986) and Moon Dance (1990). Read full book review >

THE RIGHT KIND OF WAR by John McCormick
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Gung-ho and good."
A Marine Raider veteran of the war in the Pacific puts his WW II battle memories into unsentimental, unrevisionist novel form. Read full book review >
NIGHTMARE FLOWER by Elizabeth Engstrom
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 18, 1992

"Often inventive and fanciful, pat and pulpy, goose-bump yarns, many of which have appeared in horror, fantasy, and sf mags."
Engstrom, author of the interesting Lizzie Borden (1991), has labored in the horror genre before (When Darkness Loves Us, 1985) with uncertain results. Read full book review >
BEST NEW HORROR 3 by Stephen Jones
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

"Not to be missed by any serious fan."
Through intelligent selection and commentary, Jones (ed. Read full book review >
I, TITUBA, BLACK WITCH OF SALEM by Maryse Conde
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Tituba deserves better."
Caribbean-born CondÇ (Segu, 1987; The Children of Segu, 1989; and see below) gives questionable life to Tituba, one of the accused and subsequently released witches of Salem, in a novel of some conflicting purpose. Read full book review >
THE YEAR'S BEST FANTASY AND HORROR by Ellen Datlow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 18, 1992

"Pity the price tag has left orbit and was last seen heading for Mars."
Another mammoth and eclectic collection of 44 tales and six poems drawn from 1991's short-format output. Read full book review >
GHOSTWRIGHT by Michael Cadnum
THRILLERS
Released: July 15, 1992

"Cadnum's hyperbolic horror tale, always gripping and smartly paced but usually shaded just this side of ludicrous—and sometimes not even."
A celebrated playwright is stalked by his muse in Cadnum's first non-occult novel, an overwrought thriller that's nonetheless as effectively macabre as his supernatural yarns (St. Read full book review >
GERALD'S GAME by Stephen King
THRILLERS
Released: July 13, 1992

"This one is really scary."
King takes it over the top, way over the top, in an exquisitely horrifying frightfest about a woman forced to face her deepest fears—and then some. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >