Horror Book Reviews (page 61)

THE MAN UPSTAIRS by T.L. Parkinson
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 19, 1991

"This would make a truly scary movie: Are you listening, Polanski?"
An unusually disturbing first novel about newly divorced San Francisco hospital paper-pusher Michael West's psychosexual adventures among the tenants of his new building. Read full book review >
REPRISAL by
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 15, 1991

"Wilson's most gripping yet, with his strongest characterizations."
First-class horror novel and third volume in a malignant- entity series begun with The Keep (1981) and Reborn (1990). Read full book review >

IMAJICA by Clive Barker
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 11, 1991

Dazzling metaphysical epic-adventure as Barker surpasses his previous ground-breaking work (The Great and Secret Show, 1989, etc.) to reconfigure the Fall and to imagine a modern-day attempt to reverse it. Read full book review >
NIGHT OF THE SEVENTH DARKNESS by Daniel Easterman
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 11, 1991

"More horror novel than thriller, grim and unforgiving, and resonant with menace, decay, and the stuff nightmares are made of."
A dark and disturbing foray into voodoo-terror by a master of the religious-conspiracy thriller (The Brotherhood of the Tomb, 1990; The Ninth Buddha, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >
FOUR PAST MIDNIGHT by Stephen King
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 3, 1991

"5 million."
A double-double Whopper hot from the grill of "America's literary boogeyman," as he puts it in his introduction: four sizzling horror novellas sandwiched within the theme of "Time. . .and the corrosive effects it can have on the human heart." Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

"Eclectic, well crafted, with authentic thrills and chills: a solid addition to the series."
Another huge, 51-piece compilation of 44 stories, an essay, and six poems, ranging in tone from light humor through splatterpunk to dark horror. Read full book review >
CAFE PURGATORIUM by Dana M. Anderson
THRILLERS
Released: July 22, 1991

``Three original novels of horror and the fantastic'' claims the publisher in its catalogue and galley copy. Read full book review >
THE HEADSMAN by James Neal Harvey
THRILLERS
Released: July 18, 1991

"See if you can find him before Harvey (By Reason of Insanity, etc.) kills again."
A suburban Friday the 13th for adults: the latest incarnation of an 18th-century executioner is stalking the bedrooms of Braddock, N.Y., beheading lubricious teens. Read full book review >
THE SOUL OF BETTY FAIRCHILD by Robert Specht
THRILLERS
Released: June 25, 1991

"Satisfyingly tense and twisty—it's only the anticlimactic last 20 pages that give you a chance to reflect how unlikely it all is."
Twenty-four years after a South Carolina girl was savagely killed and her presumed black assailant shot down, a young woman in New York is possessed by her vengeful spirit. Read full book review >
THE WAY THE ANGEL SPREADS HER WINGS by Barry Callaghan
THRILLERS
Released: May 15, 1991

"Still, despite an unnecessarily overextended double plot, the core coming-of-age tale and deft prose make this one worthwhile."
A promising though uneven first novel from Canadian journalist, poet, and story-writer Callaghan. Read full book review >
HANGMAN by Christopher A. Bohjalian
THRILLERS
Released: May 1, 1991

Second-rate second novel for Bohjalian (A Killing in the Real World, 1988), who moves through the gloom of an oncoming Vermont winter in this distressingly familiar tale about an old house full of malice, and a yuppie couple from New York who move into it with the hope of making a fresh start. Read full book review >
WILDERNESS by Dennis Danvers
THRILLERS
Released: May 1, 1991

"Still, the novel is just bold and piquant enough to give it a shot at the best-seller lists."
A man and a woman fall for each other, but this is a love story with a difference: the woman happens to be a werewolf. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Luis Alberto Urrea
April 21, 2015

Examining the borders between one nation and another, between one person and another, Luis Alberto Urrea’s latest story collection, The Water Museum, reveals his mastery of the short form. This collection includes the Edgar-award winning "Amapola" and his now-classic "Bid Farewell to Her Many Horses," which had the honor of being chosen for NPR's "Selected Shorts" not once but twice. Urrea has also recently published a poetry collection, Tijuana Book of the Dead, mixing lyricism and colloquial voices, mysticism and the daily grind. We talk to Urrea about both of his new books this week on Kirkus TV. View video >