MEMOIRS AND CORRESPONDENCE OF FRIEDA LAWRENCE by

MEMOIRS AND CORRESPONDENCE OF FRIEDA LAWRENCE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In 1935, following the 1934 publication of Not I But the Wind, Frieda Lawrence egan in earnest to write ""what may be called her final testament to the value of life and the fullness of her own destiny."" Thus editor Tedlock of the present volume introduces the memoirs, which are followed here more fully, and more revealingly, by a seleced correspondence that ranges from family interchange in 1890 to dealings with publihers and other artists and friends until her death in 1956. The memoirs, couched as hey are in a semi-fictional style, are more annoying than enlightening they recollect n the main childhood, adolescence, early loves, marriage, a love previous to Lawrence f some intensity, Lawrence and after him, Ravagli. The correspondence is more indiative of the independent person Frieda Lawrence was in her own right, is living history f her break with Ernest Weekley to go with Lawrence, her life with him from 1912 to 1930, the mourning period after, the turning to Ravagli and transporting him to New Mexico, the gradual increase of Lawrence's stature and her part in his reputation: Lawrence has grown for me,"" she said. In the late years, she corresponded, with the men who were studying him and making him an institution--Gilbert, Moore, Tindall, eavis; she entered into a lengthy correspondence with John Middleton Murry, eager to ranslate his relationship with them both (perhaps, one suspects, to capitalize upon it). final clutch of essays includes a recipe from Katherine Mansfield, more assessments of Lawrence, the foreward to The First Lady Chatterley. The editing is curiously disappointing in its failure fully to interpret, but the Lawrence devotee will be grateful for the material.

Publisher: Knopf