Horror Book Reviews

SUICIDE FOREST by Jeremy Bates
Released: Dec. 16, 2014

"Bates' choice to avoid brazen scares makes for an understated horror story that will remind readers what chattering teeth sound like."
In Bates' (The Taste of Fear, 2012, etc.) horror novel, a simple excursion into a reputedly haunted forest turns into a nightmare when people start dying in conspicuously unnatural ways.Read full book review >
REVIVAL by Stephen King
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"No one does psychological terror better than King. Another spine-tingling pleasure for his fans."
In his second novel of 2014 (the other being Mr. Mercedes), veteran yarn spinner King continues to point out the unspeakably spooky weirdness that lies on the fringes of ordinary life. Read full book review >

Released: Nov. 3, 2014

"An alternative, humanistic view of ancient Europe that's worthy of readers' consideration.
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In her debut anthropological treatise, Änggård describes a more peaceful, egalitarian past for Europe. Read full book review >
WITHERED HOSTS by Scott Bisig
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"This intelligent, psychologically acute and truly spooky ghost story is an entertaining, impressive debut."
After tragedy strikes a young family, the survivors move to a new, creepy apartment, and they're haunted by more than just their grief. Read full book review >
HELL'S GATES by Mary Masters
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 9, 2014

"Alive with a devilish plot, the book takes a satisfying, twisted journey into evil."
From debut author Masters comes a novel about the sinister side of a small town and the local sheriff's attempts to uncover the truth. Read full book review >

THE BOY WHO DREW MONSTERS by Keith Donohue
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"A sterling example of the new breed of horror: unnerving and internal with just the right number of bumps in the night."
What happens when the monsters under the bed come from the boy sleeping on top of it? Read full book review >
The Holy Innocents and Other Stories by Joan Carol Bird
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 5, 2014

"An offbeat set of horror stories that impart subtle, rather than raw, shocks."
Short story writer Bird (Nightmare and Nostalgia,2013) offers five tales of the fantastic, most involving haunted (or haunting) females. Read full book review >
ASBURY DARK by Lori Bonfitto
Released: Oct. 1, 2014

"Short stories for readers who like their horror tales diverting and diverse."
In Bonfitto's (The Lineman, 2013, etc.) horror collection, Asbury Park, New Jersey, provides the setting for seven strange, spooky stories.Read full book review >
THE HOUSE OF SMALL SHADOWS by Adam Nevill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 2014

"Nevill's talent for horror resonates ominously in every scene, almost as if the theme from Jaws echoes when a page is turned."
British horror author Nevill (Last Days, 2013, etc.) goes hard-core modern gothic when he sends a fragile woman to a derelict estate filled with bizarre treasures. Read full book review >
The Stowaway by Clyde Edwards
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 13, 2014

"A debut horror novel about demonic possession that breathes new life into an old theme."
In Edwards' debut horror novel, a ship's captain discovers a mysterious orb that gradually infuses him with a malevolent personality.In Boston of 1808, young Kit Cabot toils away as a clerk for his family's shipping company while dreaming of adventure on the high seas. Read full book review >
MR. MERCEDES by Stephen King
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 3, 2014

"The scariest thing of all is to imagine King writing a happy children's book. This isn't it: It's nicely dark, never predictable and altogether entertaining."
In his latest suspenser, the prolific King (Joyland, 2013, etc.) returns to the theme of the scary car—except this one has a scary driver who's as loony but logical unto himself as old Jack Torrance from The Shining. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 28, 2014

"An inventive, delectable take on Stoker's classic."
In Wagar's (An American in Vienna, 2011) historical horror novel, detectives in 1896 Transylvania suspect that the enigmatic Count Dracula is responsible for numerous disappearances in the area. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >