Horror Book Reviews

Developing Minds by Jonathan LaPoma
Released: Sept. 14, 2015

"Entertaining and authentic look at the troubled American educational system, courtesy of two men propelled by perseverance and adventuresome spirits."
Two unlikely friends learn about life and hard work through the students they teach. Read full book review >
Daughters of Frankenstein by Steve Berman
Released: Aug. 5, 2015

"A lively and engrossing collection of female-driven fiction."
Berman (Red Caps: New Fairy Tales for Out of the Ordinary Readers, 2014, etc.) edits an anthology of sci-fi and horror from queer perspectives. Read full book review >

Tooth & Talon by James Lee
Released: July 20, 2015

"Eerie, entertaining tales whose recurring themes and characters make them stronger."
Vampires, otherworldly creatures, and human killers populate Lee's debut collection of horror and suspense stories. Read full book review >
THE UNNOTICEABLES by Robert Brockway
Released: July 7, 2015

"A nasty, freaky, and haphazardly funny horror story."
A punk-rock vagabond circa 1977 and a struggling Hollywood stuntwoman circa 2013 find themselves connected through a grotesque paranormal underground society. Read full book review >
Knack by Tom Twitchel
Released: July 7, 2015

"A darkly polished superteen adventure."
This YA novel stars a handicapped teen with special powers striving to make the most of his traumatic past. Read full book review >

BE NOT AFRAID by Cecilia Galante
Released: April 28, 2015

"A quick, freaky read. (Horror. 13 & up)"
A girl finds herself unwillingly connected to her classmate's spiritual possession. Read full book review >
Released: April 28, 2015

"A macabre, otherworldly tale of a young woman 'swallowed whole and alive by the horror that refused to be sated.'"
British author Nevill (House of Small Shadows, 2014, etc.) out-Kings Stephen in this intense tale of séances, houses of ill repute and pervert convicts captured by The Other.Read full book review >
QUEENSBORO by Thomas Drago
Released: April 24, 2015

"A thoroughly effective horror page-turner from an author who's mastered the genre."
Drago follows up his debut novel (Crow Creek, 2014) with another tale of small-town horror in the tradition of Stephen King. Read full book review >
THE EVIL OF OZ by Ryan Fuller
Released: April 7, 2015

"An assertive, endearingly deranged take on the well-known tale from a writer-artist duo readers will want to keep their eyes on."
In Fuller and Baijnath's debut graphic-novel reimagining of L. Frank Baum's classic, Dorothy returns to an Oz corrupted by evil in a tale of bloody retribution. Read full book review >
SUICIDE FOREST by Jeremy Bates
Released: Dec. 16, 2014

"Bates' choice to avoid brazen scares makes for an understated horror story that will remind readers what chattering teeth sound like."
In Bates' (The Taste of Fear, 2012, etc.) horror novel, a simple excursion into a reputedly haunted forest turns into a nightmare when people start dying in conspicuously unnatural ways.Read full book review >
REVIVAL by Stephen King
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"No one does psychological terror better than King. Another spine-tingling pleasure for his fans."
In his second novel of 2014 (the other being Mr. Mercedes), veteran yarn spinner King continues to point out the unspeakably spooky weirdness that lies on the fringes of ordinary life. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 3, 2014

"An alternative, humanistic view of ancient Europe that's worthy of readers' consideration.
In her debut anthropological treatise, Änggård describes a more peaceful, egalitarian past for Europe. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >